UNICEF supports rehabilitating water infrastructure in Deir Ezzor

“Now, I can shower every day, and have water left over for our trees and animals, just like the old days!” says Musaab with a broad smile.

UNICEF
child drinking glass of water
UNICEF/Syria2019/Bashar Kheder

02 October 2019

For many people around the world, using water at home is a matter of turning on a water tap, but for 13-year-old Musaab it’s a three-kilometer ride on a donkey to the Euphrates river. He had to make this trip three times every day to get the water his family needs. The back and forth rides between his village and the river took him up to three hours a day.

“Every morning, we would check the news; when the route to the river was safe, I would go there with several neighbors to fetch water,” recalls Musaab, “but when there was an upsurge in violence, we would go without water for days.” Desperate for water, the family of ten either had to buy it from private contractors at 3,000 SYP (about 6 USD) per 200 litre jerry can. “It meant we had to ration our bathing and laundry to once every other week.”

For three years, Musab’s village in western rural Deir-ez-Zor had no access to safe drinking water after conflict caused severe damage to the water infrastructure.


"Now, I can shower every day, and have water left over for our trees and animals, just like the old days!"

Musaab
children drinking from a water hose
UNICEF/Syria2019/Bashar Kheder

 

Thanks to a generous contribution from the Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations department (ECHO), UNICEF supported the rehabilitation of five water pumping stations in western rural Deir-ez-Zor bringing back safe drinking water to nearly 200,000 people in five villages.