Did my grandfather and I attend the same school?

Instead of teaching us to remember the “dots”, shouldn’t school teach us how to connect them?

Miljan Vlahović
Miljan Vlahović, is a 17-year-old UNICEF volunteer from Podgorica, Montenegro.
Miljan Vlahović

12 August 2019
About the author

Miljan Vlahović, is a 17-year-old UNICEF volunteer from Podgorica, Montenegro.  He is interested in graphic design and makes very interesting and engaging design solutions on various topics. Miljan is a member of the first team of 'UNICEF Volunteers - Young Reporters' formed in 2018 within the media campaign 'Let's Choose What We Watch'

 

What is school for anyway? All that precious time we spend learning things we often forget in a couple of days. When my parents ask me what we did in school and I tell them “nothing”, I am not kidding them – I have probably already forgotten by then.

I am lucky to have had the opportunity to spend many years learning about Pythagoras’ theorem, cell structure or some famous battle, as they help me a lot in life. In reality, I can’t remember the last time I or my parents even mentioned them.

Instead of teaching us to remember the “dots”, shouldn’t school teach us how to connect them?

I have the impression that my grandfather used to go to the same classroom and learn the exact same things – the only difference is that he had to walk another 10 km to get to school.

In Montenegro, 9 per cent of children have access to the Internet. This means that we have good conditions to modernise our education system.

If we have been provided with new technology today, why don’t we use it and implement it in our education system, acquiring new knowledge in a much more entertaining way?

If I had learnt about Pythagoras’ theorem, cell structure or famous battles by making a video, music video, animation or blog about them, it would certainly have been more interesting, and perhaps I would still remember those lessons better today. Perhaps I would be able to connect the “dots” better?

Take, for example, Finland: the country with the best education system in the world. Fewer working hours, no homework, and children learning through cooperation, not competition.

I think my grandfather would have liked to attend such a school in Montenegro, just like I would.