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02/26/2021
UNICEF handed over 223 refrigerated vehicles to the Government of Uzbekistan
https://www.unicef.org/eca/unicef-handed-over-223-refrigerated-vehicles-government-uzbekistan
Today, UNICEF handed over 223 refrigerated vehicles to the Government of Uzbekistan. The vehicles support the Government’s efforts to strengthen the country’s immunization cold chain and will ensure vaccines are kept at optimal cold temperatures needed to retain their effectiveness when are delivered to regional and district health centres across the country. Uzbekistan’s Deputy Prime Minister, Mr. Behzod Musaevm, accompanied by the Minister of Health, Dr. Abdukhakim Khadjibaev, presided over the handover ceremony was, noted that the consignment of vehicles was timely. Earlier, the Government of Uzbekistan had announced the first shipment of AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines, was due to arrive in coming days. UNICEF Representative, Mr. Munir Mammadzade said, “The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated UNICEF’s push for to make vaccines available to all within the framework of the Health System Strengthening Programme.” The vehicles are valued at more than USD 2 million and was supported by the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI). Over the last 3 years UNICEF and partners have invested nearly USD 20 million to support the Ministry of Health to strengthen the country’s national immunization programme. UNICEF supported the construction of vaccine warehouses at national, regional and district levels, helped procure and install cold rooms, freezers and refrigerators, and vehicles to transport of vaccine. As well, UNICEF supported the Ministry of Health in the development of Uzbekistan’s vaccine logistic management information system. The current efforts are historically significant and will improve the national immunization system and in the context of COVID-19 vaccination roll-out, and well beyond. COVAX is co-led by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), working in partnership with UNICEF as well as the World Bank, civil society organisations, manufacturers, and others.
10/02/2017
Roma children
https://www.unicef.org/eca/what-we-do/ending-child-poverty/roma-children
The Roma are one of Europe’s largest and most disadvantaged minority groups. Of the 10 to 12 million Roma people in Europe, around two-thirds live in central and eastern European countries. While some have escaped from poverty, millions live in slums and lack the basic services they need, from healthcare and education to electricity and clean water.  Discrimination against Roma communities is commonplace, fuelling their exclusion. Far from spurring support for their social inclusion, their poverty and poor living conditions often reinforce the stereotyped views of policymakers and the public. And far from receiving the support that is their right, Roma children face discrimination that denies them the essentials for a safe, healthy and educated childhood.   Discrimination against Roma children can start early, and have a life-long impact. The problems facing Roma children can start early in life. In Bosnia and Herzegovina, for example, Roma infants are four times more likely than others to be born underweight. They are also less likely to be registered at birth, and many lack the birth certificate that signals their right to a whole range of services.   As they grow, Roma children are more likely to be underweight than non-Roma children and less likely to be fully immunized. Few participate in early childhood education. They are less likely than non-Roma children to start or complete primary school, and Roma girls, in particular, are far less likely to attend secondary school. Only 19 per cent of Roma children make it this far in Serbia, compared to 89 per cent of non-Roma children.  There are also disparities in literacy rates across 10 countries in the region, with rates of 80 per cent for Roma boys and just under 75 per cent for Roma girls, compared to near universal literacy rates at national level.    Roma children are too often segregated into ‘remedial’ classes within regular schools, and are more likely to be in ‘special’ schools – a reflection of schools that are failing to meet their needs, rather than any failure on their part.   In Roma communities, child marriage may be perceived as a ‘valid’ way to protect young girls, and as a valued tradition. In reality, such marriages deepen the disparities experienced by girls, and narrow their opportunities in life.  In many Balkan countries, half of all Roma women aged 20-24 were married before the age of 18, compared to around 10 per cent nationally. Child marriage and school drop-out are closely linked, particularly for girls, and such marriages also expose girls to the dangers of early pregnancy and childbirth, as well as a high risk of domestic violence.