Amongst the demining teams, one stands out: Lebanon’s women deminers.

Using hand-metal detectors, deminers scans the ground for mines clearing hundreds of thousands of unexploded in south Lebanon. Lebanese and international demining teams risk their lives every day.

Sandra Sara Chehab
A metal detector is used to find cluster munition in Nabatieh, Lebanon.
Diego Ibarra Sánchez
03 May 2016

Using hand-metal detectors deminers scans the ground for mines clearing hundreds of thousands of unexploded in south Lebanon. Despite progress achieved in mine clearance, considerable areas of land still remain contaminated with mines and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW). Lebanese and international demining teams risk lives every day continuing the demining efforts.

On a sunny day in late March, women deminers went out to southern Lebanon to clear minefields. After a morning briefing by the Lebanese Mine Action Center officer in Nabatieh, they started clearing hundreds of thousands of unexploded cluster bomb sub-munitions.

A female deminers group during the morning briefing of LMAG in Nabatieh. Deminers in south Lebanon clearing hundreds of thousands of unexploded Israeli-dropped cluster bomb sub-munitions. The munitions contained in cluster bombs, if they do not explode immediately, are still able to kill and mutilate long after they have been dropped. Nabatieh, Lebanon.
Diego Ibarra Sánchez

LANDMINE VICTIMS

3,847 people killed or injured, since 1975, as a result of Explosive Remnants of War (ERW). The number of casualties peaked in 2006, with 209 people killed or injured between August and December. Through a comprehensive mine action programme, the number of deaths and injuries was reduced to 6 people in 2011. Children both boys and girls are still affected with 40 children under 12 years of age and 75 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 18 killed or injured since 2006 .

In 2015 twenty three persons including children were injured by a mine explosion.

Cristel, 53 years old, holds the portrait of his husband, Michelle. He died on December 1998 after one cluster munition exploited on the road while he was driving. Cristel is mother of 3 daughters and 2 sons. The youngest one has the father name. He never met him.  March 2016. Anan´s village, Jizzin. Lebanon.
Diego Ibarra Sánchez

UNICEF is the UN focal point for Mine Risk Education (MRE). UNICEF is working with Lebanon Mine Action Centre (LMAC) and Balamand University to teach children and their families how to live safely in contaminated areas until the lethal threat can be cleared permanently. UNICEF also supports the landmine survivors, and others who are injured and disabled. UNICEF’s activities are an essential and integral part of a broader sector that is called ‘Mine Action’ which deals with Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) in a comprehensive way including demining, victim assistance, stockpile destruction and advocacy.

Thanks to the governments of Germany and Canada for ensuring that communities in Lebanon are aware of the risks from mines. Their generous contribution enables UNICEF and our implementing partner LMAC to reduce the risk of injury from mines and unexploded ordnance and to prevent devastating accidents.

Deminers in south Lebanon clearing hundreds of thousands of unexploded Israeli-dropped cluster bomb sub-munitions. The munitions contained in cluster bombs, if they do not explode immediately, are still able to kill and mutilate long after they have been dropped. Nabatieh, Lebanon.
Diego Ibarra Sánchez