Education

Education

 

Peacebuilding, Education and Advocacy Initiative

UNICEF
© UNICEF Myanmar/2009/ Tun Nay Win

For decades Myanmar has been beset by multiple conflicts and communal violence. This has resulted in large-scale internal and cross border displacement, insecurity and the emergence of violently contested spaces along borderlands. Such an environment has had a profoundly negative impact on the state of Myanmar’s education.

 The opening up of Myanmar in 2011 and subsequent removal of sanctions was quickly followed by ceasefire agreements being signed with many armed ethnic minority groups. However, much of the country is still affected by ongoing and recent conflict. Many people are still living in Internally Displaced Person (IDP) camps in border areas, where their access to basic services is extremely limited.

The Peacebuilding, Education and Advocacy (PBEA) initiative is a global partnership between UNICEF, the Government of the Netherlands, the national governments of 14 participating countries and other key supporters. The PBEA team in Myanmar works to engage diverse education stakeholder groups in meaningful and inclusive education reform processes in order to strengthen trust between the government and ethnic groups.

Key activities include:

  • Awareness raising with Ministry of Education on conflict sensitivity in education policy
  • Support to Curriculum Reform through trainings on conflict sensitivity and peacebuilding with curriculum developers
  • Language, Education and Social Cohesion workshops and trainings with key policy planners including Non-State Actors
  • Development of student and teacher materials in local ethnic languages
  • Conflict Sensitivity integrated into training for teachers and head teachers
  • Training provided jointly to Government and Non-State Actor Schools
  • Disaster Risk Reduction at the school level
  • Support to Rakhine State and Kachin State including teacher training and salaries and construction of schools in IDP camps and host communities

 

 
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