08/31/2021
Students in Armenia explore a healthy lifestyle with Healthy Buddy
https://www.unicef.org/eca/stories/students-armenia-explore-healthy-lifestyle-healthy-buddy
It’s 11 o'clock on a hot summer Sunday morning, but Achajur village school in Tavush marz is full of students. Over 120 children have come to school to take part in UNICEF’s  “Healthy Buddy” session , organized in partnership with the Ministry of Health and Family Academy NGO. Healthy Buddy is a special session about health nutrition and lifestyle designed for each age group that helps children of different ages to understand the importance of proper nutrition for their life and development and to become Healthy Buddy advocates themselves. Vahe, 7, is a new Healthy Buddy advocate, who walked for exactly 40 minutes from home to school today to take part in the session. “I have heard of words like ‘carbohydrates’ or ‘protein’ a lot, but I didn’t know that our immune cells are made up of protein, and carbohydrates are like fuel for people․ They give us energy to move and do other things. I also did not know that sugar is a carbohydrate, but it is a bad fuel.” Boy is listening to the Healthy Buddy session. UNICEF Armenia/2021/Margaryan Vahe prides himself of the little garden that he has at home, full of fruit trees - a big mulberry tree, a pomegranate tree, apple trees. He promised to take care of them and make sure to get his daily intake of fruit during the day. This extraordinarily smart, extremely active and quite mature 7-year-old is very caring for his family members, admires his brother, and dreams of creating a safe and positive environment in his community. “I want to become a lawyer and defend my community from criminals, so that we can all live in a better world.” Vahe glues the HEalthy plate magnet to their refrigerator. Vahe already knows that his health and success in the future depend on him eating healthy every day. Meanwhile, thousands of children in Armenia go through what experts call the triple burden of malnutrition. First, insufficient food intake threatens the survival, growth and development of children. Then there is micronutrient deficiency - a hidden form of malnutrition - in which case children do not get enough vitamins and micronutrients, necessary for a normal immune response, bone growth and brain development. On the other hand, there is also the issue of overweight or obesity due to excess calories and sedentary lifestyle. UNICEF, the Ministry of Health and other partners work to prevent this. “We want to create an environment where all children and young people enjoy their right to a healthy diet. Where children and their parents know exactly what is needed for healthy development and know that it is linked to children’s academic wellbeing at school and in the future. You need to eat healthy not only to have a healthy body, but also to have a healthy mind,”  explains Liana Hovakimyan, UNICEF Health Specialist and shares facts. Liana Hovakimyan, Health Specialist at UNICEF Armenia UNICEF Armenia/2021/Galstyan “In the first two years of life, 75% of each spoon is spent on building the child’s brain. As the child grows, his or her nutritional needs also grow. We all must act urgently to have a healthier generation and society.” At the Achajur school session, we met with three girlfriends - all three honors students, full of dreams, and super excited for the session to start. Three girlfriends - all three honors students, full of dreams, and super excited for the session to start. The girls were most surprised when nutritionist Lidia Ayvazyan listed the ingredients of carbonated drinks, chips, cookies and ice cream, while presenting the repercussions of consuming junk food. “Actually, I used to eat both healthy and junk food, but now I’ve made up my mind. I will definitely eat healthier and do my best to put together a ‘healthy plate’ with the help of veggies and fruits. I will put this ‘healthy plate’ sticker on our fridge, and it will always remind me of the secret to proper nutrition,” shared Anahit, 10, after the session. Nutritionist asks questions to the girl who participates in sessions, UNICEF Armenia/2021/Margaryan Anahit’s friend Narine added that they have already learned about proteins, carbohydrates and fats during their “Me and the environment” course at school. “But I didn’t know that healthy eating is also linked to learning well at school. I love school very much, so I have to eat well in order to study well.” Boy and a girl ate laying chess. Narine, who loves chess and dancing, dreams of becoming a writer. She has already authored her first four fairy tales, one of which is entitled The Chess Queen, where a little boy plays chess with the Queen and mates her in one move. And just like the little boy in Narine’s fairy tale, ever child has the potential to “check” and “mate” to reach their full potential. But first, they must be equipped with the necessary knowledge and opportunities to achieve their dreams. After Achajur, Healthy Buddy team is on the road again, set to reach to over 4200 girls and boys in Shirak, Kotayk, Aragatsotn, Lori, Tavush and Yerevan.
