To see and to be seen

How the world of media helped me find my professional calling

Ranko Magovčević
Ranko Magovčević is a 16-year-old student from Podgorica, Montenegro
UNICEF Montenegro / Dusko Miljanic / 2018

20 August 2019

About the author:

Ranko Magovčević is a 16-year-old student from Podgorica, Montenegro. Ranko plays the accordion, sings in the orchestra of the Association of the Blind of Montenegro and has won numerous awards in recital competitions throughout the country. He is a member of UNICEF Volunteers – Young Reporters.

 

Hello, my name is Ranko and I am here to share with you the things I love and care about. Although the first thing people notice about me is that I have low vision, that does not define who I am.

I believe we are defined by the things that we love. For me, these are my friends and family, playing the accordion, singing in the orchestra of the Association of the Blind of Montenegro, reading, and of course, receiving recognition for my work.

Everyone loves praise, but the applause I get when I am on stage is especially important to me – because it helps me ‘see’ the support of so many people at once.

 

Ranko playing the accordion.
UNICEF Montenegro / Dusko Miljanic / 2018
Ranko playing the accordion.

My greatest passion, though, is the radio. I have always dreamed of becoming a radio host.

This is why I was delighted when we were told at school about UNICEF’s workshops for young reporter volunteers. I immediately decided to apply for an audition.

Passing the audition was so thrilling, but that was only the beginning of my journey. Now, after almost eight months of involvement in the workshops, I can say that I have learned a lot about the media – all sorts of things I had not even considered before.

I’ve grown to know different formats and genres of journalism, how to distinguish ethical from non-ethical reporting and all about how to identify and critically analyse media content. This helped me realise how important it is for children and young people in Montenegro to develop media literacy.

Having had the chance to work in a radio studio through the UNICEF project, I realized that this is what I’d most like to do: To be a radio host.

Some may say that radio may not be the best route to promote media literacy, but I disagree. According to a survey conducted last year by UNICEF and the Agency for Electronic Media of Montenegro, within the media literacy campaign “Let’s Choose What We Watch”, every fifth child in Montenegro listens to the radio every day. I think radio is and continues to be such an empowering medium, because, it reaches the most vulnerable people.

Radio does not only empower through informing, but also through bringing laughter into people’s homes. That is why comedy radio shows are my favourite.

I hope one day to have the chance to be in a humorous radio drama.

But for now, I am enjoying the fact that I can share with my friends everything I learned at the media literacy workshops.

UNICEF Volunteers - young reporters with the UNICEF Montenegro National Goodwill Ambassador Antonije Pusic alias Rambo Amadeus at the launching of the media literacy campaign song
UNICEF Montenegro / Dusko Miljanic / 2018
UNICEF Volunteers - young reporters with the UNICEF Montenegro National Goodwill Ambassador Antonije Pusic alias Rambo Amadeus at the launching of the media literacy campaign song, "Let's choose what we watch, " in Podgorica in December 2018

Seek out opportunities that can help you develop skills in a field you love, can help you see and be seen.

If there is just one thing I could say about my experience so far, it is “Seek out opportunities that can help you develop skills in a field you love, can help you see and be seen.” Only by taking such an opportunity can we gain the courage to realise our dreams.