04/20/2020
ВОЗ и ЮНИСЕФ: Продолжение оказания услуг по плановой иммунизации имеет жизненно важное значение во время пандемии COVID-19
https://www.unicef.org/eca/ru/Пресс-релизы/воз-и-юнисеф-продолжение-оказания-услуг-по-плановой-иммунизации-имеет-жизненно-важное
избежать дальнейшего воздействия COVID-19 на наши системы здравоохранения, обеспечив продолжение вакцинации людей всех возрастов в соответствии с национальными графиками. Я призываю страны даже в это трудное время продолжать оказание услуг по иммунизации и стимулировать спрос на вакцинацию на протяжении всей жизни человека. Обеспечение приоритетности иммунизации является одной из моих четырех основных областей моей работы и занимает центральное место в концепции ВОЗ в отношении здоровья в новой Европейской программе работы», – заявил д-р Ханс Генри П. Клюге, директор Европейского регионального бюро ВОЗ. ВОЗ и ЮНИСЕФ будут и впредь поддерживать усилия правительств по укреплению их программ иммунизации, в том числе посредством стратегического планирования для оказания услуг по иммунизации на справедливой основе, усиления эпиднадзора за болезнями, предупреждаемыми с помощью вакцин, а также обеспечения участия и просвещения местных сообществ. В новом будущем, в которое мы сейчас вступаем, вакцины будут по-прежнему служить основой для обеспечения здоровья и благополучия для всех. Именно благодаря солидарности, совместным действиям и неустанной приверженности принципу «не оставить никого без внимания» мы сможем вместе создать более здоровое будущее.   #ВакциныРаботают Georgia immunization UNICEF/UN0326765/Georgia
04/17/2020
Maintaining routine immunization services vital during the COVID-19 pandemic – WHO and UNICEF
https://www.unicef.org/eca/node/5936
The COVID-19 pandemic is a stark reminder that infectious diseases know no borders. All countries are vulnerable, regardless of income levels or the strength of their health care systems. Across the European Region, where tens of millions of people have been living in lockdown for weeks, and over 100,000 people have died, the speed and devastation of the novel coronavirus has completely upended lives. The urgent need for a COVID-19 vaccine underscores the pivotal role immunizations play in protecting lives and economies. As scientists around the world work to develop a vaccine against the novel coronavirus and health care capacities are stretched in responding to COVID-19, national routine immunization programmes are more critical than ever before. Governments across the Region must use every opportunity possible to protect people from the many diseases for which vaccines are already available. When routine vaccinations are missed, the risk of disease outbreaks increases. In 2018, approximately 527 000 children missed their first-dose of measles-containing vaccine in the WHO European Region. One year later in 2019, the measles virus exposed immunity gaps in Europe, infecting over 100 000 people, across all age-groups. Protecting children, adolescents and adults from vaccine-preventable diseases through vaccination is a must for the sustainability of health care systems. “We know that vulnerability to infectious diseases anywhere is a threat to public health everywhere,” said Ms. Afshan Khan, UNICEF Regional Director for Europe and Central Asia. “It is critical that routine immunization programmes continue during this crisis, while adequately protecting health workers and individuals receiving vaccinations. Reaching the most vulnerable children who have missed routine immunizations in the past should be prioritized.” If, during these unprecedented times, local COVID-19 response measures cause temporary interruptions of routine immunization services, countries should plan to resume immunization services as quickly as possible after the situation stabilizes. Countries should be prepared to vaccinate those at higher risk and ensure everyone, including the most marginalized, will have equal access to a COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available. “ We can prevent further impact of COVID-19 on our healthcare systems by assuring that individuals of all ages remain vaccinated according to national schedules. I urge countries to maintain immunization service delivery and drive demand for vaccination, through the life-course even at this difficult time. Prioritizing immunization is one of my four flagship areas and central to WHO’s vision for health in the new European Programme of Work” said Dr Hans Henri P. Kluge, WHO Regional Director for Europe. WHO and UNICEF will continue to support governments’ efforts to strengthen their immunization programmes, including through strategic planning for equitable provision of immunization, strengthening vaccine-preventable disease surveillance and community engagement and education. As we step into a new future, vaccines will continue to serve as a foundation for health and wellbeing for all. It is through solidarity, joint action and tireless commitment to leaving no one behind that we can create a healthier future together.   #Vaccineswork Georgia immunization UNICEF/UN0326765/Georgia
