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Evaluation database

Evaluation report

2016 Zimbabwe: Mid Term Evaluation of the Joint Programme on Prevention of Gender Based Violence (JPGBV) Against Young Women and Adolescent Girls



Author: Development Solutions Consultancy Firm and Reviewers were: UNICEF Zimbabwe Technical Research and Evaluation Group (TREG) and Child Protection Section

Executive summary

With the aim to continuously improve transparency and use of evaluation, UNICEF Evaluation Office manages the "Global Evaluation Reports Oversight System (GEROS)". Within this system, an external independent company reviews and rates all evaluation reports. The quality rating scale for evaluation reports is as follows: “Highly Satisfactory”, “Satisfactory”, “Fair” or “Unsatisfactory”. You will find the link to the quality rating below, labelled as ‘Part 2’ of the report, and the executive feedback summary labelled as 'Part 3'.

Background:

To complement government efforts in addressing GBV, UNICEF and UN Women designed a Joint Program on Prevention of Gender Based Violence (JPGBV) against adolescent girls (10-19 years) and young women (20-24 years). The programme is also implemented at the national level. UNICEF and UN Women are partnering with the Ministry of Women Affairs Gender and Community Development (MWAGCD), as the lead government agency to implement the programme. UNICEF is the designated administrative agent (responsible for financial reporting) under the pass through arrangement while coordination on a day to day is done jointly. To facilitate jointness in programme implementation, a steering committee was put in place to “coordinate, oversee and monitor the implementation” of the programme. Members of this structure were MWAGCD, the Danish Embassy and the two UN agencies.

The governmental partners are:  1) MWAGCD; (2) Ministry of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs (MoJLPA); (3) Ministry of Health and Child Care (MoHCC); (4) Ministry of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare (MoPSLSW); (5) Ministry of Home Affairs; and (6) the Judicial Service Commission (JSC). The non-governmental partners for the programme are: World Vision; Women’s Trust working in partnership with Tag a Life International; Students and Youths Working on Reproductive Health Action Team (SAYWHAT); Justice for Children Trust (JCT) in collaboration with Women and Law in Southern Africa (WLSA) and Zimbabwe Women Lawyers Association (ZWLA); Childline; and Family Support Trust (FST).

The specific outcomes of the programme are:

  • Outcome 1:  National normative and financial GBV framework strengthened
  • Outcome 2: Improved preventive measures for GBV
  • Outcome 3: Strengthened service delivery for survivors of GBV

Purpose/Objective:

Purpose of the evaluation
The purpose of the evaluation was to provide an early indication on the achievement of output level-results. It aimed at assessing progress against objectives contained in the log frame, to check if the programme was on track, and if any adjustments were needed, draw conclusions about the programme strategy and inform future programming. Furthermore, the evaluation of the JPGV was meant to provide useful lessons learnt that would inform implementation of the JPGBV and other similar programmes in the future.

The midterm evaluation was also to provide credible and useful information on the added value of Joint Programs in enhancing the achievement of results on gender equality, children’s’ rights and the empowerment of women through improved UN system coherence and efficiency by using joint designs and implementation process.

Methodology:

The evaluation was undertaken in a participatory manner with the Reference Group being the main instrument for facilitating engagement between the evaluation team, implementers and the donor in reviewing of outputs from the process. The evaluation also used a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods.

Key guiding principles of the evaluation were:

  • Human rights – The evaluation assessed if the key principles in human rights were integrated i.e. availability of services, access to services, awareness raising, participation and control.
  • Participatory and inclusivity –The evaluation used participatory methods for data collection (case studies, FGDs, KI interviews) and respondents include both beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries.
  • Gender equity/non-discrimination - The evaluation assessed if the key principles as in the Girls’ empowerment framework were integrated i.e. availability of services, access to services, awareness raising, participation and control.
  • Independence, objectivity and impartiality to ensure credibility and legitimacy to evidence based evaluation results – the evaluation team maintained independence of opinion supported by verified facts.

