29/11/2022

Driving innovation in construction at UNICEF

Innovation is an important part of UNICEF’s mission to realize the rights of every child, especially the most excluded. UNICEF is a powerful force for social transformation and can help address a range of humanitarian challenges, including water and sanitation, health, education and child protection.   Construction at UNICEF UNICEF construction…, Reimagining education systems in Cameroon using digital learning tools, Many construction innovations developed by UNICEF are focused on modernizing or scaling infrastructure for education.   ‘Connect My School’, for example, was launched to provide access to digital learning opportunities and reinforce quality education for children in Cameroon. The initiative supports Cameroon’s national mandate to provide…, Residential solutions to create safe living environments in Mongolia, UNICEF’s construction innovations take many forms and support its programmes for children, including direct support for family housing.   In Mongolia’s extremely harsh winters, coal-fired stoves are used for heating in traditional Mongolian dwellings known locally as gers . Consequently, air pollution in Mongolia is caused mainly by coal burning…, Innovative construction materials address multiple community needs, UNICEF’s innovation initiatives often take system-based approaches to devise solutions to development or humanitarian challenges. For construction, this frequently means the use of innovative materials.   Côte d’Ivoire faces a severe and mounting waste management issue. The province of Abidjan produces 288 tons of plastic waste daily, 90 per cent…, UNICEF construction: essential role in the success of our product innovations, For health systems in many low- and middle-income countries, the COVID-19 pandemic turned an existing oxygen gap into a crisis. The innovative Oxygen Plant-in-a-Box saves the lives of children suffering from pneumonia UNICEF’s Oxygen Plant-in-a-Box is an innovative emergency solution that produces enough medical-grade oxygen to treat up to 50…
15/11/2022

Scaling infrastructure during health emergencies

In many countries, the COVID-19 pandemic quickly overwhelmed healthcare systems and left them unable to cope with the sudden surge of critically ill patients. In response to the pandemic, UNICEF launched the most extensive and complex emergency operations in its history which included support in construction of health facilities to help save lives…, Year-round preparedness in construction , UNICEF provides construction solutions that enable governments and communities to repurpose existing spaces or build new temporary facilities to address a health crisis. In past Ebola disease outbreaks, UNICEF supported the building of isolation centres in West Africa that helped contain disease transmission and supported the health workers in…, Bringing COVID-19 resources to hospitals in Burundi , COVID-19 isolation wards at community hospitals COVID-19 isolation wards at community hospitals. Historically, Burundi’s health system has been very centralized. As a result, populations who live outside major urban centres must travel long distances to access healthcare from district-level hospitals.   As part of the COVID-19 response, UNICEF…, Isolation and treatment centres made from bamboo in Cox’s Bazar Refugee Camp , Located in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, Kutupalong refugee camp is the world’s largest refugee camp, inhabited by Rohingya refugees who brought with them accounts of the unspeakable violence and brutality that had forced them to flee.   Poor sanitation conditions and lack of space for isolation presented a major risk for the Rohingya and host…, Community Care Centres during the Ebola crisis , Two white tents with UNICEF logo on them. Ebola Community Care Centre, Sierra Leone. Between 2014 and 2016, during the unprecedented scale of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the lack of treatment beds for patients required an urgent solution. The construction of Community Care Centres (CCCs) was one of the approaches implemented by UNICEF and…, Construction innovation for future emergencies, A white High Performance Tent with the blue UNICEF logo. Health emergency facilities utilize High Performance Tents, one of UNICEF’s recent construction innovations. Recent infectious disease outbreaks such as Ebola and COVID-19 have highlighted the urgent need for rapidly deployable surge facilities that enable health workers to screen, isolate,…
08/11/2022

