20 April 2022

Navigating pregnancy during the COVID-19 pandemic

Pregnancy is a special time full of excitement and anticipation. But for many people, the COVID-19 pandemic has clouded this time with fear, anxiety and uncertainty. Here is the latest information on pregnancy, COVID-19 and vaccines, as well as expert tips on how to have a safe pregnancy during the pandemic. We will update this article as new…, Jump to:, Understanding my risk How to protect myself Getting the COVID-19 vaccine while pregnant Getting the COVID-19 vaccine while breastfeeding COVID-19 vaccines and fertility If I have COVID-19 will I pass it to my baby? Is it safe to continue prenatal check-ups? Giving birth in hospital Can my partner or family member be nearby when I give birth?…, I'm pregnant. Am I at higher risk from COVID-19?, Pregnant women do not seem to be at higher risk of contracting COVID-19. However, you are at higher risk of serious illness if you get COVID-19 while pregnant. You are also at higher risk of delivering your baby prematurely if you get COVID-19. That’s why it’s important you – and people around you – take precautions to protect against COVID-19.…, What should I do to protect myself from COVID-19 while pregnant?, Pregnant women should take the same precautions to avoid COVID-19 infection as other people. To help protect yourself and people around you: Consider vaccination in consultation with your healthcare provider. Wear a mask where physical distancing from others is not possible. Keep a physical distance from others and avoid poorly ventilated or…, Can I get the COVID-19 vaccine if I’m pregnant?, Yes, you can get vaccinated if you are pregnant. Although the overall risk of severe illness from COVID-19 remains low, pregnancy puts you at higher risk of severe illness compared to people who are not pregnant. While there is less data available on vaccination of pregnant people, evidence on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines during pregnancy has…, Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine if I’m breastfeeding?, Yes, if you are breastfeeding you should take the vaccine as soon as it is available to you. It is very safe and there is no risk to the mother or baby. None of the current COVID-19 vaccines have live virus in them, so there is no risk of you transmitting COVID-19 to your baby through your breastmilk from the vaccine. In fact, the antibodies that…, I plan to have a child. Can COVID-19 vaccines affect fertility?, No, you may have seen false claims on social media, but there is no evidence that any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines, can affect fertility in women or men. You should get vaccinated if you are currently trying to become pregnant., If I have COVID-19 will I pass it to my baby?, We still do not know if the virus can be transmitted from a mother to her unborn or newborn baby. To date, active COVID-19 (virus that causes infection) has not been found in fluid in the womb or breastmilk. The best thing you can do is to take all necessary precautions to prevent yourself from contracting COVID-19. If you’re pregnant or have just…, Is it safe to continue prenatal check-ups?, Many expectant mothers are fearful of going to appointments while they are taking precautions, such as staying home and practicing physical distancing when outside. Find out what options are available to you from your healthcare provider. After your child is born, it is also important to continue receiving professional support and guidance,…, I was planning on giving birth in a hospital or healthcare clinic. Is this still a good option?, The risk involved depends on where you live. For the safest option for you, it is important to speak to the healthcare professional who is supporting you through your pregnancy and birth. They will be able to advise you on the risks and the safest option depending on your personal situation and local health care system., Can my partner or family member be nearby when I give birth?, While policies vary by country, you should have someone nearby to support you, as long as the proper precautions are taken, such as wearing a mask while in the delivery room and washing hands. As Franka Cadée, President of the International Confederation of Midwives, told us: “I can understand that you want to reduce the number of people with a…, I’m feeling incredibly anxious about giving birth. What should I do to cope?, The COVID-19 pandemic has been a stressful and uncertain time for everyone, and especially for those about to give birth. Having a plan in place for your birth can help ease feelings of anxiety by giving you more of a sense of control, but also recognize that some aspects may need to change depending on the situation where you live. Your plan…, What questions should I be asking my healthcare provider?, It is important to establish a trusting relationship with your healthcare provider. “All of those questions that have to do with you and your health, I would ask them freely,” says Franka Cadée, President of the International Confederation of Midwives. “If you have an open relationship with your healthcare provider – with your midwife, with your…, I have COVID-19. What should I expect during pregnancy or childbirth?, If you have or suspect you may have COVID-19, it is important to seek medical care early and follow instructions from your health care provider. Remember that you and your child have the right to high quality care throughout your pregnancy and after childbirth. You should be supported to: Breastfeed safely (see breastfeeding tips during COVID-19)…, I have COVID-19. Can I safely breastfeed my baby?, Yes. Transmission of active COVID-19 (virus that can cause infection) through breast milk and breastfeeding has not been detected to date, so there is no reason to stop or avoid breastfeeding. If you have or suspect you may have the COVID-19 virus, it is important to seek medical care early and follow instructions from your health care provider.…, Once I have given birth, what can I do to protect my newborn from the COVID-19 virus?, The level of risk involved depends on where you live. As a starting point, check for any relevance guidance from your local authorities. You should take more precautions in areas with higher rates of COVID-19 transmission and lower levels of vaccinations. If the risk is higher where you live, then consider sticking to just your family and not…
11 March 2021

