Real lives: Sabola Bashir

Yemen Emergency Cash Transfer Project

UNICEF Yemen
UNICEF/Yemen/PMU/2019

21 February 2020

Sabola is an elderly woman originally from Al-Salafia village in Raymah governorate. For many years she has lived in Hizyaz, a suburb of Sana’a, and now lives in a small house with nine family members, including her son, daughter-in-law and their six children.

Sabola’s 22-year-old grandson, Mabrouk, is devoted to her and is her faithful caretaker. Like many vulnerable families in Yemen, Sabola’s family has suffered greatly due to the ongoing conflict and the scarce job opportunities. They rely on the cash benefit of the Emergency Cash Transfer (ECT) Project to survive. “One doesn't know how and where to find a source of income” says Mabrouk. “I feel helplessly overwhelmed by my inability to help my grandmother and family or provide for their needs, as if I am incapacitated.”

UNICEF/Yemen/PMU/2019
Sabola receiving her cash benefit at home.

Given her old age, Sabola requested to be served at home by the outreach teams of the ECT Project. “Now, they, the outreach team, come to my place to hand me my SWF cash benefit making that so much easier for me and Mabrouk. I can feel God's eyes looking down on me with pity." 

Home outreach services are provided free of cost to elderly, sick, differently abled and pregnant beneficiaries. To request such services, beneficiaries are only required to file a complaint by calling the toll-free UNICEF Call Centre.   

In his own words, Mabrouk expresses his gratitude for the ECT project and its impact: "My grandmother can hardly move due to old age. It's nice that the team comes to our home, and in doing so, they save us a lot of troubles.

Thank God, the money we receive helps us cover her needs. I can purchase some of my grandmother's needs especially medicines.”

UNICEF/Yemen/PMU/2019
Mabrouk buys medicines for his grandmother with the ECT cash benefit.