11/04/2021
Ukraine to receive $2.8 million worth of cold chain equipment to support COVID vaccination
https://www.unicef.org/eca/press-releases/ukraine-receive-28-million-worth-cold-chain-equipment-support-covid-vaccination
 - The Ministry of Health of Ukraine in partnership with UNICEF, and with financial support from the US Government through USAID, starts an unprecedented upgrade to the cold chain for vaccines at the national level, in the context of COVID pandemic. To meet immediate needs, a total of $2.8 million provided by USAID will be used by UNICEF to procure WHO-prequalified passive cooling equipment to ensure safe and efficient transport and temporary storage of vaccines for primary health care facilities and mobile teams.  The USAID donation will provide equipment to some 3,100 vaccination sites nationwide, including 1,034 sites based at primary healthcare facilities and nearly 800 mobile teams.  The equipment will include: 5,643 cold boxes,  8,100 vaccine carriers, 197,730 ice-packs, 27,486 temperature monitoring devices  The first batch of equipment arrived on September 30, and includes 2,700 vaccine carriers that can keep COVID-19 vaccines between +2 to +8°C. This equipment can also be used in the future for routine vaccines included in the national immunization  schedule. “Every adult person in Ukraine has a chance to get a vaccination against COVID-19 today.  We have enough vaccines to immunize 70 percent of the population by the end of the year.  The Ministry is expecting to  receive more COVID-19 vaccines  in October-November. We are grateful to  partners helping us ensure safe transport and temporary storage of the larger amount of vaccines we are receiving,”  said Ihor Kuzin,  Deputy Minister of Health, Chief State Sanitary Doctor of Ukraine. “The U.S. Government, as the largest donor to COVAX, is proud to partner with the Ministry of Health, UNICEF, and the international community in this historic effort to rapidly scale up COVID-19 vaccines. This investment in Ukraine's cold chain system will help ensure that vaccination sites across the country can transport and store vaccines at the proper temperature. This will increase Ukrainians' access to safe, high-quality COVID 19 vaccines - and will strengthen the national immunization system,"
09/26/2021
Teachers from the Guria region are getting COVID-19 vaccination as part of a joint campaign by UNICEF and the Government
https://www.unicef.org/eca/press-releases/teachers-guria-region-are-getting-covid-19-vaccination-part-joint-campaign-unicef
 UNICEF continues to engage educators and school administrators in the COVID-19 vaccination programme. More than 200 teachers from Guria region learned about the benefits and the importance of COVID-19 vaccination through information sessions organized by UNICEF in partnership with the Ministry of Education and Science and the National Center for Disease Control and Public Health. The sessions were led by prominent doctors and public health experts and were attended by the educators from Ozurgeti, Lanchkhuti and Chokhatauri municipalities. As frontline workers, it is important that teachers have access to vaccinations for safe school reopening. The sessions were led by a new group of prominent medical experts, including: Maia Gotua Prof. MD. Ph.D. General Director of the Center of Allergy and Immunology, Vice President of Georgian Association of Allergology and Clinical Immunology; Mamuka Bokuchava Prof. MD. Ph.D. Vascular Surgeon, Deputy  Director  Of  Bokhua  Memorial  Cardiovascular  Center; Nino Kiknadze Associate Prof. MD. Ph.D. Director Of Clinical Services at Raymann Clinic; Levan Vashakidze MD. Anesthesiologist, Head of Anesthesia departments of Bokhua Memorial Cardiovascular Center and the New Hospital. UNICEF Deputy Representative Amy Clancy addressed the teachers focusing on the importance of safe reopening of schools. During the sessions the doctors and healthcare professionals covered a variety of topics including: COVID-19 immunization trends in Georgia and current situation regarding the virus; the importance of immunization and COVID-19 complications, including among children; vaccination of people with chronic diseases and allergy conditions. The teachers were invited to get vaccinated on the spot, following the informational sessions. Most teachers participating in the event got their vaccines. Since May 2021, UNICEF has organized 19 similar meetings in different regions of Georgia for local community leaders, including teachers, doctors, religious leaders and tourism sector representatives, to engage them in the national vaccination programme. More than 1000 teachers got vaccinated following the sessions, on the same day. The teachers have since spread information about the benefits of vaccination in their communities, resulting in higher rates of vaccination.  