10/22/2019
Addressing double burden of malnutrition must be prioritized in Eastern Europe and Central Asia – UNICEF
https://www.unicef.org/eca/press-releases/addressing-double-burden-malnutrition-must-be-prioritized-eastern-europe-and-central
– The new State of the World’s Children Report: Children, Food and Nutrition was launched at a special event in Kazakhstan to promote  nutrition and raise awareness about unhealthy diets among children in Central Asia. The event included more than one thousand child participants and was organized by the Foundation of the First President of Kazakhstan.  The new report shows that at least 1 in 3 children under five globally – or over 200 million – is either undernourished or overweight. Almost 2 in 3 children between six months and two years of age are not fed food that supports their rapidly growing bodies and brains. This puts them at risk of poor brain development, weak learning, low immunity, increased infections and, in many cases, death. In Eastern Europe and Central Asia, 18 per cent of the poorest children under 5 years old are stunted, which means they have low height for their age. While at the same time, 15 per cent of children under five years old in the Region are overweight, which is the highest rate globally. “In Central Asia and Eastern Europe children face a double burden of malnutrition – undernutrition found alongside obesity,” said Amirhossein Yarparvar, Health & Nutrition Specialist for UNICEF’s Regional Office for Europe and Central Asia. “Ensuring all children have adequate nutrition must be an urgent priority for policy makers, communities and families.” The report found that the Region has made gains in exclusive breastfeeding, with the percentage of infants breastfed rising from 20 per cent in 2005 to 33 per cent in 2018. But even with this increase, 65 percent of newborns are deprived of the recommended 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding. The report lists several recommendations to improve child nutrition, including: • National food systems must put children’s nutrition at the heart of their work because their nutritional needs are unique and meeting them is critical for sustainable development. • Financial incentives should be used to reward actors who increase the availability of healthy and affordable foods in markets and other points of sale especially in low-income communities. • Financial disincentives on unhealthy foods can improve children’s diets. For example, taxes on sugary foods and beverages can reduce their consumption by children and adolescents. • Fortification of complementary foods and staple foods with micronutrients can be a cost-effective intervention to combat hidden hunger in children, young people and women.  family eating at home in a low-income neighbourhood_Alimzhan Jorobayev Bektur Zhanibekov A family of seven people eats at home in a low-income neighbourhood in rural Kyrgyzstan on 18 March 2012.
10/08/2019
Poor diets damaging children’s health worldwide, warns UNICEF
https://www.unicef.org/eca/press-releases/poor-diets-damaging-childrens-health-worldwide-warns-unicef
– An alarmingly high number of children are suffering the consequences of poor diets and a food system that is failing them, UNICEF warned today in a new report on children, food and nutrition. The State of the World’s Children 2019: Children, food and nutrition finds that at least 1 in 3 children under five – or over 200 million – is either undernourished or overweight. Almost 2 in 3 children between six months and two years of age are not fed food that supports their rapidly growing bodies and brains. This puts them at risk of poor brain development, weak learning, low immunity, increased infections and, in many cases, death. “Despite all the technological, cultural and social advances of the last few decades, we have lost sight of this most basic fact: If children eat poorly, they live poorly,” said Henrietta Fore, UNICEF Executive Director. “Millions of children subsist on an unhealthy diet because they simply do not have a better choice. The way we understand and respond to malnutrition needs to change: It is not just about getting children enough to eat; it is above all about getting them the right food to eat. That is our common challenge today.” The report provides the most comprehensive assessment yet of 21 st century child malnutrition in all its forms. It describes a triple burden of malnutrition: Undernutrition, hidden hunger caused by a lack of essential nutrients, and overweight among children under the age of five, noting that around the world: 149 million children are stunted, or too short for their age, 50 million children are wasted, or too thin for their height, 340 million children – or 1 in 2 – suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and nutrients such as vitamin A and iron, 40 million children are overweight or obese. The report warns that poor eating and feeding practices start from the earliest days of a child’s life. Though breastfeeding can save lives, for example, only 42 per cent of children under six months of age are exclusively breastfed and an increasing number of children are fed infant formula. Sales of milk-based formula grew by 72 per cent between 2008 and 2013 in upper middle-income countries such as Brazil, China and Turkey, largely due to inappropriate marketing and weak policies and programmes to protect, promote and support breastfeeding. As children begin transitioning to soft or solid foods around the six-month mark, too many are introduced to the wrong kind of diet, according to the report. Worldwide, close to 45 per cent of children