10 January 2024

How to talk to your children about hate speech

Hate speech has a long history, but the growth of online communications means that it can now spread far and fast. Whether in person or online, almost all children and young people will encounter hate speech at some time. As a parent, it’s important to talk to your child about hate speech, to help them recognize it and know what to do when they…, Hate speech facts, What is hate speech?, Hate speech can be described as any kind of communication in speech, writing or behaviour that attacks or discriminates against a person or group’s identity, such as religion, ethnicity, nationality, race, colour, descent, disability, age, gender or sexual orientation. Hate speech can also include other “identity factors”, like language, economic…, How are children affected by hate speech?, Children and young people are particularly vulnerable to hate speech, both online and in person. When children hear or read hate speech aimed at them directly or a part of their identity – such as their race, colour or gender – it can make them feel like there is something different or wrong about them. This can impact their self-esteem and can…, Hate speech vs free speech, Freedom of expression is a human right and tackling hate speech protects this right. It’s possible to disagree with or criticize an individual or group without threatening their well-being and safety. Hate speech limits freedom of expression as those targeted by hateful language do not feel safe expressing themselves freely., What is trolling?, “Trolling” is when someone posts or comments online to provoke a reaction from others. Trolling aims to disrupt, get attention and cause distress. It becomes hate speech when the actions promote hatred and discrimination against a person or group’s identity, such as their gender, race or sexual orientation. People involved in trolling will often…, How to talk to your children about hate speech, Conversations about issues like hate, racism, sexism and xenophobia can be uncomfortable for many parents. But it is important to try to create a safe space for your child to be able to speak to you and share anything that is on their mind.  Conversations will look different for every family, but remember: You know your child best. Use age-…, 1. Educating your child about hate speech, Explain to your child that everyone has a right to be safe in society and treated with dignity and respect. Hate speech is always wrong and it’s on all of us to reject it. Explore together what hate speech is, so your child can identify it, whether it happens to them or someone else. Here are some questions you can explore together: What do you…, 2. Hate speech online, The Internet and social media enable us to connect with friends and family, pursue interests and be part of communities. Sadly, the same digital tools and platforms can also enable hateful content to be created easily, often anonymously, and shared widely fast. Hate speech has the potential to spread online to a global audience and can resurface…, 3. Talk openly and frequently to your children, The more you talk to your children about topics like hate speech, racism and xenophobia, the more comfortable they will be to come to you if they experience it. Find opportunities to talk about these topics in your daily routine. For example, if something relevant comes up on TV, you could ask your child what they know about the topic and what…, 4. Stand against hate speech, Remember that you are the example that your child follows and be mindful of your own words and actions, including online. Take every opportunity to reject hate speech and stand up for every person's right to be treated with dignity and respect. Explain to your child that if we witness hate speech, we can show support to the person or people…, 5. Embrace diversity, Explain to your child that we aren’t all the same and that is a good thing. The world would be a very boring place if everyone was the same. Encouraging openness and curiosity can help children to notice differences and appreciate them. It fosters conversation, understanding and empathy with people who are different from them. > Read: Talking…, What should I do if my child experiences hate speech?, All children have the right to protection from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse. Any incidents of hate speech need to be taken very seriously. Depending on the situation, you may need to report it to your child’s school, to the platform it happened on or to the police.  , Listen and reassure, If your child has experienced hate speech, the first step is to give them time to explain what happened. Listen carefully and tell them that you are glad they came to you. Focus on making them feel heard and supported. Your child is more likely to open up to you if you stay calm about what you hear. Be clear that hate speech is wrong and that your…, Hate speech at your child’s school, If the hate speech was from a student at your child’s school, record the evidence if possible and report it to the school. Discuss with the school authorities how they will protect your child’s right to be safe, as well as what consequences there will be for the sender of the hate speech. Discipline should always be immediate, non-violent and…, Hate speech from someone outside your child’s school, If the hate speech is from someone outside your child’s school, document any evidence and consider reporting it to the police. Don’t hesitate to speak to the police if you have any concerns for your child’s safety.  , Hate speech online, Record the evidence and report it to the social media platform. Check what tools are available on the platform/s to block or restrict the sender. Here are reporting and safety resources for many popular platforms: Facebook Instagram Kik Snapchat TikTok Tumblr WeChat WhatsApp X (formerly Twitter) YouTube
10 January 2024

