06 October 2022

Madura’s historic breakthrough brings hope for children

As September approaches on the island of Madura, the leaves begin to fall, the grass dries up and the dust scatters in the wind. The arid soil and scant rainfall make the heat of the dry season feel even more oppressive.  Amid the unfriendly weather, Alfiatun, a middle-aged woman, shows up at a small mosque in Kalianget, Sumenep — one of four…, Aunties are the key , Since August, Alfiatun has been setting aside 20 to 30 minutes towards the end of her weekly sermon to provide information on immunization. UNICEF and the district government reached out to her for support before the launch of BIAN – a nationwide immunization catch up campaign to address the major backslide in immunization after COVID-19.   As a…, GRIDU: Breaking the iceberg , Alfiatun is not operating alone – there are nearly five thousand aunties like her in Sumenep who are advocating for child vaccination during BIAN as part of the GRIDU (Integrated Immunization Massive Action) initiative.  "GRIDU was taken from our local language which means noisy and boisterous, reflecting our massive and integrated action,"…, How You Can Help, Thanks to the generous support in Indonesia and the cooperation of the public and local officials, UNICEF is able to ensure that routine immunization continues. As many as 67 million children in the world have not received a single routine vaccine during the pandemic. Therefore, UNICEF continues to move to assure that children are protected from…
11 August 2021

How to talk to your friends and family about COVID-19 vaccines

Vaccines save 2 to 3 million lives each year and are amongst the greatest advances of modern medicine. The development of safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines is a huge step forward in our global effort to end the pandemic. This is exciting news, but there are still some people who are skeptical or hesitant about COVID-19 vaccines. Chances are you…, Do connect with their values., Even if you are feeling frustrated, it is important to be empathetic. “Make them feel heard,” advises Omer. Attempt to connect with their underlying sentiment. For example, if they are tired of being kept from doing the things they want to do because of COVID-19, connect with them on the fact that places they enjoy will begin to open up again if…, Don’t interrupt., Make sure not to cut off, speak over or jump into correcting your loved one. Listen to the person you are talking to and meet them where they are. “You shouldn’t agree with any false information, but you should empathize and continue the process rather than ending your relationship or ending the conversation,” says Omer., Do help them feel empowered., Right now, many people are scared. The pandemic has completely transformed our lives. Omer suggests giving your loved one an empowering message: You can do something about this disease. Remind them that they can help change their own trajectory and their loved ones’ trajectories in this pandemic by getting vaccinated. “[They] can do something…, Don’t focus on the myths., “Be careful about countering a misperception too directly,” says Omer. The discussion shouldn’t be all or mostly about addressing a specific myth because there will always be more myths that follow. Calling attention to a myth can also backfire by making the myth more memorable than the facts. But sometimes, you cannot get out of addressing…, Do assume they are going to get vaccinated., Simply say to your friend or family member, “Let’s go get vaccinated!” This method is called presumptive communication. “The announcement approach or presumptive approach has been shown to be successful in the clinic and is likely to work in personal communication,” says Omer. You’re not taking away someone’s autonomy, all you are doing is…, Don’t get discouraged., Convincing someone who is opposed to vaccines is a long process. “It’s extremely tough,” says Omer. Remember that for those who are strongly opposed to vaccines in general, their opinions will not likely be changed in one conversation. The important thing? “Maintain a connection with them.” Interview and article by Mandy Rich, Digital Content…
01 July 2021

What you need to know before, during and after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine

Millions of people around the world have now been safely vaccinated against COVID-19, bringing us all one step closer to getting back to doing more of the things we enjoy with the people we love. For many the COVID-19 vaccines couldn’t come fast enough, but others understandably have questions about the vaccination process and what to expect when…, Before you go, Do your research. There’s a lot of misinformation about vaccines online, so it’s important to always get your information from trustworthy sources like UNICEF and WHO. If you have any questions about whether you should receive a COVID-19 vaccine, speak to your doctor. At present, people with the following health conditions should not receive a…, During the appointment, Stay safe. Make sure to follow safety precautions at the vaccination facility such as physical distancing while waiting and wearing a mask. Communicate. Let the health care professional know if you have any medical conditions that could be considered precautions, such as pregnancy or a compromised immune system. Keep your records. You should…, After you’ve been vaccinated, Stay for monitoring. The health care provider should observe you for about 15 minutes after the vaccine is administered to make sure you don’t have any immediate reactions. However, it is extremely rare for severe health reactions. Be prepared for some side effects. Vaccines are designed to give you immunity without the dangers of getting the…