between six months and two years of age are not fed any fruits or vegetables. Nearly 60 per cent do not eat any eggs, dairy, fish or meat. As children grow older, their exposure to unhealthy food becomes alarming, driven largely by inappropriate marketing and advertising, the abundance of ultra-processed foods in cities but also in remote areas, and increasing access to fast food and highly sweetened beverages. For example, the report shows that 42 per cent of school-going adolescents in low- and middle-income countries consume carbonated sugary soft drinks at least once a day and 46 per cent eat fast food at least once a week. Those rates go up to 62 per cent and 49 per cent, respectively, for adolescents in high-income countries. As a result, overweight and obesity levels in childhood and adolescence are increasing worldwide. From 2000 to 2016, the proportion of overweight children between 5 and 19 years of age doubled from 1 in 10 to almost 1 in 5. Ten times more girls and 12 times more boys in this age group suffer from obesity today than in 1975. The greatest burden of malnutrition in all its forms is shouldered by children and adolescents from the poorest and most marginalized communities, the report notes. Only 1 in 5 children aged six months to two years from the poorest households eats a sufficiently diverse diet for healthy growth. Even in high-income countries such as the UK, the prevalence of overweight is more than twice as high in the poorest areas as in the richest areas. The report also notes that climate-related disasters cause severe food crises. Drought, for example, is responsible for 80 per cent of damage and losses in agriculture, dramatically altering what food is available to children and families, as well as the quality and price of that food. To address this growing malnutrition crisis in all its forms, UNICEF is issuing an urgent appeal to governments, the private sector, donors, parents, families and businesses to help children grow healthy by: Empowering families, children and young people to demand nutritious food, including by improving nutrition education and using proven legislation – such as sugar taxes – to reduce demand for unhealthy foods. Driving food suppliers to do the right thing for children, by incentivizing the provision of healthy, convenient and affordable foods.  Building healthy food environments for children and adolescents by using proven approaches, such as accurate and easy-to-understand labelling and stronger controls on the marketing of unhealthy foods. Mobilizing supportive systems – health, water and sanitation, education and social protection – to scale up nutrition results for all children. Collecting, analyzing and using good-quality data and evidence to guide action and track progress. “We are losing ground in the fight for healthy diets,” said Fore. “This is not a battle we can win on our own. We need governments, the private sector and civil society to prioritize child nutrition and work together to address the causes of unhealthy eating in all its forms.” Children eating UNICEF/UN0339621/Darkhan Zhagiparov
01/29/2021
Strengthening national health capacity for refugee and migrant children
https://www.unicef.org/eca/stories/strengthening-national-health-capacity-refugee-and-migrant-children
At first glance, helping a 10-year girl from Iran, now living in Bosnia and Herzegovina, get a new pair of glasses might seem a simple thing. For Maisa, however, this is the end result of a continuum of intensive support, from identifying a girl who struggles with an eye condition, to connecting her to a skilled ophthalmologist. And now Maisa stands in front of a mirror, trying on the glasses that will enhance her life, learning and play. Such a momentous day is only possible when an established health system is equipped to accommodate and respond to the complex needs of refugee and migrant children. Support from the ‘RM Child-Health’ initiative aims to reinforce and enhance health systems across five European countries (Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Greece, Italy and Serbia) so that these systems can deliver the high-quality services that are the right of every child – and that every child needs, regardless of their origins. The aim: to ensure that health systems catch every refugee and migrant child who is in danger of slipping through the gaps. And there are additional benefits: a health system that works for these vulnerable and excluded children is a health system that works for every child, and that can reach those who are so often the very hardest to reach. This 24-month, €4.3 million initiative, which was launched in January 2020 by the European Union Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety, aims to strengthen the capacity of health systems to deliver health care to refugee and migrant children. That means ensuring access to life-saving immunization, to mental health and psycho-social support, and services to prevent and respond to gender-based violence, as well as maternal and new-born health care and nutrition. Stronger health systems are needed to overcome the bottlenecks that confront so many refugee and migrant families when they try to access health care. “ The profound challenges that often confront populations – especially children – on the move can include cultural and language barriers, stigma and discrimination on the part of health providers, and a lack of detailed medical records or paperwork,” says Dr. Basil Rodriques, UNICEF Regional Health Advisor. “They may also have their own reasons to distrust state-provided services, including fears of deportation.”