Findings and Conclusions:

Programme was relevant to the context and the programme design was appropriate for addressing GBV among adolescent girls and young women. The “upstream” and “downstream” focus allows for the programme to support behavior and attitude change while unlocking institutional bottlenecks that undermine efforts to eradicate GBV.

The programme implementation presents good economy as unit costs are reasonable.

Programme delivery rates were significantly lower than planned and undermined by significant delays in implementation activities due to the multi-stakeholder nature of some activities and delays in disbursement of funds to CSO partners.

Monitoring and evaluation: Although a joint Results Framework was developed by the UN Women and UNICEF, each agent monitored their own activities using existing tools and approaches in the agencies. This has undermined jointness in programme implementation and delivery of results.

Joint programming modality and gender equality and women’s empowerment results: Using the traction of UN Women in the gender sector and that of UNICEF in the child protection sector, the two UN agencies were more easily able to bring stakeholders together than would have been the case as individual agencies.

While the work on building systems and capacity has been evident in the programme, effectiveness and sustainability of these initiatives is undermined by several issues. First the government is resource constrained and may not be able to recruit, apply and sustain the capacity being advocated in the programme. It would be prudent to explore how; for example, the work on Clinical Guidelines on Managing Sexual Abuse can be incorporated in current health systems strengthening initiatives such as the Health Development Fund. Further training of nurses needs to overcome the reluctance of health staff to attend court cases which in turn makes them shun attending to survivors of GBV as they will be required to present evidence in court.

Recommendations:

  • Recommendation 1: UN agencies should consider incorporating livelihood support in a GBV programmes through forming stronger linkages between the GBV action and other programmes delivering livelihoods support to specifically target survivors of GBV as part of efforts to mainstream gender.
  • Recommendation 2: Future GBV programmes by UN agencies and government should consider supporting places of safety for  adolescent girls with children and adult women and their children. This can be through  harmonization of the SOPs for Shelters and the Children Act’s Safe Placement Procedures for Children.
  • Recommendation 3: Considering a large number of adolescents are found in school system, the GBV programme should address lack of systematic engagement with engaging with the Ministry of Education and create linkages with the existing Education sector work (such as EDF). and other programs
  • Recommendation 4: There should be a continued investment in strengthening of government capacity to address GBV using existing systems strengthening initiatives e.g. by utilizing existing opportunities such as the Health Development Fund which can take up roll out of the Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Sexual Abuse.
  • Recommendation 5: The programme had no baseline for indicators related to knowledge, attitudes and behavior change. There is need for a future programme to conduct a baseline survey at the onset in order to measure its achievements.
  • Recommendation 6:  While each individual UN agency monitored its components, this was insufficient in the context of joint programming. It undermined programme wide monitoring. The programme has to: have one M&E system – tools, guidelines and results framework; and incorporate systematic joint monitoring
  • Recommendation 7: It is recommended that in the remaining period of the programme, the participating UN agencies priorities documentation of results, lessons and best practices from the programme.


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Report information

Year:
2016

Country:
Zimbabwe

Region:
ESAR

Type:
Evaluation

Theme:
Gender based violence; sexual exploitation ; gender and justice

Partners:
Main government partners: (1) Ministry of Women Affairs, Gender and Community Development (MWAGCD); (2) Ministry of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs (MoJLPA); (3) Ministry of Health and Child Care (MoHCC); (4) Ministry of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare (MoPSLSW); (5) Ministry of Home Affairs; and (6) the Judicial Service Commission and the implementing CSO partners are: World Vision; Women’s Trust working in partnership with Tag a Life International; Students and Youths Working on Reproductive Health Action Team (SAYWHAT); Justice for Children Trust (JCT) in collaboration with Women and Law in Southern Africa (WLSA) and Zimbabwe Women Lawyers Association (ZWLA); Childline; and Family Support Trust (FST).

Language:
English

Sequence #:
2016/002

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