29 November 2023

Learning Passport Jamaica

Learning Passport Jamaica is a digital and mobile educational platform that effectively operates in both online and offline formats, enabling/facilitating accessible learning for all.  This innovative platform provides a gateway to high-quality school content in alignment with the national curriculum, fostering flexible learning and helping…, Advantages of using the Learning Passport in Jamaica   , Supports learning recovery, especially in the aftermath of the COVID-19 emergency and potential future school closures.  Enhances teachers 'daily pedagogical practices and students' educational experiences.   Builds within teachers the necessary skills to effectively incorporate digital content into their educational practice.  niña está mirando…, Who is the intended audience for Learning Passport in Jamaica?, Students in Grades 1-3 of Primary School, Learning Passport Jamaica provides students with digital content and resources that have been tailored to accomodate a diverse range of learning styles and individual needs.   These materials facilitate the acquisition and refinement of crucial skills through engaging, interactive, and motivating methods.   The platform boasts a diverse range of…, Parents and Caregivers, The platform will also include content dedicated to helping parents and caregivers effectively engage and support their children while using the platform; offering valuable guidance to enhance/maximize/optimize the learner's educational experience., Teachers, Learning Passport Jamaica will provide educators with a range of tools and strategies to support both teaching and students’ learning and assessment.   Teachers will have access to lesson plans, interactive worksheets, activities, video lessons, story reading, videos, games, songs, quizzes, homework assignments, and assessment activities, as well…
19 October 2023

How to talk to your children about conflict and war

Home Parenting  |  Food and nutrition Food and nutrition  |  Early learning Early learning  |  Nurturing care Nurturing care  |  Health Health  |  Security and protection Security and protection  |  Short masterclasses for parents and caregivers Short masterclasses for parents and caregivers When conflict or war makes the headlines, it can cause…, 1. Find out what they know and how they feel, Choose a time and place when you can bring it up naturally and your child is more likely to feel comfortable talking freely, such as during a family meal. Try to avoid talking about the topic just before bedtime. A good starting point is to ask your child what they know and how they are feeling. Some children might know little about what is…, 2. Keep it calm and age-appropriate, Children have a right to know what’s going on in the world, but adults also have a responsibility to keep them safe from distress. You know your child best. Use age-appropriate language, watch their reactions, and be sensitive to their level of anxiety. It is normal if you feel sad or worried about what is happening as well. But keep in mind that…, 3. Spread compassion, not stigma, Conflict can often bring with it prejudice and discrimination, whether against a people or country. When talking to your children, avoid labels like “bad people” or “evil” and instead use it as an opportunity to encourage compassion, such as for the families forced to flee their homes. Even if a conflict is happening in a distant country, it can…, 4. Focus on the helpers, It’s important for children to know that people are helping each other with acts of courage and kindness. Find positive stories, such as the first responders assisting people, or young people calling for peace. The sense of doing something, no matter how small, can often bring great comfort. See if your child would like to participate in taking…, 5. Close conversations with care, As you end your conversation, it’s important to make sure that you are not leaving your child in a state of distress. Try to assess their level of anxiety by watching their body language, considering whether they’re using their usual tone of voice and watching their breathing. Remind them that you care and that you’re there to listen and support…, 6. Continue to check in, As news of the conflict continues, you should continue to check in with your child to see how they’re doing. How are they feeling? Do they have any new questions or things they would like to talk about with you? If your child seems worried or anxious about what’s happening, keep an eye out for any changes in how they behave or feel, such as…, 7. Limit the flood of news, Be mindful of how exposed your children are to the news while it's full of alarming headlines and upsetting images. Consider switching off the news around younger children. With older children, you could use it as an opportunity to discuss how much time they spend consuming news and what news sources they trust. Also consider how you talk about…, 8. Take care of yourself, You’ll be able to help your kids better if you’re coping, too. Children will pick up on your own response to the news, so it helps them to know that you are calm and in control. If you’re feeling anxious or upset, take time for yourself and reach out to other family, friends and trusted people. Be mindful of how you’re consuming news: Try…