Joint Monitoring Programme Lebanon Water Quality Survey

UNICEF, with the support of Lebanon’s government and World Health Organization, implement the first-ever nationwide household water quality survey in Lebanon.

Young Syrian girl drinks water
UNICEF/2013/Karin Schermbrucker

Highlights

To support the implementation of legislative reform since the year 2000, the Ministries responsible for water (and wastewater), regional authorities and municipalities targeted capital investment and capacity building aimed to improve integrated water resource management and effect sustainable service provision. The Government of Lebanon had initiated national strategies and master plans to support the new legislation based on predicted population demands. Although the drivers/ policy levers for integrated natural resource management did not change, the demand scenarios were superseded in 2012 with a rapid population increase due to the Syrian crisis, together with an associated rise in demand for services including water and wastewater.

Throughout Lebanon’s history, the issue of water quality and its impact on drinking water supply has been a constant theme. Lebanese communities have adjusted to recurring water scarcity and water quality issues by adopting coping mechanisms to meet their demand that often mask the extent of the problem.

With the introduction of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) in 2016, allowing countries to establish their own baseline to achieve development targets, UNICEF with the support of Lebanon’s government and World Health Organization (WHO) took the opportunity to implement the first-ever nationwide household water quality survey in Lebanon. This survey is, therefore, able to establish Lebanon's baseline for SDG 6.1 (safely managed drinking water services), and also to inform water resource management decisions, and support advocacy to improve the safety of drinking water supply in Lebanon.

Lebanon Water Quality Survey report
Author
UNICEF, World Health Organization
Publication date
Languages
English

Download the report

A pdf reader is required to view this report.
(PDF, 2,97 MB)