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Cyclone Pam: New appeal for children amid critical funding shortfall - UNICEF

© UNICEF/21 March 2015/Gaelle Sevenier
Adelaide (11) and Catalia (1) were able to access clean water today, after UNICEF restored their community’s water system – at Teoumaville, Efate, Vanuatu.

NEW YORK/VANUATU, 24 March 2015 – UNICEF has only around fifteen per cent of the money it needs to get life-saving aid to thousands of children and their families, after Cyclone Pam wreaked havoc in Vanuatu and other Pacific islands, the organisation warned today. The children’s organisation revealed the huge funding shortfall as it announced a new US$4.8 million humanitarian appeal, as part of a wider United Nations US$29.9 million ask for Vanuatu launched today. 

Around 82,000 children - about two thirds of the children in Vanuatu - are in need of humanitarian assistance. 

UNICEF is concentrating on making sure that children and their families in Vanuatu – as well as in affected communities in Tuvalu, Solomon Islands and Kiribati - have access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene, health services including immunisation, treatment of diarrhoea, care of new-borns and appropriate safe infant and young child feeding and supplying nutrient supplements. We are also protecting children from violence, exploitation and abuse.

Schools officially re-opened today, however, 80 percent of schools were damaged in Vanuatu and 34 schools were used as evacuation centres. Furthermore, teaching housing was destroyed, thus, UNICEF is also focusing its efforts on ensuring that more than 50,000 school-aged children affected by the cyclone return to school as soon as possible.

“Children – especially those in the hardest-to-reach islands - are in serious danger right now,” says Karen Allen, UNICEF Pacific Representative. “Access to safe water remains absolutely critical – with almost all islands in Vanuatu suffering from acute water shortages – while there is a significant risk of disease because of flooding, poor sanitation and limited medical care.”

“Thankfully emergency preparations - including warning systems and the use of traditional light materials in housing – prevented a higher death toll,” Ms Allen continued. “Relief supplies are beginning to reach people, though logistics remain challenging and expensive”.

As of 23 March, UNICEF had received around US$769,000 towards its emergency response to Cyclone Pam.

“We have committed US$2.7 million in procurement and transport costs, some from loaned funding which has to be repaid. We urgently require more funds to reach more children in desperate need especially on the remote islands”, says Allen

 “Life-saving supplies are getting through, however, we urgently require more funds to reach more children in desperate need especially on remote islands,” says Karen Allen. 

The aid response to Cyclone Pam involves huge logistical challenges. Kiribati, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu and Vanuatu are made up of numerous islands – Vanuatu alone has 83 – with high costs involved in procuring and delivering vital supplies.

Donate now to help us reach children in Vanuatu: 

www.supportunicef.org

www.supportunicef.org/cyclonedonate

Interviews are available with UNICEF staff working on the emergency response to Cyclone Pam.

Photos and video footage

New photos and video can be downloaded here: http://uni.cf/1Eh6Z8J 

Latest stories, including quotes from staff on the ground, here: http://unicefeapro.blogspot.com/ 

About UNICEF

UNICEF promotes the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything we do. Together with our partners, we work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of all children, everywhere. 

UNICEF Pacific works with 14 Pacific island countries and territories, which are home to 2.3 million people, including 1.2 million children and young people. These people are spread out across 660 islands and atolls inside 17.2 million square kilometres of the Pacific Ocean, an area comparable to the combined size of the United States of America and Canada. For more information about UNICEF and its work visit: unicefpacific.org

For further information, please contact:

Alice Clements (Vanuatu), Tel: +678 546 7132, aclements@unicef.org 

Andrew Brown (Bangkok), Tel: + 66 2 356 9407, abrown@unicef.org

Rose Foley (New York), Tel: +1 917 340 2582, rfoley@unicef.org 

 

 
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