06 July 2018

Do you want to become a UNICEF volunteer?

Do you want to join UNICEF as our volunteer?, In 2023, UNICEF in Kyrgyzstan enrolled volunteers from the following locations: Naryn oblast: Kochkor, Jumgal, Naryn, Ak-Tala, At-Bashi districts and the city of Naryn; Jalal-Abad oblast: Ala-Buka, Bazar-Korgon, Tash-Komur, Nooken, Suzak districts; Osh oblast: Nookat, Aravan, Chon-Alai, Alai, Uzgen, Kara-Suu, Kara-Kuldzha districts; Batken oblast…, Program Overview ,   Capacity Building Training  Simulation exercises within the "Safe School" Project Raising awareness campaigns U-Report Platform for the youth and adolescents #YourVoiceMatters, The scope of work and key tasks, Disaster Risk Reduction: Supporting disaster preparedness training activities and conducting simulation exercises in schools within Safe School Project Raising awareness of COVID-19 prevention measures U-Report Promotion campaign Participation in public events and promoting child rights and their wellbeing,  How to apply?, To become a UNICEF volunteer, the applicant has to meet the following criteria: Age A candidate is supposed to be between 16 – 50 years old Education and experience The applicant must have secondary education or a bachelor’s degree; Relevant volunteer or work experience is desirable. Skills Fluency in Kyrgyz and Russian languages is required.…, Frequently Asked Questions, How much time should be devoted to volunteering? Volunteers are encouraged to devote an average of 60 hours per month to volunteering. Study and volunteering could be easily combined. Will I receive any financial reward? A major benefit for a UNICEF volunteer is gaining experience and supporting programs for the safety and wellbeing of children.…
16 January 2018

In south Kyrgyzstan, multilingual education is path to opportunity and inclusion

Having biology, history, and other subjects taught in three different languages might seem like too much of a learning challenge. But students at this secondary school in Kyrgyzstan’s southern city of Osh are tackling the challenge, and asking for more. ‘We did have difficulties understanding Kyrgyz and Russian in the beginning, but it’s good now…,  , Target languages, There are altogether 41 classes at the school, and 14 of them are part of the program. ‘Multilingual’ here does not mean having a lot of language classes; rather, teachers use more than one language in each class teaching regular subjects. For example, a class may be divided in three parts, and the most challenging part – for example, when new…,  , Key to integration, In 2010, Kyrgyzstan’s south saw clashes between ethnic Kyrgyz and Uzbeks, with several hundred people killed and over 200,000 displaced. The unrest was centered on the city of Osh. Since then, a successful peace recovery has led to relative political stability. Nevertheless, the political situation remains precarious. UNICEF Kyrgyzstan, with…, Fear of the future, Before deciding to participate, the school consulted with all parents and children, explains Hidoyat Abylkasimova, one of the teachers: ‘We found that both parents and children were very eager to learn. It wasn’t merely a wish, but a need to gain a better education, to secure a better job in the future. Everybody here have fear of the future, so…,  , Adapting to challenges, The new methodology came with challenges for the teachers: ‘It was very difficult to explain terminologies in the different subjects in Kyrgyz and Russian’, says Abylkasimova, who has been a teacher now for 28 years. ‘We had to turn to dictionaries all the time. To be honest, in the beginning, the quality of the classes was not good.’ As the…,  , Peacebuilding impact, ‘After we began the multilingual education, we have seen many positive results, that help eliminate many of the problems that led to the conflict in 2010’, notes Kadyrova, the principal. ‘For our school, a very positive sign is that we have started getting students from other ethnicities. Now we have 14-15 from other groups, mostly in primary…