12 April 2024

How to talk to your children about hate speech

👉 Follow us on WhatsApp Channels: Recibe información por WhatsApp UNICEF Parenting Hub  to get daily tips. You might also be interested in: Home Parenting  | Food and nutrition Food and nutrition  | Early learning Early learning  | Nurturing care Nurturing care  | Security and protection Security and protection  |  Short masterclasses for parents…, Hate speech facts, What is hate speech?, Hate speech can be described as any kind of communication in speech, writing or behaviour that attacks or discriminates against a person or group’s identity, such as religion, ethnicity, nationality, race, colour, descent, disability, age, gender or sexual orientation. Hate speech can also include other “identity factors”, like language, economic…, How are children affected by hate speech?, Children and young people are particularly vulnerable to hate speech, both online and in person. When children hear or read hate speech aimed at them directly or a part of their identity – such as their race, colour or gender – it can make them feel like there is something different or wrong about them. This can impact their self-esteem and can…, Hate speech vs free speech, Freedom of expression is a human right and tackling hate speech protects this right. It’s possible to disagree with or criticize an individual or group without threatening their well-being and safety. Hate speech limits freedom of expression as those targeted by hateful language do not feel safe expressing themselves freely., What is trolling?, “Trolling” is when someone posts or comments online to provoke a reaction from others. Trolling aims to disrupt, get attention and cause distress. It becomes hate speech when the actions promote hatred and discrimination against a person or group’s identity, such as their gender, race or sexual orientation. People involved in trolling will often…, How to talk to your children about hate speech, Conversations about issues like hate, racism, sexism and xenophobia can be uncomfortable for many parents. But it is important to try to create a safe space for your child to be able to speak to you and share anything that is on their mind. Conversations will look different for every family, but remember: You know your child best. Use age-…, 1. Educating your child about hate speech, Explain to your child that everyone has a right to be safe in society and treated with dignity and respect. Hate speech is always wrong and it’s on all of us to reject it. Explore together what hate speech is, so your child can identify it, whether it happens to them or someone else. Here are some questions you can explore together: What do you…, 2. Hate speech online, The Internet and social media enable us to connect with friends and family, pursue interests and be part of communities. Sadly, the same digital tools and platforms can also enable hateful content to be created easily, often anonymously, and shared widely fast. Hate speech has the potential to spread online to a global audience and can resurface…, 3. Talk openly and frequently to your children, The more you talk to your children about topics like hate speech, racism and xenophobia, the more comfortable they will be to come to you if they experience it. Find opportunities to talk about these topics in your daily routine. For example, if something relevant comes up on TV, you could ask your child what they know about the topic and what…, 4. Stand against hate speech, Remember that you are the example that your child follows and be mindful of your own words and actions, including online. Take every opportunity to reject hate speech and stand up for every person's right to be treated with dignity and respect. Explain to your child that if we witness hate speech, we can show support to the person or people…, 5. Embrace diversity, Explain to your child that we aren’t all the same and that is a good thing. The world would be a very boring place if everyone was the same. Encouraging openness and curiosity can help children to notice differences and appreciate them. It fosters conversation, understanding and empathy with people who are different from them. > Read: Talking…, What should I do if my child experiences hate speech?, All children have the right to protection from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse. Any incidents of hate speech need to be taken very seriously. Depending on the situation, you may need to report it to your child’s school, to the platform it happened on or to the police.  , Listen and reassure, If your child has experienced hate speech, the first step is to give them time to explain what happened. Listen carefully and tell them that you are glad they came to you. Focus on making them feel heard and supported. Your child is more likely to open up to you if you stay calm about what you hear. Be clear that hate speech is wrong and that your…, Hate speech at your child’s school, If the hate speech was from a student at your child’s school, record the evidence if possible and report it to the school. Discuss with the school authorities how they will protect your child’s right to be safe, as well as what consequences there will be for the sender of the hate speech. Discipline should always be immediate, non-violent and…, Hate speech from someone outside your child’s school, If the hate speech is from someone outside your child’s school, document any evidence and consider reporting it to the police. Don’t hesitate to speak to the police if you have any concerns for your child’s safety.  , Hate speech online, Record the evidence and report it to the social media platform. Check what tools are available on the platform/s to block or restrict the sender. Here are reporting and safety resources for many popular platforms: Facebook Instagram Kik Snapchat TikTok Tumblr WeChat WhatsApp X (formerly Twitter) YouTube
13 January 2024

