The toxic truth

Children’s exposure to lead pollution undermines a generation of future potential

Ten years old, Al Amin works at a garage where he repairs batteries near the Tangail New Bus Stand on 1 February 2014.
UNICEF/UNI157477/Kiron

Highlights

Around 1 in 3 children – up to 800 million globally – has blood lead levels at or above 5 micrograms per decilitre (µg/dL), a level that the World Health Organization and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have stated it requires global and regional interventions.

This joint report by UNICEF and Pure Earth notes that lead is a potent neurotoxin that causes irreparable harm to children’s brains. It is particularly destructive to babies and children under the age of 5 as it damages their brain before they have had the opportunity to fully develop, causing them lifelong neurological, cognitive and physical impairment. Childhood lead exposure has also been linked to mental health and behavioural problems and an increase in crime and violence. Older children suffer severe consequences, including increased risk of kidney damage and cardiovascular diseases in later life, the report says.

It is clear from evidence compiled that lead poisoning is a much greater threat to the health of children than previously understood. Although much more research needs to be conducted, enough data have recently emerged for decisive action to begin – and it must begin now.

Please contact: pubdoc@unicef.org

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Author
UNICEF and Pure Earth
Publication date
Languages
English

Download the report

(PDF, 14,35 MB)