How to talk to your children about hate speech

Hate speech has a long history, but the growth of online communications means that it can now spread far and fast. Whether in person or online, almost all children and young people will encounter hate speech at some time. As a parent, it’s important to talk to your child about hate speech, to help them recognize it and know what to do when they…, Hate speech facts, What is hate speech?, Hate speech can be described as any kind of communication in speech, writing or behaviour that attacks or discriminates against a person or group’s identity, such as religion, ethnicity, nationality, race, colour, descent, disability, age, gender or sexual orientation. Hate speech can also include other “identity factors”, like language, economic…, How are children affected by hate speech?, Children and young people are particularly vulnerable to hate speech, both online and in person. When children hear or read hate speech aimed at them directly or a part of their identity – such as their race, colour or gender – it can make them feel like there is something different or wrong about them. This can impact their self-esteem and can…, Hate speech vs free speech, Freedom of expression is a human right and tackling hate speech protects this right. It’s possible to disagree with or criticize an individual or group without threatening their well-being and safety. Hate speech limits freedom of expression as those targeted by hateful language do not feel safe expressing themselves freely., What is trolling?, “Trolling” is when someone posts or comments online to provoke a reaction from others. Trolling aims to disrupt, get attention and cause distress. It becomes hate speech when the actions promote hatred and discrimination against a person or group’s identity, such as their gender, race or sexual orientation. People involved in trolling will often…, How to talk to your children about hate speech, Conversations about issues like hate, racism, sexism and xenophobia can be uncomfortable for many parents. But it is important to try to create a safe space for your child to be able to speak to you and share anything that is on their mind.  Conversations will look different for every family, but remember: You know your child best. Use age-…, 1. Educating your child about hate speech, Explain to your child that everyone has a right to be safe in society and treated with dignity and respect. Hate speech is always wrong and it’s on all of us to reject it. Explore together what hate speech is, so your child can identify it, whether it happens to them or someone else. Here are some questions you can explore together: What do you…, 2. Hate speech online, The Internet and social media enable us to connect with friends and family, pursue interests and be part of communities. Sadly, the same digital tools and platforms can also enable hateful content to be created easily, often anonymously, and shared widely fast. Hate speech has the potential to spread online to a global audience and can resurface…, 3. Talk openly and frequently to your children, The more you talk to your children about topics like hate speech, racism and xenophobia, the more comfortable they will be to come to you if they experience it. Find opportunities to talk about these topics in your daily routine. For example, if something relevant comes up on TV, you could ask your child what they know about the topic and what…, 4. Stand against hate speech, Remember that you are the example that your child follows and be mindful of your own words and actions, including online. Take every opportunity to reject hate speech and stand up for every person's right to be treated with dignity and respect. Explain to your child that if we witness hate speech, we can show support to the person or people…, 5. Embrace diversity, Explain to your child that we aren’t all the same and that is a good thing. The world would be a very boring place if everyone was the same. Encouraging openness and curiosity can help children to notice differences and appreciate them. It fosters conversation, understanding and empathy with people who are different from them. > Read: Talking…, What should I do if my child experiences hate speech?, All children have the right to protection from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse. Any incidents of hate speech need to be taken very seriously. Depending on the situation, you may need to report it to your child’s school, to the platform it happened on or to the police.  , Listen and reassure, If your child has experienced hate speech, the first step is to give them time to explain what happened. Listen carefully and tell them that you are glad they came to you. Focus on making them feel heard and supported. Your child is more likely to open up to you if you stay calm about what you hear. Be clear that hate speech is wrong and that your…, Hate speech at your child’s school, If the hate speech was from a student at your child’s school, record the evidence if possible and report it to the school. Discuss with the school authorities how they will protect your child’s right to be safe, as well as what consequences there will be for the sender of the hate speech. Discipline should always be immediate, non-violent and…, Hate speech from someone outside your child’s school, If the hate speech is from someone outside your child’s school, document any evidence and consider reporting it to the police. Don’t hesitate to speak to the police if you have any concerns for your child’s safety.  , Hate speech online, Record the evidence and report it to the social media platform. Check what tools are available on the platform/s to block or restrict the sender. Here are reporting and safety resources for many popular platforms: Facebook Instagram Kik Snapchat TikTok Tumblr WeChat WhatsApp X (formerly Twitter) YouTube