It takes a village…

Photo Story

Fre Yilma
UNICEF
UNICEF Myanmar/2018/Nyan Zay Htet

28 November 2018

When children live in conflict affected areas or in camps for the Internally Displaced Persons (IDP), their education will be one of the first things to be compromised. But when communities and local officials realize the future of those vulnerable children can be brighter through education, then it will be possible to keep children learning even in difficult circumstances.  

In Kachin State, following the conflict in April 2018, children from villages in Njang Yang Township, including students and teachers from Zup Mai Yang village, took shelter in Tang Hpre IDP camp. Initially, the children were not able to start the 2018-2019 academic year. However, with the collaboration of the local community, State Parliamentarians and district education authorities children like Hkun Mai are now able to learn within the camp.

UNICEF
UNICEF Myanmar/2018/Nyan Zay Htet

“My name is Hkun Mai (12), a Grade 5 student from Tang Hpre IDP camp. I have five siblings and I am the eldest in my family.”

UNICEF
UNICEF Myanmar/2018/Nyan Zay Htet

“My favorite subject is Myanmar. I am happy to study here, inside the camp. I have also made some new friends in my new class.”

UNICEF
UNICEF Myanmar/2018/Nyan Zay Htet

“My younger brother, Naw Naw San and I play together when we finish our classes for the day.”

UNICEF
UNICEF Myanmar/2018/Nyan Zay Htet

“My dream is to be a football player when I grow up.”

UNICEF supported Early Learning Package (ELP) kits through the State Education Department soon after the children arrived at the Tang Hpre IDP camp but more students have since come to the camp while some transferred to Government schools in the State and beyond. 

UNICEF
UNICEF Myanmar/2018/Nyan Zay Htet

“My name is Kai Nuu (12) Grade-4 student from Tang Hpre IDP camp.”

UNICEF
UNICEF Myanmar/2018/Nyan Zay Htet

“I have four best friends Ywal San, Htoi Si, Bauk Nu and Khun Nan.”

UNICEF
UNICEF Myanmar/2018/Nyan Zay Htet

“My favorite subject is Myanmar and I want to be a Teacher when I grow up.”

Currently, there are seven teachers (one headmistress, four primary teachers and two post primary teachers) and 225 IDP children from KG to Grade 6 in this camp. Recently, UNICEF has provided three school tents for the new IDP students to ease the congestion and students like Hkun Mai, Kai Nu and their siblings and friends can keep learning and fulfill their dreams.