Child Protection

UNICEF’s Child Protection program aims to ensure that all children and women at risk and survivors of violence, exploitation, and abuse have access to an equitable prevention and response system.

Children playing around in a refugee camp.
UNICEFLebanon2015/teemusilvan

Challenge

Lebanon's social and economic situation, along with the conflict in Syria, are placing increased pressure on already drained resources, with many national and municipal services such as education, health, water and protection being under severe strain, impacting children and adults alike. This has a great physical and psychological impact on disadvantaged children, regardless of nationality but living in Lebanon, including children with disabilities.

Girls and boys are affected by multiple increasing vulnerabilities, due to limited access to education, social protection, health, adolescent activities, and other vital services while exposing them to various child protection and gender-based violence concerns. Children in Lebanon are exposed to child labour (6 percent of Lebanese children aged 5-17, 6.7 percent of Syrian children, and 5 percent of Palestinian children are reported to be in work), and child marriage (4 percent of Lebanese girls aged 15-19, 27 percent of Syrian girls and 4 percent Palestinian girls are reported to be married or in union). Furthermore, more than 56 percent of Lebanese children aged 1-14 years, 65 percent of Syrian children and 81 per cent of Palestinian children in the same age-group report having been subjected to one form of violent discipline, including psychological aggression and any or severe physical punishment.

Solution

Through our Child Protection Programme, we have committed that by 2020, boys, girls, and women at risk and survivors of violence, exploitation, and abuse have access to an improved and equitable prevention and response system. This will primarily be achieved by focusing on four main outputs:

  • Strengthened political commitment, accountability and national capacity of social, justice, education and health sectors in Lebanon to legislate, plan, and budget to prevent and respond at scale to violence, abuse, exploitation, and neglect.
  • Boys, girls, and women at risk or survivors of violence have increased access to an integrated package of quality prevention and response services in most disadvantaged localities.
  • Children, families, and communities in most disadvantaged localities have increased capacities to promote practices that protect them.
  • Reaching children in the most vulnerable communities: UNICEF Lebanon ensures that child protection services reach the most vulnerable disadvantaged children, in particular, children who are working, children with disability, stateless children and children who are at risk of or already married.
Ali, 11, Lebanese.  Construction worker/plumber since the age of 9.
UNICEF/Lebanon 2016/Hedinn Halldorsson

Around 1,000,000 boys and girls and more than 600,000 caregivers received psychosocial support and sensitization on child protection and gender-based violence services, since 2014, including on issues of child labour, child marriage and where to find services.

Our Key Achievements

  • Around 1,000,000 boys and girls and more than 600,000 caregivers received psychosocial support and sensitization on child protection and gender-based violence services, since 2014, including on issues of child labour, child marriage and where to find services.
  • More than 220,000 boys, girls and women accessed safe space activities, since 2014, receiving a package of activities that includes skill-building (incl. life skills), psychosocial support, information sessions on reproductive health, gender equality, child marriage, in addition to recreational activities, case management, and referral to specialized services (legal, medical, safety, MHPSS).