Child rights and business principles (CRBP)

The first comprehensive set of principles to guide companies on the full range of actions they can take in the workplace, marketplace and community to respect and support children’s rights.

A girls sits with arms crossed over her school desk, her face lit up by sun
UNICEF Mongolia/2017/Mungunkhishig B.

Partnerships

Key results of UNICEF/ Government of Mongolia cooperation cycle 2012-2016

Improved the enabling environment on CRBP through:

  • The situation analysis of CSR in Mongolia was undertaken with focus on public and private sectors including legal and policy framework.  
  • National Release of Children’s Rights and Business Principles developed by UNICEF, the UN Global Compact and Save the Children – a comprehensive guide on how companies can respect and support children’s rights in the workplace, marketplace and community through business practices and CSR.
  • Partnerships, capacity building and technical assistance to business platforms, NGOs and key industries (IT, cashmere, mining and financial) on the child rights and business principles. This included UNICEF’s partnership with the Mongolian National Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and Business Council of Mongolia.
  • Technical inputs to the Ministry of Mining in the development of the Model Community Development Agreement (CDA), to ensure children are considered as rights holders in the development by mining companies with local authorities of local level CDA’s.

Specific results in 2016

  • Created awareness and institutional leadership on Children’s Rights and Business Practices (CRBP) in the private sector through delivery of introductory and intermediate CRBP training to one business platform, two companies and one INGO working with the textile and construction sectors.
  • Promoted better understanding of the State obligations regarding the impact of business on children’s rights through delivery of introductory training on General Comment 16 to key government stakeholders in health, nutrition, ECD and WASH.
  • Promoted companies’ implementation of workplace-focused CRBP through provision of sector specific technical assistance, e.g. to the cashmere sector, resulting in establishment of breastfeeding spaces and education of employees on child health and nutrition.

Leveraged corporate investment in children’s rights through partnerships, including:

  • Ongoing collaboration with two financial institutions, which led to the replication of UNICEF Mongolia’s WASH container model at a kindergarten in a UNICEF geographic focus area;
  • A child-online protection/innovation based partnership with Mongolia’s largest mobile/IT service provider, including its distribution of child online protection information, dissemination of rights SMS messages, investment in school WASH containers and key role in the UNICEF-led youth Innovation Challenge;
  • A collaboration between University of Waterloo Canada, UNICEF Mongolia and two Mongolian internet content companies on the Innovation Challenge on adolescent mental and sexual reproductive health, which aims to apply technological innovation to social challenges with active the participation of Mongolian youth.
  • A research based partnership with UNICEF PFP/CRBU to assess the impacts of project-induced in-migration associated with the mining industry. This country study, conducted with four mining companies forms an evidence base for advocacy with government and the mining sector, while specific recommendations delivered to the four companies provides a framework for UNICEF programmatic interventions and roadmaps for company actions in the medium-term.

As part of a new Country programme 2017-2021, UNICEF Mongolia is further increasing its efforts to partner with the country’s growing private sector, now accounting for 75 per cent of the GDP (World Bank, 2014). UNICEF builds strategic partnerships to influence corporate social responsibility – especially with major industries such as mining, ICT and banking to leverage its potential in achieving results for children and replication of successful interventions. Moreover, the programme will help promote and support child friendly business practices through the implementation of the Child Rights and Business Principles.

To achieve this aim, UNICEF’s strategic interventions to mainstream CRBP into businesses practices and companies’ social investments will include:

  • Building awareness and knowledge of the private sector on CRBP through cooperation with business capacity building institutions.
  • Partnerships and cooperation with business champions, leading companies as well as business platforms, associations to promote CRBP, leverage resources and expertise for most needed programmatic areas and disadvantaged communities. 
  • Review CRBP related policy and legal environment. Discuss with the Government, the private sector and other key stakeholders on key findings from the review and agree on an action plan to enhance environment for the private sector for realization of children’s rights in businesses.

UNICEF actions

    Improved the enabling environment on CRBP through:

    • The situation analysis of CSR in Mongolia was undertaken with focus on public and private sectors including legal and policy framework.  
    • National Release of Children’s Rights and Business Principles developed by UNICEF, the UN Global Compact and Save the Children – a comprehensive guide on how companies can respect and support children’s rights in the workplace, marketplace and community through business practices and CSR.
    • Partnerships, capacity building and technical assistance to business platforms, NGOs and key industries (IT, cashmere, mining and financial) on the child rights and business principles. This included UNICEF’s partnership with the Mongolian National Chamber of Commerce and Industry (MNCCI), and Business Council of Mongolia (BCM).

       

      The strategy of collaboration

      The Strategy of collaboration with private sector on air pollution:

      • Continue to engage with the BCM, MNCCI and other network of businesses to influence private sector companies spend more resources on helping protect children from some of the most immediate threats, as well as on longer term change and investments in reducing air pollution.
      • Provide technical guidance to companies that as part of their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) strategy wish to invest in clean air and energy efficiency in kindergartens and health facilities towards the most effective immediate results for protecting children and maximizing the potential of Child Rights and Business Principles (CRBP).