UNICEF supports children go back to learning

More than 600 children resumed their education through the rehabilitation of three conflict-damaged schools, including 29 classrooms.

UNICEF
student girl showing a drawing notebook in a classroom
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen

07 November 2019

UNICEF supports children in rural Qamishli and Al-Hasakeh to go back to learning More than eight years of fighting have impacted the education infrastructure across Syria, threatening children’s prospects of a better future. With more than one in three schools damaged or destroyed and 2.1 million children estimated to be out school in Syria, every child’s right to education should be protected. Following a respite in violence and to support children in rural Qamishli and Tal Hamees, northeast rural Al-Hasakeh, resume their learning with the beginning of the school year, UNICEF has helped children access a safe learning environment through school rehabilitation.

students in a classroom
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“My favourite part about the rehabilitation is the new restrooms. They look nice, and are convenient to use,” says Hasan, 10 years old, who attends grade 4 in Abu Zweil town, south rural Qamishli, Syria. Hasan, has a medical condition called ‘strabismus’ -also called ‘lazy eye’- which causes the two eyes not to be properly aligned, creating some difficulties when reading and writing. Nonetheless, Hasan is determined to continue his education. He wants to become an ophthalmologist in the future to help people with sight issues. Hasan’s elder brother, who is in grade 5, helps him study whenever he faces difficulties.
students ins a classroom
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“I wake up to school every day dreaming of becoming an engineer,” says Salah Al-Din, 9, who attends grade 3 in Abu Zweil town, south rural Qamishli, Syria. This school year Salah Al-Din resumed his learning after having missed out on three years of education due to the conflict.

“I wake up to school every day dreaming of becoming an engineer,”

Salah Al-Din, 9
student girl in a clasroom
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“I love my new classroom especially the brightly-painted walls! The school yard is also very clean,” says Nisreen, 10 years old, from Kawa village, rural Qamishli. Nisreen makes a daily one-hour journey to get to school in Abu Zweil town, south rural Qamishli to benefit from formal schooling. In her home village, Kawa, the only available school, does not offer the formal curriculum. “I’ve made new friends at school, and I learned how to read and write,” says Nisreen who dreams of becoming a teacher in the future.

The rehabilitation works included the installation of doors, windows and boards as well as painting walls and ceilings of classrooms. Water and sanitation facilities in the schools have been maintained and new latrine units were provided. “Coming to school is more exciting now after the rehabilitation! And I get to learn interesting things every day while I enjoy my new classroom,” says, Moafak, 10 years old, who attends grade 4 at in a school at Abu Zweil town, south rural Qamishli, Syria. “The best thing that I’ve learned in school was to respect people older than me and to be patient with those younger than I am,” adds Moafak, who dreams of becoming physician in the future.

students in a classroom
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“Coming to school is more exciting now after the rehabilitation! And I get to learn interesting things every day while I enjoy my new classroom,” says, Moafak, 10 years old, who attends grade 4 in a school at Abu Zweil town, south rural Qamishli, Syria. “The best thing that I’ve learned in school was to respect people older than me and to be patient with those younger than I am,” adds Moafak, who dreams of becoming a physician in the future.

“Coming to school is more exciting now after the rehabilitation! And I get to learn interesting things every day while I enjoy my new classroom,”

Moafak, 10
student girl in a classroom
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“Last year the school doors and windows were broken, the paint was falling off the walls, and we didn’t have water in the lavatories,” says Aryam, 10 years old, who studies grade 4 in Abu Zweil town, south rural Qamishli, Syria. “Now the school looks great! The teacher encouraged us to take care of the school and keep it clean,” adds Aryam, who wants to become a math teacher when she grows up because math is her favourite subject.
student boy in a classroom
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“The school looks so much nicer this year than it did last year. I’m excited about coming here every day,” says Motasim, 10 years old, who attends grade 4 at a school in Abu Zweil town, south rural Qamishli, Syria. “I learned a lot about the organs of the human body, multiplication and the months of the year both in Arabic and English,” he adds.
students in a classroom
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“I wrote an answer on the blackboard this morning, and it was very smooth. My handwriting looked good,” says Noor, 9 years old, who attends grade 3 in a school at Abu Zweil town, south rural Qamishli, Syria. “the teacher taught us how to keep our school, home and the environment clean by not throwing rubbish on the ground. I found that useful,” she says.
student girl drawing on whiteboard
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
Aisha, 7, attends grade 2 at a school in Abu Zweil town, south rural Qamishli. “I love the new classrooms! They’re very clean, comfortable and the boards are easy to write on,” she says. “This year, I’m more excited about being in school with my friends and learning new things than I was last year,” adds Aisha.

“I love the new classrooms! They’re very clean, comfortable and the boards are easy to write on,”

Aisha, 7
girl washing hands in a school
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“I love learning and spending time with my friends at school,” says Manar, 7, who attends grade 3 in a school at Abu Zweil town, south rural Qamishli, Syria.

With thanks to a generous contribution from Norway, UNICEF has supported more than 600 children, from grades 1 to 9 in rural Qamishli and northeast rural Al-Hasakeh, to safely resume their education with the beginning of this school year, through the rehabilitation of three conflict-damaged schools, including 29 classrooms.