An estimated 1 million children across Idlib are at risk

Idlib has one of the highest number of internally displaced children in the country - any potential escalation of violence in the area will pose an even greater risk for these vulnerable children and their families.

UNICEF Syria
A child outside his tent
UNICEF/ Syria 2018/ Amer Al- Shami

09 September 2018

Across Idlib in northwestern Syria, UNICEF estimates that one million children are at risk. Idlib has one of the highest numbers of internally displaced children in the country - any potential escalation of violence in the area will pose an even greater risk for these vulnerable children and their families.

While only limited humanitarian access is possible through aid convoys and a few partners on the ground, UNICEF is delivering lifesaving assistance to children and families in the area, and preparing for expected displacement of civilians by pre-positioning supplies for 400,000 people.

Since the beginning of May 2018 and as of end of July, UNICEF supported 141,484 people in Idlib city and its suburbs with access to safe water through water treatment and the repair of water systems and pumping stations, the provision of hygiene supplies, summer clothes and school bags for children, health services including vaccinations and screening and treatment of malnutrition in children and mothers, teacher training on the new national curriculum and support to children through the Curriculum b programme to help them catch up on missed learning.

 

UNICEF stands ready to support affected children, but we urge those fighting and those who have influence over them, to prioritise children over any other consideration.  

Child playing outside his tent
UNICEF/ Syria 2018/ Amer Al- Shami
A child playing outside his tent in a collective shelter for families fleeing violence, in northern rural Idlib.
Child playing outside his tent
UNICEF/ Syria 2018/ Amer Al- Shami
Since the beginning of May 2018 and as of end of July, UNICEF supported 141,484 people in Idlib city and its suburbs with access to safe water through water treatment and the repair of water systems and pumping stations, the provision of hygiene supplies, summer clothes and school bags for children, health services including vaccinations and screening and treatment of malnutrition in children and mothers, teachers training on the new national curriculum and support to children through the Curriculum b programme to help them catch up on missed learning.
A child outside his tent
UNICEF/ Syria 2018/ Amer Al- Shami
Ahmad, 7, was displaced with his family from southern rural Aleppo to a tented camp in northern rural Idlib. Ahmad has never seen the inside of a classroom. “The closest school in the area is over an hour walking from here,” says Ahmad.
A girl in her tent
UNICEF/ Syria 2018/ Amer Al- Shami
7-year-old Zainab was displaced with her family form northern rural Homs to a tented camp in northern rural Idlib. Zainab has never seen the inside of a classroom in her life.
Child playing outside his tent
UNICEF/ Syria 2018/ Amer Al- Shami
Ali, 3, was displaced with his family from northern rural Hama to Atma collective shelter near the Syrian-Turkish boarders. With Idlib having one of the highest number of internally displaced children in the country, any potential escalation of violence in the area will pose an even greater risk for these vulnerable children and their families.
A father carrying his child
UNICEF/ Syria 2018/ Amer Al- Shami
Yamen, 11, was displaced with his family from Al-Houla in northern rural Homs, and now lives in a tented camp in northern rural Idlib. Yamen has been living with development delays and requires specialized medical care that has been impossible due to multiple displacements.