The fuel behind child rights

Last year, UNICEF purchased 2.3 million litres of fuel to schools in Lebanon. This means that all children in 570 schools had access to lighting and heating even in the depth of winter, helping ensure that their right to education is protected.

Raquel Fernandez
Children in a school
UNICEFLebanon/2018

12 April 2019

Can we guess if or how schools could work with no electricity? And no heater during the cold winter? The lack of heating and light is a major disincentive for children to attend school, increasing their risk of dropping out. UNICEF, in partnership with the Ministry of Education and Higher Education (MEHE) and our donors, work together to ensure that schools in Lebanon provide the environment that children need to learn.

That is why we provide fuel to schools, as part of our work to prevent the dropout of the most vulnerable girls and boys enrolled in the formal education whose education-related costs are subsidized. UNICEF has provided fuel to schools in 7 mohafazat (districts) since 2016, with an 18 per cent increase each year. Last year, UNICEF purchased 2.3 million litres of fuel to schools in Lebanon. This means that all children in 570 schools had access to lighting and heating even in the depth of winter, helping ensure that their right to education is protected, and they don’t miss out on the opportunities that only education can bring.

So, when we talk about achieving results for children, regardless of nationality or status, we are talking about putting fuel into school tanks, distributing winter clothes for children battling the storm or supplying safe water to 185,000 people, among the many activities that lead to the results. Along with this, UNICEF provides ongoing support to the Government of Lebanon through technical and financial assistance to strengthen the education, health and child protection systems and services to improve the access of the most vulnerable children to their rights.

 

Last year, UNICEF purchased 2.3 million litres of fuel to schools in Lebanon. This means that all children in 570 schools had access to lighting and heating even in the depth of winter, helping ensure that their right to education is protected, and they don’t miss out on the opportunities that only education can bring.

A child learning how to write the letter D.
UNICEFLebanon/2018

We are all responsible for the progress of children’s rights, from providing fuel to schools, to supporting quality and sufficient services for all children; from changing behaviours, to ending violence against girls and boys; from protecting the most disadvantaged to empowering the young people. It’s a team job, with our partners, donors and the communities we serve.         

But this is not a solitary task: given the many pieces that have to come together to, for example, deliver fuel to schools, UNICEF could never be effective if we had to implement each piece of this puzzle ourselves. We work with all actors who are co-responsible for delivering results to those most vulnerable children, from governmental authorities and the international community to Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO), communities and families.

We are all responsible for the progress of children’s rights, from providing fuel to schools, to supporting quality and sufficient services for all children; from changing behaviours, to ending violence against girls and boys; from protecting the most disadvantaged to empowering the young people. It’s a team job, with our partners, donors and the communities we serve.         

Thank you for making it possible to ensure that fuel reaches the schools where it is most needed, protecting education and children’s rights. We at UNICEF acknowledge every person behind each partnership and all our donors for playing their crucial part in achieving the results that our joint commitment and efforts deliver to the most vulnerable children in Lebanon.   

 

Children in a school bus.
UNICEFLebanon/2018