Prevention of violation and sexual abuse of children

A guide for parents/child caregivers on keeping children safe during COVID-19 quarantine at home

UNICEF Viet Nam
Prevention of violation and sexual abuse of children
UNICEF Viet Nam\Vu Le Hoang
09 July 2021

Like many countries in the world, Viet Nam is fighting against the COVID-19 pandemic. The Government of Viet Nam and its frontline Ministries such as the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of National Defence, the Ministry of Public Security and other ministries, sectors and localities are joining efforts to prevent and slow down the spread of this disease.

With the epidemic is still spreading drastically recently, in addition to bringing people who are suspected of being infected or having been in contact with COVID-19 infected people (called F1) into quarantine centres, the Ministry of Health has instructed Ho Chi Minh City to pilot allowing quarantining F1 at home and will re-evaluate the feasibility of this measure in order to decide on the next policy.

To ensure safety, prevention of abuse and violence, and improvement of the mental and psychosocial wellbeing of children during home quarantine, here are some tips for parents and caregivers:

    Violence can happen in the sweet home of the child
    UNICEF Viet Nam\Vu Le Hoang
    Violence can happen in the sweet home of the child
    UNICEF Viet Nam\Vu Le Hoang

    WHAT PARENTS/CHILD CAREGIVERS NEED TO KNOW:

    Violence can happen in the sweet home of the child:

    • Worldwide, nearly 300 million (i.e. 3 out of 4) children aged 2 to 4 are subjected to violent discipline by their caregivers (physical or mental) in their everyday lives.
    • 250 million (about 6 in 10) children are subjected to corporal punishment.
    • 1 in 4 (176 million) children under the age of 5 live with their mother, who has been a victim of domestic violence

    Types of violence against children:

    • Emotional violence: stigmatization, humiliation, scolding/slamming, insulting, threatening, or stressful pressures (from studying or witnessing domestic violence).
    • Physical violence, abuse: beating, tormenting, kneeling, throwing objects at children or other intentional acts that harm the health and life of children
    • Negligence: Neglect, abandon, failure to take care of children's basic needs, and failure to supervise and protect children resulting in putting them at risk of harm.
    • Sexual abuse: Includes acts such as touching a child's private areas of his/her body; entice to engage in sexual acts; rape; forced viewing of genitals or sexually explicit materials; use profanity with sexual contents.
    What should parents do to prevent violence against children?
    UNICEF Viet Nam\Vu Le Hoang

    WHAT SHOULD PARENTS DO TO PREVENT VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN?

    • Be aware of forms of abuse, violence and signs of child abuse and violence in order to timely intervene to avoid further violence and abuse by a family member
    • Manage your own emotions well to prevent yourself from causing emotional and physical violence to your child:
      1. Stay calm in all situations, even if your child behaves negatively or inappropriately
      2. Avoid punishing, hitting or using insulting words.
      3. Be patient, take the time to talk with your child to find out the reasons of his/her behaviours and help him/her adjust.
      4. Set clear rules so your child knows what is expected
    • Manage children's online activities actively to avoid online risks for children

    CALL FOR SUPPORT SERVICES AFTER WITNESSING CHILD ABUSE THAT YOU CANNOT HANDLE BY YOURSELF:

    • National Hotline for Child Protection – 111
    • Local police departments near your area
    • Department of Labour - Invalids and Social Affairs at all levels and the Local People Committee
    • The Peace Shelter of the Vietnam Women's Union – 1900.969.680;