Strategies to end violence against children

👉 Follow us on our WhatsApp channel:  Recibe información por WhatsApp UNICEF Parenting Portal  for more tips. You may also be interested in: Home Parenting  | Food and nutrition Food and nutrition  | Early learning Early learning  | Nurturing care Nurturing care  | Health Health | Security and protection Security and protection  |  Short…, Ending violence against children, Ending violence against children 1-Ending violence against children UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 Ending violence against children 2-Ending violence against children UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 Ending violence against children 3-Ending violence against children UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 Ending violence against children 5-Ending violence against children…, Nurturing the well-being of parents and caregivers, Nurturing 2-2-Nurturing UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 Nurturing 2-3-Nurturing UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 Nurturing 2-4-Nurturing UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 Nurturing 2-5-Nurturing UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 Nurturing 2-6-Nurturing UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 Nurturing 2-7-Nurturing UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 Nurturing 2-8-Nurturing UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023…, We can all contribute to end violence against children, contribute 5-1-contribute UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 contribute 5-2-contribute UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 contribute 5-3-contribute UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 contribute 5-4-contribute UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 contribute 5-5-contribute UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 contribute 5-6-contribute UNICEF LACRO/Daviron/2023 contribute contribute contribute…
19 October 2023

How to talk to your children about conflict and war

👉 Follow us on our WhatsApp channel:  Recibe información por WhatsApp UNICEF Parenting Portal  for more tips. You may also be interested in: Home Parenting  | Food and nutrition Food and nutrition  | Early learning Early learning  | Nurturing care Nurturing care  | Health Health | Security and protection Security and protection  |  Short…, 1. Find out what they know and how they feel, Choose a time and place when you can bring it up naturally and your child is more likely to feel comfortable talking freely, such as during a family meal. Try to avoid talking about the topic just before bedtime. A good starting point is to ask your child what they know and how they are feeling. Some children might know little about what is…, 2. Keep it calm and age-appropriate, Children have a right to know what’s going on in the world, but adults also have a responsibility to keep them safe from distress. You know your child best. Use age-appropriate language, watch their reactions, and be sensitive to their level of anxiety. It is normal if you feel sad or worried about what is happening as well. But keep in mind that…, 3. Spread compassion, not stigma, Conflict can often bring with it prejudice and discrimination, whether against a people or country. When talking to your children, avoid labels like “bad people” or “evil” and instead use it as an opportunity to encourage compassion, such as for the families forced to flee their homes. Even if a conflict is happening in a distant country, it can…, 4. Focus on the helpers, It’s important for children to know that people are helping each other with acts of courage and kindness. Find positive stories, such as the first responders assisting people, or young people calling for peace. The sense of doing something, no matter how small, can often bring great comfort. See if your child would like to participate in taking…, 5. Close conversations with care, As you end your conversation, it’s important to make sure that you are not leaving your child in a state of distress. Try to assess their level of anxiety by watching their body language, considering whether they’re using their usual tone of voice and watching their breathing. Remind them that you care and that you’re there to listen and support…, 6. Continue to check in, As news of the conflict continues, you should continue to check in with your child to see how they’re doing. How are they feeling? Do they have any new questions or things they would like to talk about with you? If your child seems worried or anxious about what’s happening, keep an eye out for any changes in how they behave or feel, such as…, 7. Limit the flood of news, Be mindful of how exposed your children are to the news while it's full of alarming headlines and upsetting images. Consider switching off the news around younger children. With older children, you could use it as an opportunity to discuss how much time they spend consuming news and what news sources they trust. Also consider how you talk about…, 8. Take care of yourself, You’ll be able to help your kids better if you’re coping, too. Children will pick up on your own response to the news, so it helps them to know that you are calm and in control. If you’re feeling anxious or upset, take time for yourself and reach out to other family, friends and trusted people. Be mindful of how you’re consuming news: Try…
12 February 2022

