Why Mosquito Nets are Affective

UNICEF is supporting a mass distribution of mosquito nets in Sudan during this high malaria transmission season

UNICEF
A woman put a child to sleep under a mosquito net in their house in Ad-Damazin, the capital of the Blue Nile State in Sudan.
Shehzad Noorani
23 December 2020

UNICEF is supporting the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) and partners in its efforts to fight against Malaria and other vector borne diseases. One of the most effective means of preventing malaria is sleeping under a mosquito net, specifically a long-lasting insecticide treated net (LLIN). UNICEF in collaboration with the FMoH and the Global Fund to fight to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, is conducting LLIN distribution campaign to benefit 9.2 million people across 12 high risk states in Sudan.

As a core prevention tool, LLINs have played an important role in the remarkable success in reducing malaria burden across the globe.

Sudan still has one of the lowest health indicators in the region, and the disparity between urban and rural and between rich and poor is high. Only seventy per cent of the population has access to a health facility within 30 minutes of travel distance. Children still die from preventable or easily treatable diseases such as acute respiratory infections (including pneumonia), diarrheal diseases, malaria and neonatal conditions.

A girl child assist her mother to put up a mosquito net in her house in Ad-Damazin, the capital of the Blue Nile State in Sudan.
Shehzad Noorani
A girl child assist her mother to put up a mosquito net in her house in Ad-Damazin, the capital of the Blue Nile State in Sudan.

UNICEF is supporting the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) and partners in its efforts to fight against Malaria. One of the most effective means of preventing malaria is sleeping under a mosquito net, specifically a long-lasting insecticide treated net (LLIN). UNICEF in collaboration with the FMoH and the Global Fund to fight to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, is conducting LLIN distribution campaign to benefit 9.2 million people across 12 high risk states in Sudan.

As a core prevention tool, LLINs have played an important role in the remarkable success in reducing malaria burden across the globe.

Sudan still has one of the lowest health indicators in the region, and the disparity between urban and rural and between rich and poor is high. Only seventy per cent of the population has access to a health facility within 30 minutes of travel distance. Children still die from preventable or easily treatable diseases such as acute respiratory infections (including pneumonia), diarrheal diseases, malaria and neonatal conditions.