UNICEF empowers youth in Hama with diverse skill-building service.

Many thanks to the generous contributions from Norway and Germany.

UNICEF
19 December 2021

More than a decade into the conflict in Syria, young people continue to be among the most impacted ones and their prospects of a better future remain at risk. Many of these young people have been forced to drop out of school due to violence or displacement and some had to work to support their families. UNICEF and partners support the vulnerable adolescents and youth with a diverse range of skill-building services at centres across the country.

Two young females working on laptop
UNICEF/Syria/2021 /Abdulaziz AlDroubi
(left to right) Zakeyeh and Nour, both 22, during a skill-building session for young people at a UNICEF-supported multiservice centre in Qusour neighborhood, Hama city, west-central Syria. “I completed the International Computer Driving License (ICDL) course and I am currently doing a course in accounting,” says Zakeyeh. “Everyone is friendly at the centre and the teacher is super kind,” she adds.
Two youth working on laptop
UNICEF/Syria/2021 /Abdulaziz AlDroubi
Mohammad, 23, and Qamar, 21, during a skill-building session for young people at a UNICEF-supported multiservice centre in Qusour neighbourhood, Hama city, west-central Syria. “I heard about the centre through social media,” says Mohammad, a recent graduate from the Faculty of Economics. “I wanted to improve my computer literacy, through the International Computer Driving License (ICDL), and take some accounting courses,” he adds. He mentions that he has largely benefitted from what he has learned as the courses involved a lot of practical exercises. “I encourage ambitious young people to work on themselves and become more active in their community. These courses are a great way to do so.”
Two young females testing blood pressure monitor
UNICEF/Syria/2021 /Abdulaziz AlDroubi
Rasha, 23, from Hama, measures another participant’s blood pressure during a nursing course at a UNICEF-supported multiservice centre in Qusour neighbourhood, Hama city, west-central Syria. “I have truly benefitted from the course and believe that these types of skills are necessary for everyone,” says Rasha, a graduate from the Faculty of Education.
Two youth traying blood pressure monitor
UNICEF/Syria/2021/ Abdulaziz AlDroubi
(left to right) Omar and Hashem, both 21, from Hama, practice during a UNICEF -supported nursing course in Qusour neighbourhood, Hama city, west-central Syria. “I like to learn new things and I am interested in nursing. These types of skills will help me to help the elderly in my family and community. With simple actions, such as measuring their blood pressure or giving an injection when needed, I can support them,” says Omar. He is a graduate from the Engineering Institute and currently pursuing studies in the Faculty of Economics.

In 2021, UNICEF has provided 4,200 adolescents and youth with Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and nearly 9,000 adolescents and youth have benefitted from skill-building training, including through the Life Skills and Citizenship Education (LSCE). This has been possible thanks to the generous contributions from Norway and Germany.

group of youth sitting in a room
UNICEF/Syria/2021 /Abdulaziz AlDroubi
In 2021, with thanks to the generous contributions from Norway and Germany, UNICEF has provided 4,200 adolescents and youth with Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and nearly 9,000 adolescents and youth with skill-building training, including through Life Skills and Citizenship Education (LSCE), to enhance their employability. The focus of these programmes is to empower young people, especially girls and young women, in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). This will support their transition from ‘learning’ to ‘earning’ and promote technological, digital and civic engagement, helping to address any social norms preventing them from accessing services.
Youth female talking during a session
UNICEF/Syria/2021 /Abdulaziz AlDroubi
(centre) “I come to the centre for the life skill sessions. I’ve learned a lot about solving problems and setting priorities,” says 20-year-old Maha. She is benefitting from the skill-building services at a UNICEF-supported multiservice centre in Qusour neighbourhood, Hama city, west-central Syria.
Girl talking during a session
UNICEF/Syria/2021 /Abdulaziz AlDroubi
“I started coming to the centre a couple of weeks ago and I’ve already made some friends,” says Aya, 12, from Hama, central Syria. She is in Grade 7 and taking part in the Life Skills and Citizenship Education (LSCE) training at a UNICEF-supported centre in Qusour neighbourhood, Hama city, west-central Syria.

“I started coming to the centre a couple of weeks ago and I’ve already made some friends,”

Aya, 12
Female youth talking during a session
UNICEF/Syria/2021 /Abdulaziz AlDroubi
(centre) Hajjah, 18, from Hama, central Syria, attends a Life Skills and Citizenship Education (LSCE) session at a UNICEF-supported centre in Qusour neighbourhood, Hama city, west-central Syria. She dropped out of school in Grade 9 after not passing the national examination but is determined to keep on learning. “I first attended a course in English, then courses in life skills and nursing,” she says. “The information I gain, helps me not only to improve myself but also equips me with skills on how to work with others,” adds Hajjah, who dreams of becoming an interior designer. She plans to retake the national exam next year to continue her education.
Girls with trainer during a session
UNICEF/Syria/2021 /Abdulaziz AlDroubi
In 2021, with thanks to the generous contributions from Norway and Germany, UNICEF has provided 4,200 adolescents and youth with Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and nearly 9,000 adolescents and youth with skill-building training, including through Life Skills and Citizenship Education (LSCE), to enhance their employability. The focus of these programmes is to empower young people, especially girls and young women, in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). This will support their transition from ‘learning’ to ‘earning’ and promote technological, digital and civic engagement, helping to address any social norms preventing them from accessing services.
Female youth with trainer in a session
UNICEF/Syria/2021 /Abdulaziz AlDroubi
“I had to drop out of school in Grade 7. I want to learn an occupation to be able to support myself and my family,” says Samah, 17, from Hama, west-central Syria. She is benefitting from a UNICEF -supported vocational training in Hama city and hopes to be a tailor in the future.

The focus of these skill-building programmes is to empower young people, especially girls and young women, in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). This will support their transition from ‘learning’ to ‘earning’ as well as promote technological, digital and civic engagement to help address any social norms preventing them from accessing services.