Routine vaccinations during COVID-19: What parents need to know

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has brought with it fear and uncertainty. Many parents are asking about when there will be a COVID-19 vaccine and what to do about routine childhood vaccinations during the pandemic. We're here to provide answers to your most common questions.  , When will the vaccine for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) be available?, Developing a safe and effective vaccine takes time, but thanks to the unprecedented investment in research and development and global cooperation, scientists have been able to develop a vaccine against COVID-19 in record time, while still maintaining robust, evidence-based and rigorous regulatory standards. On 31 December 2020, WHO listed the…, Should my child still get routine vaccines during the COVID-19 pandemic?, While COVID-19 is disrupting our daily lives, the short answer is yes, do try to get your child vaccinated where services are available. It is important that children and babies keep their vaccinations up to date because they protect them from serious diseases. It means that when your children can return to interacting with other children, they’ll…, What do you think we can learn from this outbreak? What can it teach us about other diseases and the decision to vaccinate?, This outbreak reminds us of how valuable vaccines are. It shows us that when there is a vaccine available for a disease, we should keep our children and ourselves up to date with that vaccination.  Without the protection of vaccines, diseases can spread quickly and with terrible consequences. For example, measles and other diseases remain a…, How do vaccines work?, Vaccines help train our immune system to fight infections by introducing an inactivated form of a germ (bacteria or virus) into the body. Since it is inactivated, it cannot make us sick. However, it triggers our body’s immune system to produce defences called antibodies. Then, if you ever catch the germ, your body’s immune system will already know…, Where can I find the latest guidance on vaccinations?, Contact your health care provider, consult your local and national health authority websites and follow guidance provided by  WHO  and  UNICEF .  , How can I protect myself and others from COVID-19?, Some of the precautions you and your family can take to help avoid infection include: Washing your hands frequently using soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub. Avoid touching your face, especially your eyes, nose and mouth. If you sneeze or cough, cover mouth and nose with flexed elbow or a tissue. Dispose of used tissue immediately. Avoid…, I have a newborn to 1-year-old. How can I protect my baby from COVID-19?, In addition to all of the advice already given to parents about hand washing, physical distancing and maintaining hygiene practices, they should take extra care to protect infants from infection. Breastfeed your baby if possible. There is currently no proven research that breastmilk can transmit the virus, but you should take the usual hygiene and…, What should I do if my child is showing symptoms of COVID-19? Is it safe to take her to the doctor?, If your child has a sore throat, a cough or a fever, call your doctor or health service for advice before bringing them in. They may have a special arrangement at the clinic to minimise spread of infection to others. If your child has more serious symptoms, like shortness of breath or seems unusually sick, call the emergency number or take them to…, Should I get my child tested for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)?, You don’t need to have your child tested if he or she is healthy and not showing any symptoms (such as fever, cough or difficulty breathing). Do also make sure to take all key steps to protect your family against COVID-19., Coronavirus Q&A, A conversation with Professor Julie Leask, Public Health expert at the University of Sydney.     >>  Immunization Learn more about immunization >>  World Immunization Week 2020 World Immunization Week This article was originally published on 23 April 2020. It was last updated on 14 January 2021.    
23 January 2020

New Babies Usher in a Decade of Hope

In Viet Nam, significant progress has been made over the past 25 years in improving survival rates for children under five years of age. Between 1990 and 2018, deaths per 1,000 live births reduced from 52 to 21.  It is estimated that 47 newborns die every day in Viet Nam. Most are from preventable causes. Infant mortality rates in the North and…, Meet Hao, the first baby boy born in 2020 from Kon Tum, Viet Nam,   Firs Baby Boy of 2020 of father A Ho and mother YO from Liem Rang, Kon Rieng, Dak Choong, Đak Glei, Kon Tum. UNICEF Viet Nam\Truong Viet Hung Firs Baby Boy of 2020 of father A Ho and mother YO from Liem Rang, Kon Rieng, Dak Choong, Đak Glei, Kon Tum. UNICEF Viet Nam\Truong Viet Hung Display caption Show Original Caption Display caption Show…, Meet Dang Thi Bao Tran, the first baby girl born in 2020 from Kon Tum, Viet Nam,   Baby Girl from Village 1, Tan Lap commune, Kon-Rãy District, Kon Tum UNICEF Viet Nam\Truong Viet Hung Baby Girl from Village 1, Tan Lap commune, Kon-Rãy District, Kon Tum UNICEF Viet Nam\Truong Viet Hung Display caption Show Original Caption Display caption Show Original Caption “Our baby girl is a gift from God to my family,” beamed Sang,…, Meet Nguyễn Hoàng Sunny, the first baby girl born in 2020 from Kon Tum, Viet Nam ,   Firs Baby Boy of 2020 of father A Ho and mother YO from Liem Rang, Kon Rieng, Dak Choong, Đak Glei, Kon Tum. UNICEF Viet Nam\Truong Viet Hung Firs Baby Boy of 2020 of father A Ho and mother YO from Liem Rang, Kon Rieng, Dak Choong, Đak Glei, Kon Tum. UNICEF Viet Nam\Truong Viet Hung Display caption Show Original Caption Display caption Show…, Meet A Ka Thanh, the first baby boy born in 2020 from Kon Tum, Viet Nam,   Firs Baby Boy of 2020 of father A Ho and mother YO from Liem Rang, Kon Rieng, Dak Choong, Đak Glei, Kon Tum. UNICEF Viet Nam\Truong Viet Hung Firs Baby Boy of 2020 of father A Ho and mother YO from Liem Rang, Kon Rieng, Dak Choong, Đak Glei, Kon Tum. UNICEF Viet Nam\Truong Viet Hung Display caption Show Original Caption Display caption Show…, Meet Trinh Le Mai Anh, the first baby girl born in 2020 from Gia Lai, Viet Nam, Baby Girl from Hbang Village, Kon Long Khong, K-Bang, Gia Lai UNICEF Viet Nam\Truong Viet Hung Baby Girl from Hbang Village, Kon Long Khong, K-Bang, Gia Lai UNICEF Viet Nam\Truong Viet Hung Display caption Show Original Caption Display caption Show Original Caption Trinh Le Mai Anh is the second child in the family but her mother tells us, “The…