05 March 2022

How to support your teen during stressful times

Whether you and your teen are getting along well or having challenges, it is important to show that you love and support them and remind yourselves how much you love each other. Here are some tips for helping your child navigate tough times – while taking care of yourself!  , Encourage your teen to share their feelings, Find ways to check in with your teen. Ask them how their day has been and what they have been doing. It could be by inviting them to join you in a task, such as cooking dinner, so you can use the time to chat about their day. Remind your teen that you are there for them, no matter what, and that you want to hear how they are feeling and what they…, Take time to support your teen, Work together on setting up new routines and setting achievable, daily goals as your circumstances may change with the changing context. Adolescence means independence! Try to give your teen the appropriate time and space to be on their own and take on more responsibility. Needing space is a normal part of growing up. Find a few ways you can…, Work through conflict between you and your teen, Listen to your teens’ views and try to sort out problems between you and your teen calmly. Remember: everyone can be stressed! Never discuss an issue while you are angry. Walk away, take a breath and calm down – you can talk with your teen about it later. Avoid power struggles. With the world feeling unpredictable right now, teens might be…, Take time to care for yourself, Caregivers have a lot to deal with. You also need care and support for yourself. Practicing self-care is also a good way of modelling self-care to your teen. Don’t wait too long to ask others for help if you are feeling overwhelmed. It is normal and okay to feel this way. Find a family member or someone you can talk with. Make time for your own…
12 May 2020

How COVID-19 Changed Lives - Voices of Children

Being a school student can sometimes be challenging, but the COVID-19 pandemic has made getting an education, and life in general, even more difficult for young people in Georgia. With schools closed, lessons are being held remotely. All sports, school activities, and events have been cancelled. Friendships and relationships have been transported…, Mate Dvalishvili, 15 years old, Kutaisi, The COVID-19 pandemic has radically changed my life. When I used to go to school, by the end of the day I would be exhausted – mentally as well as physically – and as a result, I did not have trouble falling asleep. Now, I don’t get tired enough during the day, so I can’t sleep at night, and I wake up late in the morning. That’s why I am sometimes…, Keta Tkhilaishvili, 10 years old, Batumi, My life has changed completely since my school was closed. Before, I spent most of the day at school with my classmates. Now, this is my free time. When I went to school, my schedule was really full. I got up early, prepared for school, and I also had extra classes like German, chess, circle dancing, and so on. Now my schedule is organized…, Sandro Turabelidze, 11 years old, Village Jimastaro, Imereti, During the pandemic I had to switch to distance or online school. I don’t find learning online difficult, it is easy. Before the class is over, teachers give us an assignment, we do the homework, take a photo of the exercise book, and send it to the teacher. During the next lesson the teacher tests our knowledge. When I have free time, I play with…, Elene Iashvili, 11 years old, Kvitiri, I live in the village of Kvitiri and I go to the Kutaisi Chess school. I had great plans this year. I was so excited to participate in the Georgia, Poti, Racha, and Tkibuli chess tournaments. Traveling around the country during tournaments is so much fun. We would go to the sea to relax after the game in Poti, and we would cozy up and enjoy the…, Luka Turabelidze, 10 years old, I am in the fourth grade and have been studying online for 2 months now. Online learning is not hard at all. I spend my free time riding my bicycle, and playing with my ball. I am lucky to have a yard, we don’t have to stay inside the house all the time. But, we don’t visit others and no one comes to visit us. That is why I am a bit bored. Also, I…, Nana Samkharadze, mother of Tekla and Lile Machavariani, Tekla and Lile are having a good a time as possible during the pandemic. We try to keep up with their education – they are 4 and 5 years old – and we are teaching their age-specific skills as much as we can. We learn letters, numbers, addition and subtraction, and most of the time we play. We come up with different things. The girls have even made…, Giorgi Kapchelashvili, 17 years old, Kutaisi, The recent changes have affected me very deeply. Staying at home for such a long time is bad for one’s health. Most of the time I am on the computer. I miss real life communication with others a lot. Before, I woke up at 8 a.m., now I wake up in the afternoon. I play on my phone while still in bed. Next, I have “breakfast” and again – telephone.…, Amiko Turabelidze, 12 years old, I love TV school programmes, and I watch them often. I personally like distance learning very much, because I have more free time. Now, I can spend more time riding my bike, drawing, and listening to music. I also help my grandfather in the vineyard. I communicate with friends on the Internet, but we cannot see one another and talk. I hope…, Nika Khelaia, 13 years old, Initially, I was afraid that online classes would be difficult, but it doesn’t seem as hard as I expected. In a way, it’s even easy. Currently, anatomy is the most interesting subject for me, because I am going to become a doctor, specifically, a surgeon. I usually take part in a lot of competitions, and I hope to be able to participate again…
07 April 2020

How to protect your family’s mental health in the face of coronavirus disease (COVID-19)

< Back to UNICEF COVID-19 portal Parents and children are facing major life disruptions with the outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). School closures, physical distancing, it’s a lot to take in and it’s difficult for everyone in the family. We sat down with expert adolescent psychologist, best-selling author, monthly  New York Times  …, Dr. Damour: Start by finding out what they are hearing or what they think is true. It’s not enough to just give your kid facts. If your child has picked up something that is inaccurate or picked up news that is not correct they will combine the new information you give them with the old information they have into a sort of Frankenstein…, Dr. Damour: Let them be sad and don’t try to guilt them out of it. Don’t say, “Other people have this worse than you.” Now your kid feels sad and guilty! That doesn’t make it better. Say to them, “You are having the right reaction. This really stinks. You’re not going to get to be with your friends. You’re not going to get to spend spring on…, Dr. Damour: In our house — I have two daughters — we’ve decided that we are going to have a dinner team every night. We’re going to create a schedule of who’s in charge of dinner and sometimes it’ll be me and my spouse and sometimes it’ll be me and one of my daughters. We’ll mix it up in pairs, and my older daughter is a teen and my younger…