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05/13/2021
Empowering refugee and migrant children to claim their right to health: Improving health literacy
https://www.unicef.org/eca/stories/empowering-refugee-and-migrant-children-claim-their-right-health-improving-health-literacy
“I have always had to behave ‘like a girl’ and I am not used to being asked for my opinion, but you ask me to say what I think during these workshops.”   A 13-year-old girl from Syria describes the impact of empowerment workshops in Serbia  Boy is drawing a picture. UNICEF-supported activities for children on the island of Lesvos, Greece The ‘RM…, In Bosnia and Herzegovina, , information workshops have been tailored to the needs of different groups of children, including those who are unaccompanied and separated. Topics over the past year have included personal and oral hygiene, drug and alcohol use and its impact on health, the importance of immunization, early childhood development, medical…, In Bulgaria, , the initiative has supported group sessions that have exceeded their targets, with 99 sessions held for refugee children and mothers – more than three times the 28 sessions envisaged. There were more than twice as many information sessions on gender-based violence as originally planned: 107 rather than 48. In all, 600 refugee and migrant…, In Greece, , support from the initiative has enabled UNICEF and its partners to equip refugee and migrant children with information on health risks, entitlements and services through its non-formal education programme in urban areas and on the islands. In the first full year of the initiative, 1,796 children and 464 parents have received crucial information…, In Italy, , there has been an emphasis on peer-to-peer health literacy over the past year. Young refugees and migrants have shared critical health messages through, for example, the U-Report on the Move platform – a user-friendly, cost-effective and anonymous digital platform with more than 6,000 subscribers, where they speak out on the issues that matter…, Serbia, have also been exceeded, with 1,094 refugee and migrant children and parents receiving information on mental health (original target: 500) and 722 receiving information on GBV (original target: 600). Looking beyond the sheer numbers of beneficiaries, those taking part in health literacy workshops, in particular, have voiced their appreciation. One…
07/02/2020
‘RM Child-Health’: safeguarding the health of refugee and migrant children in Europe
https://www.unicef.org/eca/rm-child-health-safeguarding-health-refugee-and-migrant-children-europe
The health risks faced by refugee and migrant children, More than 1.3 million children have made their way to Europe since 2014, fleeing conflict, persecution and poverty in their own countries. They include at least 225,000 children travelling alone – most of them teenage boys – as well as 500,000 children under the age of five. In 2019 alone, almost 32,000 children (8,000 of them unaccompanied or…, Rising to the challenge: the ‘RM Child-Health’ initiative, EU health In response to this challenge, the European Union Directorate General for Health and Food Safety is working with UNICEF to help ensure that refugee and migrant children and their families have access to quality health care and essential  health information in six countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Greece, Italy, Serbia and…, Strengthen the capacity of national authorities, to deliver health care to refugee and migrant children, including immunizations, mental health and psychosocial support, gender-based violence prevention and response, as well as maternal and newborn health care and nutrition counselling., Increase health literacy among refugee and migrant children, by providing information to safeguard their own health and help them make right decisions about their health and wellbeing, and medical interpreters and cultural mediators to support communication between children and families and health care providers., Strengthen the implementation of health policies, by, for example, increasing the number of health workers with the skills and knowledge to support refugee and migrant children who need health care. “This collaboration between the EU and UNICEF will ensure better access for the most vulnerable refugee and migrant children to vital health care, and to the support they need for their emotional, as…, Voices from the field, Newsletters, RM Newsletter January 2021 UNICEF ECARO RM Newsletter June 2021 UNICEF ECARO The content of this webpage represents the views of the author(s) only and is his/her sole responsibility; it cannot be considered to reflect the views of the European Commission and/or the Consumers, Health, Agriculture and Food Executive Agency or any other body of the…
05/13/2021
Safeguarding the health of refugee and migrant children during COVID-19
https://www.unicef.org/eca/stories/safeguarding-health-refugee-and-migrant-children-during-covid-19
"When COVID arrived here, I thought: ‘It's over, it will spread throughout the building’. I didn't think it was possible to avoid the spread of the outbreak. Instead, we have had very few cases and we owe this, above all, to the support we received from INTERSOS and UNICEF."  Josehaly (Josy), a refugee living in Rome A field worker from Intersos…, In Bulgaria, , UNICEF and its partners were able to take immediate measures with support from the ‘RM Child-Health’ initiative to alleviate the impact, including online awareness raising and information sessions and the use of different channels for communication, including social media. UNICEF’s partners, the Council of Refugee Women in Bulgaria (CRWB) and…, In Greece, , the initiative supported the development of child-friendly information posters and stickers for refugee and migrant children and their families on critical preventive measures and on what to do and where to go if they experience any COVID-19 symptoms., In Italy, , the initiative has supported outreach teams and community mobilization, providing refugee and migrant families with the information and resources they need to keep the pandemic at bay. In Rome, for example, health promoters from Intersos continued to work directly with refugee and migrant communities in informal settlements, not only to prevent…, In Serbia, , the initiative has supported UNICEF’s efforts to improve the immunization process for refugee children and migrants by strengthening the assessment and monitoring process. As a result of such efforts, refugees and migrants have been included in the national COVID-19 Immunization Plan.  , Building on what works, As these examples show, support from the ‘RM Child-Health initiative’ has helped UNICEF and its partners rise to the challenges posed by the pandemic over the past year. The initiative has enabled frontline workers to accelerate, adapt, expand and intensify work that was already underway, and to mobilize social media and other channels, as well as…
