UNICEF supports children and families in Al-Hasakeh

Thousands of children screened for malnutrition, received nutritional supplements, curative and preventative health and nutrition services through UNICEF-supported fixed health centres including multiple awareness-raising sessions.

UNICEF
young kid eating
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasan

27 October 2019

UNICEF supports children and families in Al-Hasakeh, displaced by recent hostilities in northeast Syria, with lifesaving health and nutrition More than two weeks into the escalation of hostilities in northeast Syria have forced close to 180,000 people -nearly 80,000 of them children- to flee for safety toward Al-Hasakeh and Ar-Raqqa governorates. While many of the displaced families have sought shelter with relatives and in host communities, some are currently staying at collective shelters under very basic conditions, adding to their vulnerability as several of them had been displaced before due to violence.

UNICEF health worker checking a child in a shekter
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasan
To support close to 180,000 people, including nearly 80,000 children, displaced due to recent escalation of violence in northeast Syria, UNICEF and partners are providing lifesaving health and nutrition services in collective shelters and host communities across Al-Hasakeh governorate where most displaced families have sought shelter. More than 5,000 women and children have been reached by UNICEF-supported mobile teams in 30 collective shelters across Al-Hasakeh, through the provision of urgently needed malnutrition screening for children under five years of age and Pregnant and Lactating Women (PLW), high energy biscuits, awareness messages on Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) and primary health care consultations for women and children as well as referrals to fixed health centres as needed. Curative and preventative health and nutrition services are also being provided through UNICEF-supported fixed health centres across Al-Hasakeh including maternal and child health awareness-raising on immunisation, Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) practices and hygiene. But as the movement of children and families continues, their needs continue to grow. More needs to be done ensuring vulnerable children and families remain dignified, healthy and protected.
MUAC test for a baby
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasan
Fahad, 1, being screened for malnutrition using a MUAC (Middle Upper Arm Circumference) tape in a school-turned-shelter in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria. “We slept out in the open for a whole night before arriving here,” says Huda, his mother, who fled with her family nearing violence in Darbasiyah, northern border town, seeking shelter in Al-Hasakeh city.
UNICEF worker test MUAC for a child
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasan
Hozan, 3, receiving a malnutrition screening from a UNICEF-supported health worker in a school-turned-shelter in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria. “As we left town, the shells were falling on both sides of the roads. My children were screaming in fear,” says Amna, Hozan’s mother, who fled the violence in Ras al-Ain, northern border town, Syria, arriving in Al-Hasakeh city a few days ago looking for safety.
MUAC test for a child
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasan
Four-year-old Ahmad, being screened for malnutrition using a MUAC (Middle Upper Arm Circumference) tape in a school-turned-shelter in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria. “This conflict has turned our lives upside down,” says Ebtiasm, Ahmad’s mother, who fled with her family escalating hostilities in Ras al-Ain, northern border town, and sought safety in a school-turned-shelter in Al-Hasakeh city. Following his screening, Ahmad was referred to a UNICEF-supported fixed health centre for a consultation based on the assessed need.
girl in a shelter
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasan
“We had to leave home and everything else behind because of the attacks. I was so scared,” says, Samar, 10, who fled with her family their hometown of Ras al-Ain, northern border town, Syria, due to escalating violence. She has been out of school now for several days due to conflict and displacement but wishes to resume her education soon. Samar’s younger siblings were screened for malnutrition by UNICEF-supported health works in a school-turned-shelter in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria, where the family is currently seeking safety.

“We had to leave home and everything else behind because of the attacks. I was so scared,”

Samar, 10

In the shelters, Hasakeh city, and surrounding rural areas, UNICEF and partners have screened 1,331 children under five years for malnutrition. 1,922 medical consultations were also provided to women and children and an additional 2,341 women and children have received multiple nutritional supplements and supplies in the same locations. Curative and preventative health and nutrition services are also being provided through UNICEF-supported fixed health centres across Al-Hasakeh including maternal and child health awareness-raising on immunisation, Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) practices and hygiene. But as the movement of children and families continues, their needs continue to grow. More needs to be done ensuring vulnerable children and families remain dignified, healthy and protected.

UNICEF health worker feeding a child high energy biscuits
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasan
Three-year-old Ahmad receiving high energy biscuits from a UNICEF-supported health worker in a school-turned-shelter in Al-Hasakeh city, northeast Syria. “We can’t stay here forever. We need to return home,” says Salima, Ahmad’s mother, who fled with her family their hometown of Ras al-Ain, northern border town, Syria, a few days ago due to escalating violence, looking for safety in Al-Hasakeh city.
children sitting in row in shelter
UNICEF/Syria2019/Masoud Hasan
To support close to 180,000 people, including nearly 80,000 children, displaced due to recent escalation of violence in northeast Syria, UNICEF and partners are providing lifesaving health and nutrition services in collective shelters and host communities across Al-Hasakeh governorate where most displaced families have sought shelter. More than 5,000 women and children have been reached by UNICEF-supported mobile teams in 30 collective shelters across Al-Hasakeh, through the provision of urgently needed malnutrition screening for children under five years of age and Pregnant and Lactating Women (PLW), high energy biscuits, awareness messages on Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) and primary health care consultations for women and children as well as referrals to fixed health centres as needed. Curative and preventative health and nutrition services are also being provided through UNICEF-supported fixed health centres across Al-Hasakeh including maternal and child health awareness-raising on immunisation, Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) practices and hygiene. But as the movement of children and families continues, their needs continue to grow. More needs to be done ensuring vulnerable children and families remain dignified, healthy and protected.