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07/31/2019
Why family-friendly policies are critical to increasing breastfeeding rates worldwide - UNICEF
https://www.unicef.org/eca/press-releases/why-family-friendly-policies-are-critical-increasing-breastfeeding-rates-worldwide
NEW YORK, , 1 August 2019, –, From supporting healthy brain development in babies and young children, protecting infants against infection, decreasing the risk of obesity and disease, reducing healthcare costs, and protecting nursing mothers against ovarian cancer and breast cancer, the benefits of breastfeeding for children and mothers are wide spread. Yet, policies that…, Only 4 out of 10 babies are exclusively breastfed, : Only 41 per cent of babies were exclusively breastfed in the first six months of life in 2018, as recommended. In comparison, these rates were more than half – 50.8 per cent – in the least developed countries. The highest rates were found in Rwanda (86.9 per cent), Burundi (82.3 per cent), Sri Lanka (82 percent), Solomon Islands (76.2 percent)…, Upper-middle-income countries have the lowest breastfeeding rates, : In upper-middle-income countries, exclusive breastfeeding rates were the lowest at 23.9 per cent, having decreased from 28.7 per cent in 2012., Breastfeeding at work works, : Regular lactation breaks during working hours to accommodate breastfeeding or the expression of breastmilk, and a supportive breastfeeding environment including adequate facilities enable mothers to continue exclusive breastfeeding for six months, followed by age-appropriate complementary breastfeeding., Working women do not get enough support to continue breastfeeding, : Worldwide, only 40 per cent of women with newborns have even the most basic maternity benefits at their workplace. This disparity widens among countries in Africa, where only 15 per cent of women with newborns have any benefits at all to support the continuation of breastfeeding., Too few countries provide paid parental leave, : The International Labour Organization (ILO) Maternity Protection Convention 2000 (no. 183) standards include at least 14 weeks of paid maternity leave, and countries are recommended to provide at least 18 weeks as well as workplace support for breastfeeding families. Yet, only 12 per cent of countries worldwide provide adequate paid maternity…, Availability of longer maternity leave means higher chances of breastfeeding, : A recent study found that women with six months or more maternity leave were at least 30 per cent more likely to maintain any breastfeeding for at least the first six months., Breastfeeding makes sense for both babies and their mothers, : Increasing breastfeeding could prevent 823,000 annual deaths in children under five and 20,000 annual deaths from breast cancer., Not enough babies breastfed in the first hour, : In 2018, less than half of babies worldwide – 43 per cent – were breastfed within the first hour of life. Immediate skin-to skin contact and starting breastfeeding early keeps a baby warm, builds his or her immune system, promotes bonding, boosts a mother’s milk supply and increases the chances that she will be able to continue…, The investment case for breastfeeding, : If optimal breastfeeding is achieved, there would be an estimated reduction in global healthcare costs of USD 300 billion. ###, Notes to Editors:, About World Breastfeeding Week, World Breastfeeding Week is marked annually from 1 to 7 August to highlight the critical importance of breastfeeding for children across the globe. Breastfeeding gives children the healthiest start in life and is one of the simplest, smartest and most cost-effective ways we have of ensuring that all children survive and thrive. This fact sheet –…
05/13/2021
Support for frontline workers: Implementation of health policies for refugee and migrant children
https://www.unicef.org/eca/stories/support-frontline-workers-implementation-health-policies-refugee-and-migrant-children
“I find the tool for identification of unaccompanied and separated girls [UASGs] very useful since the indicators included are clear and help us recognise UASGs more quickly.”   A frontline worker in Serbia welcomes a new tool to identify refugee and migrant girls Two girls are talking to each other. The ‘RM Child-Health’ initiative has supported…, In Bosnia and Herzegovina, , for example, 34 national service providers and other frontline workers have completed pre- and in-service training on health issues for refugee and migrant children and international best practice. Country-specific policy packages for health policy implementation have been made available on standard operating procedures (SOPs) for paediatric…, In Bulgaria, , the past year has seen a strong focus on the training of frontline workers to identify, manage and refer children with physical and mental health problems, and on embedding child protection standards into health provision. In all, 36 frontline workers have been trained to work effectively with children who have mental health issues – far…, In Italy, , UNICEF has worked with MdM, reception sites, local health authorities and others to enhance the knowledge and skills of frontline workers from different sectors – health, child protection, education and reception services – on health risks for migrant and refugee children, with a focus on mental health and GBV prevention and response. Training…, In Serbia, , UNICEF and the University of Belgrade (Faculty of Political Sciences) have developed and piloted the interdisciplinary university Course Protection of Children Affected by Mixed Migration over the past year. The course has reached 40 students of social work and active frontline workers to date – well on track to reach the 50 planned for the…, Looking ahead, In Bulgaria, , UNICEF will continue to work with the Animus Association Foundation to develop a structured GBV training curriculum for frontline workers, aiming for eventual scale-up. In addition, the CRWB will complete its analysis of the health needs of refugees and migrants in Bulgaria and their access to state-led health services in comparison to their…, In Greece, , UNICEF plans targeted training for health authorities, service providers and other frontline workers on health issues and international best practices for refugee and migrant children. Professionals from the National Health Organization (EODY) working in open accommodation sites will gain insights into how to manage and refer medical cases among…, In Italy, , operational guidance on providing psychosocial support to unaccompanied migrant and refugee children, produced in collaboration with MdM, is being finalized for use by frontline workers. UNICEF is also mapping mental health and psychosocial services in Rome, Reggio Calabria and Syracuse to identify those that are accessible to migrants and…, In Serbia, , UNICEF and the Institute of Mental Health have launched cutting-edge field research in response to concerns about the health status of people living in migrant centres, particularly in relation to the use – and abuse – of alcohol and drugs. A final report is expected at the end of 2021 and will guide the development of materials and capacity…