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Mozambique, 22 February 2016: Visiting families supported by the social support programs

A delegation from the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency and the Embassy of Sweden in Mozambique, accompanied the UN Joint Programme for Social Protection in Mozambique visited families supported by the social support programs, which are implemented by the National Institute of Social Action in Chokwé.

© UNICEF Mozambique/2016/Rita Neves
“We use this money to visit the hospital regularly and also to buy corn flour, cooking oil and soap. The subsidy helps a lot but we also need to rely on our neighbours to cover the monthly expenses,” said Neasse Mussuei.

 
CHOKWÉ, Gaza, Mozambique – On February 9, a delegation from the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency and the Embassy of Sweden in Mozambique, accompanied the United Nation Joint Programme for Social Protection in Mozambique visited families supported by the social support programs, which are implemented by the National Institute of Social Action in Chokwé.

The team, including Ms Luisa Cumba, National Director of National Institute of Social Action (INAS) and Ms Ana Dalila Tuzine, Delegate of INAS in Chokwe, visited 5º Bairro and met women who talked about their lives and the impact of the Social Protection programs. Elisa Ciumica, who has received the basic social subsidy since 1998, lives alone and receives 310 Meticais (US$6.80) a month to help her buy basic food such as oil, rice and flour. She said, “I no longer have the strength to fetch water so the neighbours bring it to me and I use some of the subsidy to pay for this.”

The delegation also spoke to Neasse Mussuei and her 10 year old orphaned granddaughter, who has learning difficulties. Neasse requires medical care for her lost eyesight and her granddaughter also needs medical care. As Neasse explained, “We use this money to visit the hospital regularly and also to buy corn flour, cooking oil and soap. The subsidy helps a lot but we also need to rely on our neighbours to cover the monthly expenses.”

Sarafina Chauque, who has received the basic social subsidy since 2010 supports her sister’s children since she died. Sarafina explained that she still has the strength to cultivate a small piece of land, however the subsidy is used to buy food and soap.

One of the women, Deolinda Ndendzane, lost her house in floods during 2013 and since then has lived in an emergency tent, with support from the basic subsidy. She is on a waiting list to receive support to move into a house. Deolinda uses the subsidy to by firewood, salt, flour and soap.

The team also met Salmina Muchanga, who lives with her two orphaned grandchildren. She said, “I received this piece of land and this new house thanks to the direct social support. I also receive support to help with the school uniforms and materials.”

The Swedish Government, through SIDA and the United Nations Joint Programme on Social Protection in Mozambique, has generously contributed towards the strengthening of systems at the level of the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Welfare (MGCAS) and INAS over the past five years.

The United Nations Joint Programme on Social Protection in Mozambique has been established in 2007 by UNICEF, ILO and WFP, with the aim of supporting government to protect the poorest and most marginalized households with quality advice and financial support resulting in a functioning national Social Protection Floor. The three organizations have been supporting the strengthening of the Social Protection System in Mozambique at policy level and systems level and through direct implementation.

 

 
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