02 January 2024

Feeding your baby: 1–2 years

At 1 year old, your child is learning to eat on their own. They can chew food as well as you can, so they can eat the same foods as the rest of the family., In brief: Feeding your child at 1–2 years, At 1 year, solid foods – including healthy snacks – are now your child’s main source of energy and nutrition. Jar icon Your child can take between three quarters to one cup of food three to four times a day, plus one to two snacks between meals. Breastfeeding icon Continue breastfeeding as much as your child wants, until at least 2 years old. no…, What to feed your child, Your child can eat anything, so you can give them some of all the food your family eats and make every bite count. Each meal needs to be packed with nutritious food. Be sure your child has a portion of animal foods (milk, dairy, eggs, meat, fish and poultry) each day, plus legumes (like chickpeas, lentils or peas) – or nuts, and orange or green…, How much food and how often, Your child can take between three quarters to one cup of food three to four times a day, plus one to two snacks between meals. If you’re not breastfeeding, then your child will need to eat more often. At 1 year, about the time children start to walk, your child's feeding schedule should include four to five meals a day, plus two healthy snacks.…, Foods to avoid, Avoid junk food and soft drinks. Factory-made snacks like crisps, cookies, cakes, soda and candy are unhealthy. They have high amounts of sugar, salt, fat and chemicals, and take up space in your child’s stomach that should be filled with nutritious foods., Mealtime tips, Having their own bowl of food will help your child learn to feed themselves. Start as soon as your child wants. Give them all the food they need and plenty of time to eat.  At first, your child will be slow and messy. Help them to get most of the food in their mouth (instead of on themself or the floor!). Encourage your child to finish it and make…, What to do when your child refuses to eat solid foods, Make sure your child is hungry at mealtimes and has not just had a snack. Although breastfeeding continues to be healthy for your child, breastfeed them only after their meal. At this age, they should eat solid food first.  Give your child healthy food that they like or mix the food they like with food they don't like as much. Try different food…
02 January 2024

Feeding your baby: 6–12 months

Young children need enough nutritious food every day to grow healthy, strong and smart. At around 6 months old, your baby is growing quickly and needs more energy and nutrients than at any other time in their life., In brief: Feeding your baby at 6–12 months, After 6 months, breastmilk is still your baby’s main source of energy and nutrients, but solid foods should now be added. Jar icon Your baby has a small stomach and needs to be eating small amounts of soft nutritious food frequently throughout the day.  fruits icon In addition to grains and tubers, feed your baby a variety of foods – especially…, Your baby's first foods, When your baby is 6 months old, they are just learning to chew. The first foods need to be soft so they’re very easy to swallow, such as porridge or well mashed fruits and vegetables. Did you know that when porridge is too watery, it doesn't have as many nutrients? To make it more nutritious, cook it until it’s thick enough not to run off the…, Feeding your baby: 6–8 months old, From 6–8 months old, feed your baby half a cup of soft food two to three times a day. Your baby can eat anything except honey, which they shouldn't eat until they reach 12 months old. You can start to add a healthy snack, like mashed fruit, between meals. As your baby gets increasing amounts of solid foods, they should continue to get the same…, Feeding your baby: 9–11 months old, From 9–11 months old, your baby can take half a cup of food three to four times a day, plus a healthy snack. Now you can start to chop up soft food into small pieces instead of mashing it. Your baby may even start to eat food with their fingers. Continue to breastfeed whenever your baby is hungry. Each meal needs to be both easy for your baby to…, Feeding non-breastfed babies, If you're not breastfeeding, your baby will need to eat more often. They'll also need to rely on other foods, including milk products, to get all the nutrition their body needs. Start to give your baby solid foods at 6 months of age, just as a breastfed baby would need. Begin with two to three spoonfuls of soft and mashed food four times a day,…
04 May 2023

A tale of two children’s journeys to recovery from malnutrition

Máy and Yêu are among over 200,000 children in Viet Nam who suffer every year from severe wasting. UNICEF works tirelessly to ensure that no child’s life is threatened by this disease.  The child would not stop crying in the hospital ward. One hand fumbling with a yellow duck toy, the father pulled her in and quietly stroked her thin hair. At age…, Late detection and treatment, This was not the first time that Máy was brought to Dien Bien Dong District Hospital, Dien Bien, where UNICEF supports the strengthening of the nutrition programme at the commune level. Her life is again in critical condition because of severe wasting 1 .  “Her parents brought her when the case is already too severe. She no longer has an appetite…, Severe wasting, a silent emergency, Despite progress, Máy is one of over 200,000 children in Viet Nam who still suffer annually from severe wasting. The disease is life-threatening and detrimental to children’s healthy development, yet access to its treatment remains low. For marginalized households that often suffer from multidimensional poverty like Máy’s family, the silent…, A wonder that saves lives, In another village in Dien Bien province, Yêu, who just turned 1, was regularly sick.  “She coughed a lot, was feverish and I had to skip our farming work to stay home with her,”  said her mother Dúa.  When contacted by the UNICEF-supported Pu Nhi Health centre, she and her husband drove through 11 kilometres of rutted mountain roads to bring Yêu…, UNICEF in action, After a few weeks, Yêu started eating better and gained weight. Her smiles were bracketed by soft rosy cheeks, while her eyes sparkled. She crawled quickly, chewed fingers, and pointed at her surroundings with curiosity and enthusiasm.   “She has not been sick and could eat well! She doesn’t cry as much as before. Now I feel better going to work…, An unrelenting mission to end malnutrition, With both local and global expertise, UNICEF’s interventions for nutrition are evidence-based, cross-sectoral, and innovative. The goal is unchanged: to end all forms of malnutrition.  “UNICEF supports the national health system to scale up the most practical solutions and focus on increased levels of local ownership,”  said Quang. In Dien Bien…