07/31/2019
Why family-friendly policies are critical to increasing breastfeeding rates worldwide - UNICEF
https://www.unicef.org/eca/press-releases/why-family-friendly-policies-are-critical-increasing-breastfeeding-rates-worldwide
NEW YORK, , 1 August 2019, –, From supporting healthy brain development in babies and young children, protecting infants against infection, decreasing the risk of obesity and disease, reducing healthcare costs, and protecting nursing mothers against ovarian cancer and breast cancer, the benefits of breastfeeding for children and mothers are wide spread. Yet, policies that…, Only 4 out of 10 babies are exclusively breastfed, : Only 41 per cent of babies were exclusively breastfed in the first six months of life in 2018, as recommended. In comparison, these rates were more than half – 50.8 per cent – in the least developed countries. The highest rates were found in Rwanda (86.9 per cent), Burundi (82.3 per cent), Sri Lanka (82 percent), Solomon Islands (76.2 percent)…, Upper-middle-income countries have the lowest breastfeeding rates, : In upper-middle-income countries, exclusive breastfeeding rates were the lowest at 23.9 per cent, having decreased from 28.7 per cent in 2012., Breastfeeding at work works, : Regular lactation breaks during working hours to accommodate breastfeeding or the expression of breastmilk, and a supportive breastfeeding environment including adequate facilities enable mothers to continue exclusive breastfeeding for six months, followed by age-appropriate complementary breastfeeding., Working women do not get enough support to continue breastfeeding, : Worldwide, only 40 per cent of women with newborns have even the most basic maternity benefits at their workplace. This disparity widens among countries in Africa, where only 15 per cent of women with newborns have any benefits at all to support the continuation of breastfeeding., Too few countries provide paid parental leave, : The International Labour Organization (ILO) Maternity Protection Convention 2000 (no. 183) standards include at least 14 weeks of paid maternity leave, and countries are recommended to provide at least 18 weeks as well as workplace support for breastfeeding families. Yet, only 12 per cent of countries worldwide provide adequate paid maternity…, Availability of longer maternity leave means higher chances of breastfeeding, : A recent study found that women with six months or more maternity leave were at least 30 per cent more likely to maintain any breastfeeding for at least the first six months., Breastfeeding makes sense for both babies and their mothers, : Increasing breastfeeding could prevent 823,000 annual deaths in children under five and 20,000 annual deaths from breast cancer., Not enough babies breastfed in the first hour, : In 2018, less than half of babies worldwide – 43 per cent – were breastfed within the first hour of life. Immediate skin-to skin contact and starting breastfeeding early keeps a baby warm, builds his or her immune system, promotes bonding, boosts a mother’s milk supply and increases the chances that she will be able to continue…, The investment case for breastfeeding, : If optimal breastfeeding is achieved, there would be an estimated reduction in global healthcare costs of USD 300 billion. ###, Notes to Editors:, About World Breastfeeding Week, World Breastfeeding Week is marked annually from 1 to 7 August to highlight the critical importance of breastfeeding for children across the globe. Breastfeeding gives children the healthiest start in life and is one of the simplest, smartest and most cost-effective ways we have of ensuring that all children survive and thrive. This fact sheet –…
02/01/2021
Strengthening the implementation of health policies
https://www.unicef.org/eca/stories/strengthening-implementation-health-policies
The ‘RM Child-Health’ initiative supports work across five European countries to build the capacity of those working directly with refugee and migrant children and adolescents, equipping them to work effectively with youngsters whose health needs are often complex., Even the best health policy is only as good as its implementation. The success of a policy written down on paper depends entirely on the ability of real-live people on the ground to turn it into tangible action. When it comes to refugee and migrant children in Europe, those who work directly with them will often determine whether or not a policy…, Helping frontline workers help refugee and migrant children, The ‘RM Child-health’ initiative aims to ease the pressure on frontline workers by enhancing their communication with children and by strengthening health systems through, for example, effective referral mechanisms. Better communication between children and health services is supported by training and mobilizing linguistic and cultural mediators…, Looking beyond health care, The initiative also promotes and supports multi-disciplinary approaches and teams to address the complex causes of health problems among refugee and migrant children – from trauma, anxiety and over-crowded conditions, to lack of hygiene facilities and immunization. As a result, support from the ‘RM Child-health’ initiative builds…
10/18/2017
Refugee and migrant children in Europe
https://www.unicef.org/eca/refugee-and-migrant-children
The challenge, Refugee and migrant children – some travelling with their families, some alone – risk everything, even their own lives, in search of a better life. Millions of uprooted families flee their homes to escape conflict, persecution and poverty in countries including Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia and Sudan.  When children and young people feel that…, Resources, These resources on emergencies represent just a small selection of materials produced by UNICEF and its partners in the region. The list is regularly updated to include the latest information.  Refugee and Migrant Children in Europe in 2019 - Accompanied, Unaccompanied and Separated (2020) - UNHCR, UNICEF & IOM The Palermo Model of Volunteer…, The solution, A roadmap for care and protection, UNICEF has worked with its partners to develop a Roadmap that provides guidelines to improve the care and protection of refugee and migrant children, whether they are travelling alone or with their parents or caregivers.  The Roadmap highlights the need to identify children, register them through child-friendly procedures, and build a relationship…, Tackling the root causes, People have always migrated to flee from trouble or to find better opportunities. Today, more people are on the move than ever, trying to escape from climate change, poverty and conflict, and aided as never before by digital technologies. Children make up one-third of the world’s population, but almost half of the world’s refugees: nearly 50…