13 January 2024

Strategies to end violence against children

Go to:  Home Parenting  |  Early learning Early learning  |  Nurturing care Nurturing care  |  Health Health  |  Security and protection Security and protection  |  Short masterclasses for parents and caregivers Short masterclasses for parents and caregivers In Latin America and the Caribbean, approximately two in three children are victims of…, Ending violence against children, Ending violence against children 1-Ending violence against children Daviron 2023 Ending violence against children 2-Ending violence against children Daviron 2023 Ending violence against children 3-Ending violence against children Daviron 2023 Ending violence against children 5-Ending violence against children Daviron 2023 Ending violence against…, Nurturing the well-being of parents and caregivers, Nurturing 2-2-Nurturing Daviron 2023 Nurturing 2-3-Nurturing Daviron 2023 Nurturing 2-4-Nurturing Daviron 2023 Nurturing 2-5-Nurturing Daviron 2023 Nurturing 2-6-Nurturing Daviron 2023 Nurturing 2-7-Nurturing Daviron 2023 Nurturing 2-8-Nurturing Daviron 2023 Nurturing Nurturing Nurturing Nurturing Nurturing Nurturing Nurturing child 3-2-child…, We can all contribute to end violence against children, contribute 5-1-contribute Daviron 2023 contribute 5-2-contribute Daviron 2023 contribute 5-3-contribute Daviron 2023 contribute 5-4-contribute Daviron 2023 contribute 5-5-contribute Daviron 2023 contribute 5-6-contribute Daviron 2023 contribute contribute contribute contribute contribute contribute
19 October 2023

How to talk to your children about conflict and war

Home Parenting  |  Food and nutrition Food and nutrition  |  Early learning Early learning  |  Nurturing care Nurturing care  |  Health Health  |  Security and protection Security and protection  |  Short masterclasses for parents and caregivers Short masterclasses for parents and caregivers When conflict or war makes the headlines, it can cause…, 1. Find out what they know and how they feel, Choose a time and place when you can bring it up naturally and your child is more likely to feel comfortable talking freely, such as during a family meal. Try to avoid talking about the topic just before bedtime. A good starting point is to ask your child what they know and how they are feeling. Some children might know little about what is…, 2. Keep it calm and age-appropriate, Children have a right to know what’s going on in the world, but adults also have a responsibility to keep them safe from distress. You know your child best. Use age-appropriate language, watch their reactions, and be sensitive to their level of anxiety. It is normal if you feel sad or worried about what is happening as well. But keep in mind that…, 3. Spread compassion, not stigma, Conflict can often bring with it prejudice and discrimination, whether against a people or country. When talking to your children, avoid labels like “bad people” or “evil” and instead use it as an opportunity to encourage compassion, such as for the families forced to flee their homes. Even if a conflict is happening in a distant country, it can…, 4. Focus on the helpers, It’s important for children to know that people are helping each other with acts of courage and kindness. Find positive stories, such as the first responders assisting people, or young people calling for peace. The sense of doing something, no matter how small, can often bring great comfort. See if your child would like to participate in taking…, 5. Close conversations with care, As you end your conversation, it’s important to make sure that you are not leaving your child in a state of distress. Try to assess their level of anxiety by watching their body language, considering whether they’re using their usual tone of voice and watching their breathing. Remind them that you care and that you’re there to listen and support…, 6. Continue to check in, As news of the conflict continues, you should continue to check in with your child to see how they’re doing. How are they feeling? Do they have any new questions or things they would like to talk about with you? If your child seems worried or anxious about what’s happening, keep an eye out for any changes in how they behave or feel, such as…, 7. Limit the flood of news, Be mindful of how exposed your children are to the news while it's full of alarming headlines and upsetting images. Consider switching off the news around younger children. With older children, you could use it as an opportunity to discuss how much time they spend consuming news and what news sources they trust. Also consider how you talk about…, 8. Take care of yourself, You’ll be able to help your kids better if you’re coping, too. Children will pick up on your own response to the news, so it helps them to know that you are calm and in control. If you’re feeling anxious or upset, take time for yourself and reach out to other family, friends and trusted people. Be mindful of how you’re consuming news: Try…
12 February 2022

How to support your child through reopening

Home Parenting  | Food and nutrition Food and nutrition  | Early learning Early learning  | Nurturing care Nurturing care  | Health Health | Security and protection Security and protection  |  Short masterclasses for parents and caregivers Short masterclasses for parents and caregivers Through the COVID-19 pandemic, family life for many has been…, What does separation anxiety look like?, Separation anxiety may show up as crying and being more clingy when you leave your child (even for a short period of time) or when they are faced with new situations. It happens most between the ages of 6 months and 3 years and is a common part of your child’s development. The stress and uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic mean that such…, How can I help my child to feel safe making the transition back to old routines?, Helping your child transition to going back to school, and you going back to work, may be a process which takes time and planning. To make the separation less difficult for your child, try some of these tips: Listen to your child Take their worries seriously and talk to them about their concerns. With younger children, you could try play-acting…, My child is scared to go back to school. How can I help him feel at ease?, Some children may feel nervous or reluctant to return to school, especially if they have been learning at home for months. Be honest – for example you could go through the changes they may expect at school. Reassure them about safety measures in place to help keep them and others safe. Let your child know that they can warm up slowly. They don't…, How can I check to see how my child is doing without overwhelming them?, Be proactive but be calm. Children often take their emotional cues from the key adults in their lives, so it’s important that you listen to child’s concerns, speak kindly and be reassuring. Be prepared that their emotions may change and let them know that this is completely okay. In terms of how to check in, a lot of that depends on your child. If…