How to support your child through reopening

👉 Follow us on WhatsApp Channels: Recibe información por WhatsApp UNICEF Parenting Hub  to get daily tips. You might also be interested in: Home Parenting  | Food and nutrition Food and nutrition  | Early learning Early learning  | Nurturing care Nurturing care  | Health Health | Security and protection Security and protection  |  Short…, What does separation anxiety look like?, Separation anxiety may show up as crying and being more clingy when you leave your child (even for a short period of time) or when they are faced with new situations. It happens most between the ages of 6 months and 3 years and is a common part of your child’s development. The stress and uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic mean that such…, How can I help my child to feel safe making the transition back to old routines?, Helping your child transition to going back to school, and you going back to work, may be a process which takes time and planning. To make the separation less difficult for your child, try some of these tips: Listen to your child Take their worries seriously and talk to them about their concerns. With younger children, you could try play-acting…, My child is scared to go back to school. How can I help him feel at ease?, Some children may feel nervous or reluctant to return to school, especially if they have been learning at home for months. Be honest – for example you could go through the changes they may expect at school. Reassure them about safety measures in place to help keep them and others safe. Let your child know that they can warm up slowly. They don't…, How can I check to see how my child is doing without overwhelming them?, Be proactive but be calm. Children often take their emotional cues from the key adults in their lives, so it’s important that you listen to child’s concerns, speak kindly and be reassuring. Be prepared that their emotions may change and let them know that this is completely okay. In terms of how to check in, a lot of that depends on your child. If…
11 February 2022

How to support your child if you are concerned about their weight

👉 Follow us on WhatsApp Channels: Recibe información por WhatsApp UNICEF Parenting Hub  to get daily tips. You might also be interested in: Home Parenting  | Food and nutrition Food and nutrition  | Early learning Early learning  | Nurturing care Nurturing care  | Health Health | Security and protection Security and protection  |  Short…, Avoid blame , Young people can gain weight due to several reasons outside of their control or individual behaviour, often with complex causes. Children who struggle with their weight frequently experience bias, stigma and bullying. It’s critical to stay away from blaming your child, and instead try to understand the structural issues at play that encourage…, Have healthy conversations, In a fast-changing digital landscape, it is important to remain aware of threats to the mental health and well-being of your child as it relates to their confidence and body image issues. These can range from social media posts stereotyping weight or encouraging eating disorders, to the constant corporate marketing of unhealthy junk food targeting…, Focus on healthy behaviours, Unless advised by a health professional, focus on “health and a healthy goals” rather than weight loss. Healthy eating and physical activity behaviours do not become routine overnight. It takes time, effort and perseverance from you and your child to make changes that last. Any big, sudden alterations to your child’s diet and lifestyle are…
11 February 2022

How to raise a healthy eater

👉 Follow us on WhatsApp Channels: Recibe información por WhatsApp UNICEF Parenting Hub  to get daily tips. You might also be interested in: Home Parenting  | Food and nutrition Food and nutrition  | Early learning Early learning  | Nurturing care Nurturing care  | Health Health | Security and protection Security and protection  |  Short…, 1. Promote positive habits, Your little ones watch everything you do – including at mealtime. You can be a good role model by reaching for healthy foods, beverages and snacks yourself, and engaging in fun physical activity. Choosing to put healthy, whole foods on the table sets a great example for your child. Try including your children in food shopping and preparation. They…, 2. Maintain a healthy relationship with food, Having a healthy mindset around eating is key for lifelong health and protecting against illnesses like heart disease, cancer and diabetes. You can help guide your young child by: Helping them understand whether they are physically hungry. This will help them to become in tune with their body’s needs. Staying away from using food as a reward or…, 3. Let go of “clean your plate!”, Although you might think this could help your child get the nutrients needed from food, these behaviours can lead to disliking foods and having negative associations with mealtime. If you can’t get your child to eat their veggies, try to have them see you eating and enjoying them yourself. Your little one learns about food choices from you, so try…, 4. Make portion control a priority, Oversized portions can lead to weight gain, so it is important to teach your children about how much food they should have on their plate. An easy way to teach your child about child-portion sizes is to use visuals for example: A closed fist is recommended for a portion of pasta, rice or cereal. A meat portion should be about as big as their palm…, 5. Start the day with a healthy breakfast, Mornings can be a rush for many families, but starting the day with a balanced meal helps your child get the important nutrients – such as calcium and fibre – needed for their growth and development. Try to create breakfasts with nutrient-dense ingredients like plain yoghurt and fresh fruit instead of sweetened cereals or pastries, which tend to…, 6. Make activity fun, Children need at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Why not join in the fun? Try to plan family activities that get everyone moving such as after-dinner walks or swimming. And be spontaneous when you see an opportunity, like dancing together when a favourite song comes on the radio. It is also important to encourage your child to limit…