Publications

UNICEF Zambia Publications

 

Social policy

The Child Grant Programme – A Comprehensive Summary of Impacts (2010-2014) [PDF]

Summary: This policy brief provides a summary of the main impacts generated by Zambia’s Child Grant Programme during the first four years of implementation (2010-2014). The brief provides information about the programme, study design, areas of effects, and areas where there is no evidence of effects

Date of publication: May 2016

 
The Multiple Categorical Targeting Grant – A Comprehensive Summary of Impacts (2011-2014) [PDF]

Summary: This policy brief provides a summary of the main impacts generated by Zambia’s Multiple Categorical Targeting Grant during the first three years of implementation (2011-2014). The brief provides information about the programme, study design, areas of effects, and areas where there is no evidence of effects.

Date of publication: May 2016

 
Social Cash Transfer Programme Impact Evaluation in Zambia: 30-Month Report for the Child Grant [PDF]

Summary: This report is part of a longitudinal randomized controlled trial that analyses the impact of Zambia’s Social Cash Transfer programme. It presents the findings from a Child Grant Programme follow-up survey 30 months after a baseline was conducted. The evaluation found that cash transfers: (i) reduce the poverty gap among beneficiary households; (ii) help protect consumption during the lean season; (iii) enhance food security and; and (iv) generate productive and economic impacts for families and communities.

Date of publication: December 2014

 
Social Cash Transfer Programme Impact Evaluation in Zambia: 36-Month Report for the Child Grant [PDF]

Summary: This report is part of a longitudinal randomized controlled trial that analyses the impact of Zambia’s Social Cash Transfer programme. It presents the findings from a Child Grant Programme follow-up survey 36 months after a baseline was conducted. The evaluation found that cash transfers (i) reduce the poverty gap among beneficiary households; (ii) help protect consumption during the lean season; (iii) enhance food security and; and (iv) generate productive and economic impacts for families and communities.

Date of publication: December 2014

 
Social Cash Transfer Programme Impact Evaluation report for the Multiple Category Targeting Grant in Zambia: 24 Month Report [PDF]

Summary: This report is part of a longitudinal randomized controlled trial that analyses the impact of Zambia’s Social Cash Transfer programme. It presents the findings from a Multiple Categorical Grant Programme follow-up survey 24 months after a baseline was conducted. The evaluation found that cash transfers reduce the poverty gap among beneficiary households, help protect consumption during the lean season, enhance food security, and generate productive and economic impacts for families and communities.

Date of publication: December 2014

 
Research on the Views, Experiences and Perceptions of Social Cash Transfer Programme Recipients and their Communities in Zambia: Report on the 10 per cent inclusive Social Cash Transfer Scheme [PDF]

Summary: This report is part of a research project that explores the wider impacts of social cash transfers in Zambia, with a focus on perceptions, experiences, and opinions of recipients. Report provides an analysis of findings from a single round of field-study visits to communities in Southern Province in Zambia, in which the “10% Inclusive” social cash transfer scheme has been operating. The study found that the 10% inclusive social cash transfer program is perceived as an important and regular source of income to meet basic needs, invest in children’s education and purchase assets. It is also perceived as affecting social dynamics (relationships between households, social inclusion, and broader community relations). The study found that the program improves the subjective wellbeing of recipients (at both household and community level). Almost all sampled recipients perceived an improvement in their achievement of goals in respect of food and health since receiving the cash transfer, with an overall perception of an improved quality of life. The findings indicate the need for complementary interventions for recipients to make lasting changes to their poverty or vulnerability status.

Date of publication: June 2014

 
Research on the Views, Experiences and Perceptions of Social Cash Transfer Programme Recipients and their Communities in Zambia: Report on the Child Grant [PDF]

Summary: This report is part of a research project that explores the wider impacts of social cash transfers in Zambia, with a focus on perceptions, experiences, and opinions of recipients. It presents findings from fieldwork conducted in Child Grant Program districts. The study found that the Child Grant Program is perceived as an important and regular source of income to meet basic needs, invest in children’s education and purchase assets. It is also perceived as affecting social dynamics (relationships between households, social inclusion, no gender effects detected).

Date of publication: March 2014

 
Social Cash Transfer Programme Impact Evaluation in Zambia: 24-Month Report of the Child Grant [PDF]

Summary: This report is part of a longitudinal randomized controlled trial that analyses the impact of Zambia’s Social Cash Transfer programme. It presents the findings from a Child Grant Programme follow-up survey 24 months after a baseline was conducted.

Date of publication: September 2013

 
Social Cash Transfer Programme Impact Evaluation report for the Multiple Category Targeting Grant in Zambia – Baseline Report [PDF]

Summary: This report is part of a longitudinal randomized controlled trial that analyses the impact of Zambia’s Social Cash Transfer programme. It presents baseline findings of the Multiple Categorical Grant Programme.

Date of publication: December 2012

 

Social Cash Transfer Programme in Zambia: Basline Report [PDF]

Summary: This report is part of a longitudinal randomized controlled trial that analyses the impact of Zambia’s Social Cash Transfer programme. It presents baseline findings for the Child Grant Programme.

Date of publication: November 2011

 

 
Search:

 Email this article

unite for children