Child Protection

Standard operating Procedures

Strengthening child protection systems

 

Standard operating Procedures

Student's Manual

Mapping Report Summary

Facilitator's Guide

Procedure for investigations involving child victims and/or witnesses

Procedure for handling children in conflict with the law

UNICEF Ghana has been supporting Ghana Police Service for the implementation of the “Integrating Child-Friendly Policing into the Ghana Police Service” initiative. The work on the initiative started back in 2014 with a comprehensive mapping study commissioned by the Ghana Police Service and UNICEF Ghana and undertaken by the International Bureau for Children’s Rights (IBCR). The objective of the study was to collect information and data to map the existing system of juvenile justice and child protection, with a focus on the roles and responsibilities of the police and the institutions with which they interact to carry out their duties. As result of the exercise, the need for standards operating procedures for police and the development of the training material emerged. Two sets of Standards Operating Procedures for child-friendly policing have been completed, validated and printed in 2016; one for child offenders and the other one for child victims and witnesses of crimes. Facilitators and Trainees’ manuals was prepared which has been adopted and included in the curriculum of the National and Regional Police Training Schools in Ghana. By the end of 2017, over 5,000 police personnel have been trained on the child friendly policing initiative all across Ghana.

 

As part of the process to monitor and track what changes may have occurred as a result of the introduction of the child-friendly policing curriculum, pre- and post-training questionnaires were developed. These questionnaires were tested and refined during the pilot training and the Trainer of Trainers. The aim of administering the questionnaires was to assess the quality of teaching and learning in order to provide feedback to the Ghana Police Service and individual instructors for improvement, as well as making changes as needed to the curriculum tools, especially the Facilitator’s Guide. Each police training institution was given copies of the questionnaires with instructions to administer them before teaching began and to do the same at the completion of the entire curriculum. Even though the questionnaires were administered to all police recruits in training before and after the training, an average sample of 15 pre- and post-training questionnaires (75 total questionnaires from 5 training schools) were randomly selected from each school for the analysis, due to the large number recruits. The analysis indicate positive changes in the knowledge of the police personnel related to child rights and the right of children in contact with the law.

 

Here are some key document:

  1. Mapping Report: Integrating Child-Friendly Policing into the Ghana Police Service
  2. Facilitators’ Guide on Integrating Child-Friendly Policing into the Ghana Police Service: Part of the Toolkit NPTS/RPTS Curriculum
  3. Trainees’ Guide on Integrating Child-Friendly Policing into the Ghana Police Service: Part of the Toolkit NPTS/RPTS Curriculum
  4. Standard Operating Procedures for Child-Friendly Policing - Procedures for Investigations Involving Child Victims and/or Witnesses
  5. Standard Operating Procedures for Child-Friendly Policing - Procedures for Handling Children in Conflict with the Law

Student's Manual

Mapping Report Summary

Facilitator's Guide

Procedure for investigations involving child victims and/or witnesses

Procedure for handling children in conflict with the law

 

 
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