Parenting schools expand to include Nikšić

Fifty-nine-year-old Nusret Bešo from Nikšić is a father of seven.

Tina Dimić Raičević
Parenting school in Nikšić
UNICEF Montenegro / Duško Miljanić / 2019
27 January 2020

NIKŠIĆ, 20 December 2019 – Fifty-nine-year-old Nusret Bešo from Nikšić is a father of seven. His oldest child is 19; his youngest, 6 years old. Despite his significant experience in child-rearing, Nusret decided to attend the “Parenting for Lifelong Health” programme, which is being implemented in Montenegro with the support of UNICEF, European Union and the Austrian Development Agency. His goal was to improve his relationship with his children. He now says it is one of the best decisions he has ever made.

Fifty-nine-year-old Nusret Bešo, is a father of seven
UNICEF Montenegro / Duško Miljanić / 2019
Fifty-nine-year-old Nusret Bešo, a father of seven, speaking about the knowledge he gained at the parenting workshops, in Nikšić, in December, 2019.

“I heard about the parenting workshops in the Centre for Roma Initiatives and decided to apply as I wanted to learn how I could become a better parent. And it was not the wrong decision. I look forward to every workshop, as I have learned a lot about myself at them, which then has had an effect on the whole family.

Nusret Bešo, a father of seven

He explains that he has been using the workshop exercises on a daily basis, transferring the knowledge gained at them to his wife, as well as to his neighbours.

“They see that I understand my children better now, as well as that my children understand me better. There are no more quarrels. When I get angry at the children, I explain the situation to them so that they know why I am mad and then we solve the issue by talking about it. Children need our attention and it is our duty to show them the right path,” Nusret clarifies.

In addition to Nusret, the workshops are also being attended by seven mothers, including Miranda Delija, a mother of seven. Her motivation for joining the programme was the need to change certain forms of behaviour in her youngest son.

He used to cause a lot of trouble and was very unruly, getting into problems, beating up his siblings. He did great at school, but always caused problems back home.

Miranda Delija, a mother of seven
Miranda Delija, a mother of seven
UNICEF Montenegro / Duško Miljanić / 2019
Miranda Delija, a mother of seven, sharing her experience form the parenting workshops, in Nikšić, in December, 2019.

The behaviour of Miranda’s son changed as she amended her own conduct and started to apply the exercises she learnt at the workshops.

“I started to listen to him more, to show appreciation for what he was saying, to pay more attention to him. I simply could not believe the extent to which his behaviour started to change. Now he tells me that I am the best mother, he helps me and thanks me,” Miranda explains, indicating that the boy’s relationship to his siblings has also largely improved.

Facilitator Maja Šaćirović is extremely pleased with the results achieved so far in the work with parents from the Roma and Egyptian communities.

Facilitator Maja Šaćirović
UNICEF Montenegro / Duško Miljanić / 2019
Facilitator Maja Šaćirović says that she is extremely pleased with the results achieved so far in the work with parents from the Roma and Egyptian communities, in Nikšić, in December, 2019.

Parents understand the programme – we have seen their commitment to apply everything we do and to absorb every part of the programme we pass on to them. We have also noticed how much they are actually trying and how eager they are to tell us about what they have done, about the challenges they have had and the ways in which they have managed to overcome them.

Maja Šaćirović, a facilitator

She is especially pleased with the fact that it is the parents themselves who recognized that they needed help in child rearing.

“They mainly pointed to their children’s negative behaviour patterns that they were not able to address properly – they did not know what methods to use to calm them down or to set the rules. Once they started to gradually learn things, the parents noticed that they had in fact changed and improved themselves first, transferring the positive change to their children only afterwards,” Šaćirović explains.

Nusret and Miranda conclude that nobody is perfect, which applies to parents as well. They, however, try to be as good as possible and to make sure that all the decisions they make are in the best interest of their children.

With the support of UNICEF, European Union and Austrian Development Agency, the “Parenting for Lifelong Health” programme is being implemented in five municipalities in Montenegro as of 2018. The programme was developed and tested through the cooperation of UNICEF with the World Health Organization and universities in Great Britain and South Africa. In addition to Montenegro, it is also being implemented in various countries across the globe, including the Czech Republic, Romania and Northern Macedonia.