18 January 2023

The role of the private sector in providing incentives for vaccine uptake during the COVID-19 pandemic

The study “THE ROLE OF THE PRIVATE SECTOR IN PROVIDING INCENTIVES FOR VACCINE UPTAKE DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC” was carried out in March – July 2022 in the Republic of Moldova. The purpose of the analysis was to contribute to understanding how private sector in Moldova addressed the challenges of COVID-19 and accelerated roll-out of the COVID-19 vaccine. The COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on businesses and population alike. A significant number of businesses experienced a drop in sales and reduction in workforce, with many businesses closing altogether. The largest negative impact was experienced in the services sector, particularly small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the sector. SMEs in wholesale and retail trade, transportation and storage and hospitality sectors have the biggest shared contribution to the overall Moldovan economy.1 These are also the sectors that have been strongly affected by the pandemic. Health and family needs, restrictions on mobility and unemployment through decreased economic activity have reshaped the working population. Women in the Republic of Moldova were already vulnerable before the pandemic, and the pandemic exacerbated the existing gender inequality. Although participation of women in the labor force is lower in the Republic of Moldova than that of men, the impact of COVID-19 has been heavier on women in terms of job losses. According to the World Bank Enterprise Survey, 2021, despite a relatively strong reliance in the services sector for female workers during the crisis, the recovery process has been more favorable for male workers. Businesses have an important role in addressing the challenges of COVID-19 and accelerating roll-out of the COVID-19 vaccine. Businesses in the Republic of Moldova have contributed financial resources, assets and innovation ranging from purchases of personal protective equipment, to awareness campaigns, to solutions for provision of education and healthcare services. They have also introduced protective measures to protect the health of their workforces, as well as taking measures to promote adoption of vaccines by employees. Although much progress has been made in accelerating delivery of COVID-19 vaccines in the Republic of Moldova, there remains the final hurdle of ensuring sufficient uptake. Employers are uniquely positioned to support vaccine adoption, and can do so by building conviction and making vaccination as convenient and costless to employees as possible.
18 January 2023

Business impact analysis on the realization of children’s rights in the Republic of Moldova

The Business Impact Analysis (BIA) on the Realization of Children’s Rights in the Republic of Moldova, which was carried out in January–July 2022, is the first such research in Moldova. The purpose of the analysis was to contribute to understanding the extent to which children’s rights are recognized in the business sector and as a practice of corporate social responsibility. The main purpose of this report was to conduct a human-rights based analysis to assess the impact of the Republic of Moldova’s business sector on children’s rights. The analysis examines the key areas and sectors of the economy, and the potential and actual impacts of business on children’s rights in the country, with a focus on the most vulnerable children. Economic activity in the Republic of Moldova is concentrated in the service sectors. The service sector, tourism, transport, and communications have grown rapidly over the 2000–2020 period, while retail and wholesale trade has benefitted from remittance-fuelled domestic demand and intraregional trade. Based on the national statistics for 2021, retail accounted for about 18 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP), followed by Manufacturing (17 per cent), Construction (11 per cent) and agriculture (11 per cent). Corporate sustainability, human rights and children’s rights in business principles remains undeveloped in the Republic of Moldova. Current legislation does not provide sufficient incentives to address the impact of business on the rights and well-being of children. The analysis focused on key impacts on children’s rights by examining the following key sectors of the economy: information communication technology (ICT), financial services, food and agribusiness, retail, Hospitality, Energy and Transport sectors. Key issues causing child rights deprivations which can be impacted by the business sector, as identified based on the findings of the UNICEF’s Situation Analysis of children and adolescents in the Republic of Moldova, 2022 and challenges identified in the Voluntary National Review of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Implementation (2020)1, include: Higher poverty levels of households with children (SDG 1) Violence against children (SDG 8) Territorial Inequalities in education (SDG 10) Adolescent Health and Wellbeing (SDG 3) Safe and secure working environment and family friendly practices (SDG 8) Poor nutritional status of population (SDG2) Knowledge and skills required for decent jobs and entrepreneurship (SDG 4) Access to sanitation and safe and quality drinking water (SDG 6). Key impacts in the workplace, the marketplace and the community and the environment are linked with children’s rights deprivations identified in the situation analysis.