24 November 2018

Guyana climate landscape analysis for children

The Report presents the climate, environment and energy situation in Guyana, Government responses to/priorities on CEE, the impact of CEE-related issues on children, child-inclusive CEE policies, strategies and programming, CEE funding landscape in Guyana, linkages of the UNICEF Country Programme to CEE and recommendations. A number of policies, strategies, and action plans to guide national responses to issues related to climate, energy and environment including the Draft Climate Resilient Strategy and Action Plan (CRSAP, 2015), Guyana’s Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs, 2015) and National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (NBSAP, 2012 -2020). In Guyana, children suffer from the negative impact of climate change, especially flooding in areas that prevent them from going to school. Stagnant pools of water cause mosquitoes to breed larvae which results in malaria and filaria- both of which are prevalent in the interior communities. This has an impact on children not attending school. On the other hand, during drought conditions, especially in the interior regions, the water level is extremely low; as a result schools remain closed. Even when children are allowed to attend school the heat is so intense that they become very restless and lack concentration. Heat waves will be of significant risk for children, particularly those living in urban settings where heat island effects may become more frequent due to increasing temperatures. It is noteworthy that infants are especially at risk because they cannot yet regulate their body temperature.
24 November 2018

Child-friendly regional profile

The Government of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana and the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) are committed to the wellbeing and development of Guyanese children. The Government at the national and sub-national levels is committed to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). UNICEF is the custodian or co-custodian of 10 of the SDG indicators (stunting, wasting/overweight, skilled attendance at birth, under five mortality, neonatal mortality, early childhood development, early marriage, FGM/C, child discipline and sexual violence against children). This commitment is demonstrated by their support for the generation and dissemination of evidence to inform the development of plans, policies, projects, and programmes to address equity gaps in areas of survival, lifelong learning, protection and participation of children. The Kanuku and Kamoa high-lands and the vast Rupununi savannahs make up the Upper Takutu-Upper Essequibo region. The forested Kanuku Mountains divide this Region in two subregions. The north savannahs are about 2,000 square miles in area and the south savannahs are 2,500 square miles. The population of this region is 24,238 persons, who live in scattered Indigenous villages and land settlement schemes. Because of the grassy savannahs, the Rupununi is considered to be ‘cattle country’. Most of the cattle are farmed to produce beef and a few are kept for milk. There are large ranches at Aishalton, Annai, Dadanawa and Karanambo. Much of the beef produced here is sold in neighbouring Brazil, because transportation to the other regions of Guyana, especially Region Four, is very expensive. The people of this region also mine semiprecious stones among the foothills of the Kamoa Mountains and among the Marundi Mountains. A wide variety of craft is produced in many of the 17 Indigenous villages and sold mainly to Brazil. In Region Nine, you can see the Giant River Otter, the Arapaima (the largest freshwater fish in the world) and the black Cayman.