Reimagining school construction for scalability and sustainability

Around 75 million children living in crisis-affected countries desperately need education support. In emergencies or other situations when school infrastructure needs to be scaled up quickly, UNICEF provides innovative Construction at UNICEF construction solutions to get children back into safe learning environments.   The construction of hundreds…, Modular school construction in Türkiye , By the end of 2019, there were 3.6 million Syrian refugees in Türkiye, including 1.6 million children. Due to the Syrian crisis, a large influx of refugee children in Türkiye led to overcrowding in local schools. Additional classroom space was urgently needed but building permanent school structures was not an option due to time and financial…, Rapid and sustainable recovery of schools in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), The Kamuina Nsapu insurgency between 2016 and 2019 destroyed many schools in the affected provinces. To get children impacted by this crisis back into school and create a safe learning environment, UNICEF used local labour and materials to implement a transformable model to rebuild schools with 384 classrooms in Kasaï province.   Three stages of…, Sustainable local materials to scale up schools for refugee children in Bangladesh , In Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, Kutupalong is the world’s largest refugee camp – home to Rohingya refugees who brought with them accounts of the unspeakable violence and brutality that had forced them to flee Myanmar.  There are currently 902,947 Rohingya refugees living in 34 Kutupalong and adjacent camps in Cox’s Bazar District. Over half are…
31/10/2022

UNICEF construction brings sustainability commitments to life

In 2021, Supply Annual Report UNICEF procured construction services totalling $257.1 million , including $106.7 million in the Middle East and North Africa Region and $64.1 million in the West and Central Africa Region. Additionally, UNICEF implements millions of dollars in construction works through its partners.    UNICEF construction covers a…, Building schools with local resources, In 2021, UNICEF used local materials and labour to reconstruct 384 classrooms in 64 schools destroyed during the 2016 - 2019 Kamuina Nsapu insurgency in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. UNICEF employed a sustainable, transformable school model to get children back into the classroom as quickly as possible and later transformed the foundation…, Testing green building in remote and challenging environments  , Much of Qinghai province in China is remote, mountainous, arid – and endures very cold winters. Under conditions that challenge standard building approaches used elsewhere in the country, UNICEF piloted the construction of innovative water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities in conjunction with China’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural…, Greening the UNICEF office in Bangladesh, In December 2020, UNICEF opened the doors of its new three-storey office in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The office can host over 200 staff members and its construction deployed several sustainable building strategies. The greening of this office began with its architectural design, developed in consultation with UNICEF’s Greening Team, which works to make…, Sustainable strategies in construction, UNICEF employs key strategies to reduce is environmental footprint and increase the sustainability of the structures it builds, including utilising: Local or regional sourcing of materials to reduce CO2 emissions of transportation. Recycled building materials. Waste disposal channels for toilets and kitchens, which eliminate pollution of…
08/05/2020

One small step in technology, one giant leap for mothers

In May last year, Emma, 34, was giving birth to her fourth child. She was prepared for this special moment, as were the healthcare workers in her village of Kirakira in Papua New Guinea. However, there were complications, and Emma began to lose a significant amount of blood.   “I went off [lost consciousness]. I did not know what was happening.…, Preventable maternal deaths, Post-partum hemorrhage (PPH) - or severe bleeding after childbirth - is the largest direct cause of maternal mortality worldwide, responsible for more than a quarter of the 300,000 estimated deaths each year. These women are dying from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth, with WHO: key facts on maternal mortality 94 per cent of…, A life-saving garment,   A woman demonstrates how the Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment is used at a health clinic in Papua New Guinea. A woman demonstrates how the Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment is used at a health clinic in Papua New Guinea. The Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG) is a low-cost first-aid device that limits persistent PPH. It’s a compression suit…, NASG in Papua New Guinea and Bangladesh, In 2018, UNICEF added NASG to its portfolio of innovation projects to use its capacity in scaling proven technologies to make this life-saving product available in locations where it’s needed most. NASG has been introduced in several countries, including Papua New Guinea and Bangladesh. In Papua New Guinea, since its introduction in March 2019…, Scaling NASG to save the lives of more mothers, Through research and advocacy efforts UNICEF is striving to build a global consensus for NASG. Multiple clinical studies note a significant impact that NASG has on reducing maternal mortality at a low cost for programming (on average, US$3 per use). 1   WHO recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postpartum haemorrhage WHO recommends…