As a result of joint interventions, as of 31 August 2021, the number of teachers fully vaccinated against COVID-19 increased from 9% to 46%. UNICEF, in partnership with the Ministry of Education and Science and with support from NCDC, plans to organize 42 meetings for more than 3000 teachers to be vaccinated by the end of the year. Schools are central to children’s development, safety, and well-being. The risks to children, while they are out of school, are greater than the risks to them while in school, for three key reasons: The impact of school closures on students’ learning, health, and well-being at critical developmental stages have profound repercussions on children, their families, and their economy. Many of these children will never catch up. With risk mitigation measures in place, schools are safe environments for children. The latest evidence shows that schools do not drive the spread of COVID-19 in the community and that COVID-19 does not pose a high risk to children. School closures have the greatest negative impact on the most vulnerable children, those who are far less likely to have access to remote learning and more likely to be exposed to violence, abuse, neglect, child labor, and other risks. Closing schools must be a temporary measure of last resort in pandemic response; and schools must be the first to open and the last to close. Assessing the risk of transmission at the local level should be a key determinant in decisions on school operations. Teacher is getting her COVID-19 vaccination after the session held by UNICEF and the Government. UNICEF/GEO-2021/Kvachadze
08/31/2021
UNICEF procures healthcare supplies worth over KGS 12 million to help the Kyrgyz Republic respond to COVID-19
https://www.unicef.org/eca/press-releases/unicef-procures-healthcare-supplies-worth-over-kgs-12-million-help-kyrgyz-republic
delivered personal protective equipment worth over KGS 12,000,000 to the Ministry of Health and Social Development. UNICEF provided 8,000 medical masks, 12,500 pairs of nitrile gloves for vaccinators, 20,000 pairs of gynaecological gloves, and 11,350 units of antiseptics for healthcare institutions and medical workers. UNICEF procured Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) on behalf of the Ministry through its Supply Division based in Copenhagen, hosting the world's largest humanitarian warehouse. The Ministry of Health and Social Development will use these essential supplies to support its ongoing vaccination efforts to respond to the pandemic and protect frontline healthcare workers. Gynaecological gloves are also being delivered to maternity facilities in Bishkek, Osh and Batken to improve the safety of mothers, newborns and medical staff. In addition, UNICEF procured 890,000 medical masks to ensure safe vaccination against COVID-19. " UNICEF is working around the clock to deliver essential supplies globally to respond to COVID-19. It includes the provision of vaccines, syringes, immunization equipment, medicines and personal protective equipment. In close collaboration with the Government of Kyrgyzstan, we are providing these protective supplies to maternities and hospitals so that everyone can be protected ", said Yulia Oleinik, UNICEF Deputy Representative in Kyrgyzstan. UNICEF will continue to support the Government in the COVID-19 response by delivering COVID-19 vaccines through the COVAX facility, procuring cold chain equipment for vaccine storage, providing essential supplies for frontline workers and supporting the socioeconomic measures to ensure that every child can survive and thrive. The handover of the supplies to the maternity house in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan UNICEF Kyrgyzstan
10/30/2021
UNICEF engages medical students in a country-wide campaign to promote COVID-19 vaccination
https://www.unicef.org/eca/press-releases/unicef-engages-medical-students-country-wide-campaign-promote-covid-19-vaccination
