UNICEF supports children displaced by violence in northeast Syria

Around 74,400 people continue to be displaced in collective shelters, such as schools, and in host communities in Al-Hasakeh and Ar-Raqqa governorates.

UNICEF
group of children playing on ground
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
21 November 2019

UNICEF supports children displaced by violence in northeast Syria with psychosocial support and mine-risk education in Al-Hasakeh city Six weeks into the escalation of violence in northeast Syria, thousands of families have been forced to flee their homes with nothing more than bare essentials. Around 74,400 people continue to be displaced in collective shelters, such as schools, and in host communities in Al-Hasakeh and Ar-Raqqa governorates.

children drawing
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
Children taking part in UNICEF-supported psychosocial support activities provided by volunteers at schools-turned-shelters in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria, as part of UNICEF’s support for families displaced by the recent escalation of violence in northeast Syria.
child looking at a poster
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“We escaped Ras al-Ain in two groups because there were not enough places for all of us on my father’s motorcycle,” says Mahmoud, 11, who participated in a UNICEF-supported mine-risk education session at a school shelter in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria, where his family sought safety. “My father took my siblings out of the city first, while my mother and I packed some of our clothes. Then he came back for us, and we were all together again,” he adds.

“We escaped Ras al-Ain in two groups because there were not enough places for all of us on my father’s motorcycle,”

Mahmoud, 11
girl showing her drawings
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“I had to leave behind my books, my school bag and dolls,” says Rojin, 10, who dropped out of grade 4 in school due her family’s displacement by the recent escalation of violence in northeast Syria. The family fled escalating violence in Ras al-Ain, northeast Syria, seeking safety at a school shelter in Al-Hasakeh city. “We got in my father’s car. He drove us from Ras al-Ain to Dasbasiyah (east of Ras al-Ain), but the town was also under attack, so we ended up in Al-Hasakeh city,” she added.
a child showing a drawing
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“We had to leave our home after a shell fell nearby damaging our neighbour’s house,” says Muhammad, 10, who fled with his family their hometown of Ras al-Ain, north Syria, seeking safety at a school shelter in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria.
a child showing a drawing
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“I dream of peace in Syria. I wish for families to go back to their homes and for children to go back to school,” says Rim, 10, who fled with her family escalating violence in their hometown of Ras al-Ain, northeast Syria, seeking safety at a school shelter in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria. Rim dreams of becoming a humanitarian worker when she grows up to help displaced families and people in need.
a child showing a drawing
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“If I had the power, I would end this conflict right now, so that people can go back to their homes and children to their schools,” says Nour, 10, who with her family of ten fled escalating violence in Ras al-Ain, northeast Syria, seeking safety at a school shelter in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria. Now displaced twice, Nour, who dreams of becoming a journalist in the future, had come to Ras al-Ain with her family five years ago after having escaped violence in Al-Safira, southeast rural Aleppo.

“If I had the power, I would end this conflict right now, so that people can go back to their homes and children to their schools,”

Nour, 10
children reviewing books
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“It’s our last chance to survive! Said my father during the attacks,” says Isa, 10, who fled with his family their hometown of Ras al-Ain, northeast Syria, seeking safety at a school shelter in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria. “My mother and sisters were crying the whole way here. They were very scared. But I tried not to,” adds Isa, who participated in a UNICEF-supported mine-risk education session. He wishes to go back home and to school. Issa dreams of becoming a teacher in the future to help children build a better future.
children playing
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasen
“The sounds of attacks were frightening. My younger siblings cried because they were afraid, and so we decided to leave,” says Amani, 12, who took part in a game organised at a school shelter in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria, as part of psychosocial support provided by UNICEF to displaced children. Amani’s family fled escalating violence in their hometown of Ras al-Ain, northeast Syria, seeking safety at with relatives in Tal Tamr, northwest Al-Hasakeh, before arriving in a school shelter in Al-Hasakeh city

Over 31,000 of them are children. UNICEF and partners are reaching children in collective shelters in Al-Hasakeh city with psychosocial support including entraining activities and sports games to alleviate some of their distress and help them cope with the situation. To raise their awareness about explosive hazards, UNICEF-supported volunteers are also providing the children with mine-risk education.