02 January 2024

Feeding your baby: 1–2 years

At 1 year old, your child is learning to eat on their own. They can chew food as well as you can, so they can eat the same foods as the rest of the family., In brief: Feeding your child at 1–2 years, At 1 year, solid foods – including healthy snacks – are now your child’s main source of energy and nutrition. Jar icon Your child can take between three quarters to one cup of food three to four times a day, plus one to two snacks between meals. Breastfeeding icon Continue breastfeeding as much as your child wants, until at least 2 years old. no…, What to feed your child, Your child can eat anything, so you can give them some of all the food your family eats and make every bite count. Each meal needs to be packed with nutritious food. Be sure your child has a portion of animal foods (milk, dairy, eggs, meat, fish and poultry) each day, plus legumes (like chickpeas, lentils or peas) – or nuts, and orange or green…, How much food and how often, Your child can take between three quarters to one cup of food three to four times a day, plus one to two snacks between meals. If you’re not breastfeeding, then your child will need to eat more often. At 1 year, about the time children start to walk, your child's feeding schedule should include four to five meals a day, plus two healthy snacks.…, Foods to avoid, Avoid junk food and soft drinks. Factory-made snacks like crisps, cookies, cakes, soda and candy are unhealthy. They have high amounts of sugar, salt, fat and chemicals, and take up space in your child’s stomach that should be filled with nutritious foods., Mealtime tips, Having their own bowl of food will help your child learn to feed themselves. Start as soon as your child wants. Give them all the food they need and plenty of time to eat.  At first, your child will be slow and messy. Help them to get most of the food in their mouth (instead of on themself or the floor!). Encourage your child to finish it and make…, What to do when your child refuses to eat solid foods, Make sure your child is hungry at mealtimes and has not just had a snack. Although breastfeeding continues to be healthy for your child, breastfeed them only after their meal. At this age, they should eat solid food first.  Give your child healthy food that they like or mix the food they like with food they don't like as much. Try different food…
02 January 2024

Feeding your baby: 6–12 months

Young children need enough nutritious food every day to grow healthy, strong and smart. At around 6 months old, your baby is growing quickly and needs more energy and nutrients than at any other time in their life., In brief: Feeding your baby at 6–12 months, After 6 months, breastmilk is still your baby’s main source of energy and nutrients, but solid foods should now be added. Jar icon Your baby has a small stomach and needs to be eating small amounts of soft nutritious food frequently throughout the day.  fruits icon In addition to grains and tubers, feed your baby a variety of foods – especially…, Your baby's first foods, When your baby is 6 months old, they are just learning to chew. The first foods need to be soft so they’re very easy to swallow, such as porridge or well mashed fruits and vegetables. Did you know that when porridge is too watery, it doesn't have as many nutrients? To make it more nutritious, cook it until it’s thick enough not to run off the…, Feeding your baby: 6–8 months old, From 6–8 months old, feed your baby half a cup of soft food two to three times a day. Your baby can eat anything except honey, which they shouldn't eat until they reach 12 months old. You can start to add a healthy snack, like mashed fruit, between meals. As your baby gets increasing amounts of solid foods, they should continue to get the same…, Feeding your baby: 9–11 months old, From 9–11 months old, your baby can take half a cup of food three to four times a day, plus a healthy snack. Now you can start to chop up soft food into small pieces instead of mashing it. Your baby may even start to eat food with their fingers. Continue to breastfeed whenever your baby is hungry. Each meal needs to be both easy for your baby to…, Feeding non-breastfed babies, If you're not breastfeeding, your baby will need to eat more often. They'll also need to rely on other foods, including milk products, to get all the nutrition their body needs. Start to give your baby solid foods at 6 months of age, just as a breastfed baby would need. Begin with two to three spoonfuls of soft and mashed food four times a day,…
04 January 2023

Self-care for parents

Parenting is hard. It’s a full-time job and many parents find themselves prioritizing their family’s well-being before their own. When we are able to meet our own mental and physical needs, it not only benefits our well-being, but our children’s as well. But how do you make it happen? We asked three mental health experts, who are also parents, how…, What have you learned about self-care as a parent?, Lisa: Very often, I think parents assume that taking time for themselves means that they are taking time away from their children. But this isn't true. When we care for ourselves, we are better able to care for our children. And caring for ourselves underscores for our children the importance of self-care while also showing them how it's done.…, How do you personally practice self-care?, Sonali: The time I take out for myself is what I call my 'Pause Rituals' – a conscious pause in the day followed by rituals that are self-soothing at a physical, mental and social level. I came up with this term after I struggled with burnout about 10 years ago. The key is to focus on just one thing when engaging in these self-soothing practices…, How do you find time for self-care?, Hina: Time for self-care feels out of reach for me – it literally slips through my fingers as I run around parenting my two young children and completing the tasks of my day job. I always feel on duty. I prioritize self-care by baking it into my routines with my children and at work. When I brush my teeth, I practice mindfulness, while I cook, I…, How has your family benefitted from your self-care?, Lisa: When I'm well-rested and my mind is clear, I am much more patient with my children and a lot more fun to be around. After a good night's sleep, I have energy to play, host a "kitchen dance party," or come up with other ways to enjoy my daughters' company. And when I'm not distracted by my own concerns, I am much better able to focus on my…