 Students specializing in the field of medicine from three different universities in Georgia will engage in a 6-month campaign, organized by UNICEF and the Association of Immunization and Vaccinology (AIVA) with support from USAID, to share information on and to promote the COVID-19 vaccination programme. Memorandums will be signed with the Tbilisi State University, the Tbilisi State Medical University, the Batumi State University and the International University Batumi to engage students in disseminating information about COVID-19 vaccines. The campaign, with the slogan “ You can end this pandemic!”,  will target young people in selected regions and share evidence-based information on COVID-19, its possible complications and prevention measures, and will focus on why vaccination against COVID-19 is important. With a network of medical students, a medical students league will be established. The league members or “med-iators” will first undergo a full day training to improve their understanding about the existing vaccination process and the available vaccines. Among the trainers are: Maia Gotua, Prof. M.D. Ph.D. General Director of the Center of Allergy and Immunology, Vice President of Georgian Association of Allergology and Clinical Immunology; Archil Marshania M.D. Anesthesiologist and Tamar Ratishvili M.D. member of the vaccine research group at Mayo Clinic. After the initial training, the student league will be regularly updated on the latest information on COVID-19 vaccines and statistics, which the league will use for further communication with the communities. The students will go on field trips to hard-to-reach villages of mountainous Adjara, as well as ethnic minority communities in Samtskhe-Javakheti and Kvemo Kartli regions. During the visits, the students will set up a visually prominent stand in the center of the village, where local population, especially young people, will receive latest and reliable information about COVID-19 vaccination. The students will also assist the local population in registering for vaccination and will distribute additional information, such as brochures and fliers in Armenian and Azerbaijani languages, targeting ethnic minorities. UNICEF has been actively supporting the Government in raising awareness about the importance of COVID-19 vaccination in Georgia. Since May 2021, UNICEF has organized more than 50 informational meetings on COVID-19 vaccination across Georgia with local community leaders, teachers, nurses, doctors, religious leaders and tourism sector representatives to engage them in the national vaccination programme. UNICEF engages medical students in a country-wide campaign to promote COVID-19 vaccination UNICEF/GEO-2021/Valishvili
07/02/2020
‘RM Child-Health’: safeguarding the health of refugee and migrant children in Europe
https://www.unicef.org/eca/rm-child-health-safeguarding-health-refugee-and-migrant-children-europe
More than 1.3 million children have made their way to Europe since 2014, fleeing conflict, persecution and poverty in their own countries. They include at least 225,000 children travelling alone – most of them teenage boys – as well as 500,000 children under the age of five. In 2019 alone, almost 32,000 children (8,000 of them unaccompanied or separated) reached Europe via the Mediterranean after perilous journeys from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and many parts of Africa – journeys that have threatened their lives and their health. Many have come from countries with broken health systems, travelling for months (even years) with no access to health care and facing the constant risks of violence and exploitation along the way. Many girls and boys arriving in Europe have missed out on life-saving immunization and have experienced serious distress or even mental health problems. They may be carrying the physical and emotional scars of violence, including sexual abuse. The health of infants and mothers who are pregnant or breastfeeding has been put at risk by a lack of pre- and post-natal health services and of support for child nutrition. Two girls wash a pot in the common washing area of the Reception and Identification Centre in Moria, on the island of Lesvos, in Greece. Two girls wash a pot in the common washing area of the Reception and Identification Centre in Moria, on the island of Lesvos, in Greece. Child refugees and migrants also face an increased health risk as a result of crowded and unhygienic living conditions during their journeys and at their destinations. Even upon their arrival in Europe, refugee and migrant children and families often face continued barriers to their health care, such as cultural issues, bureaucracy, and a lack of information in their own language. Southern and South East European countries are at the heart of this challenge, struggling to meet the immediate needs of vulnerable refugee and migrant children. And now, an already serious problem is being exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Refugee checks on his son