24 результатов для:
03/30/2020
Заявление Исполнительного директора ЮНИСЕФ Генриетты Фор относительно сбоев в предоставлении услуг по иммунизации и базовых медицинских услуг 
в связи с пандемией COVID-19
https://www.unicef.org/eca/ru/Пресс-релизы/заявление-исполнительного-директора-юнисеф-генриетты-фор-относительно-сбоев-в
НЬЮ-ЙОРК, 26 марта 2020 года., Во всем мире в результате пандемии COVID-19 службы здравоохранения перегружены, поскольку деятельность медицинских работников переключается на оказание содействия в принятии мер реагирования. Необходимость соблюдения физического дистанцирования вынуждает родителей принимать трудное решение о переносе сроков плановой иммунизации. Отмечается…, ###, Примечания для редактора, Загрузить мультимедийный контент о вспышке COVID-19, мытье рук и вакцинах можно здесь: https://uni.cf/2WydpEk . Nurse Milka Babic performs immunization UNICEF/UNI218376/Pancic
04/06/2021
What you need to know about COVID-19 vaccines
https://www.unicef.org/eca/stories/what-you-need-know-about-covid-19-vaccines
Vaccines save millions of lives each year. The development of safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines is a huge step forward in our global effort to end the pandemic and to get back to doing more of the things we enjoy with the people we love. We’ve gathered the latest expert information to answer some of the most common questions about COVID-19…, How do COVID-19 vaccines work?, Vaccines work by mimicking an infectious agent – viruses, bacteria or other microorganisms that can cause a disease. This ‘teaches’ our immune system to rapidly and effectively respond against it.  Traditionally, vaccines have done this by introducing a weakened form of an infectious agent that allows our immune…, Are COVID-19 vaccines safe?, Yes, even though COVID-19 vaccines are being developed as rapidly as possible, they must go through rigorous testing in clinical trials to prove that they meet internationally agreed benchmarks for safety and effectiveness. Only if they meet these standards can a vaccine receive validation from WHO and national regulatory agencies. UNICEF will…, How were COVID-19 vaccines developed so quickly?, Thanks to the unprecedented investment in research and development and global cooperation, scientists were able to develop safe and effective vaccines against COVID-19 in record time. All the standard safety procedures and rigorous regulatory standards were maintained. In addition to the COVID-19 vaccines currently in use in many countries around…, Which COVID-19 vaccine is best for me?, All WHO-approved vaccines have been shown to be highly effective at protecting you against severe illness from COVID-19. The best vaccine to get is the one most readily available to you!  , Will the COVID-19 vaccines work against the new variants?, WHO says that the vaccines approved to date are expected to provide at least some protection against new variants. Experts around the world are continuously studying how the new variants affect the behaviour of the virus, including any potential impact on the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines. Should any of the vaccines be shown to be less…, Who should be vaccinated first?, As there is not enough manufacturing capacity in 2021 to meet all global needs, not everyone will be able to get the vaccine at the same time. Countries must identify priority populations, which WHO recommends are frontline health workers (to protect health systems) and those at highest risk of death due to COVID-19, such as older adults and…, When shouldn’t you get a COVID-19 vaccine?, If you have any questions about whether you should receive a COVID-19 vaccine, speak to your doctor. At present, people with the following health conditions should not receive a COVID-19 vaccine to avoid any possible adverse effects: If you have a history of severe allergic reactions to any ingredients of a COVID-19 vaccine. If you are currently…, Should I get a vaccine if I’ve already had COVID-19?, Yes, you should get vaccinated even if you’ve previously had COVID-19. While people who recover from COVID-19 may develop some natural immunity to the virus, we do not yet know how long it lasts or how well you are protected. Vaccines offer more reliable protection.  , Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine if I’m breastfeeding?, Researchers are currently studying COVID-19 vaccination in breastfeeding women, but there is still limited information at this time. WHO advises that vaccinations are offered if a lactating woman is part of a priority group for vaccinations, for example if you are a health worker. Breastfeeding can continue after vaccination and remains one of the…, Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine if I’m pregnant?, Although the overall risk of severe illness from COVID-19 remains low, pregnancy puts you at higher risk of severe illness compared to people who are not pregnant. Research is still ongoing to understand the safety and effects of COVID-19 vaccination in pregnant women, but there is no known reason that would outweigh the benefits of vaccination…, Can COVID-19 vaccines affect fertility?, No, you may have seen false claims on social media, but there is no evidence that any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines, can affect fertility in women or men. If you are currently trying to become pregnant, you do not need to avoid pregnancy after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine.  , Should my child get a COVID-19 vaccine?, Children’s immune systems are different from those of adults and can vary significantly depending on their age. At present, WHO-approved COVID-19 vaccines are not recommended for anyone under the age of 16-18 years (depending on the individual vaccine), even if they belong to a high-risk group. Children were not included in the…, When will a COVID-19 vaccine be available in my country?, The distribution of vaccines is underway globally and the vaccine availability varies by country. We recommend checking with your health ministry to get the latest information for your country. On behalf of the COVAX Facility, UNICEF is procuring COVID-19 vaccines and delivering them around the world to make sure no country is left behind. Our…, What is COVAX?, COVAX is part of a global effort aimed at accelerating the development and manufacture of COVID-19 vaccines, and to guarantee fair and equitable access around the world. No country will be safe from COVID-19 until all countries are protected. There are 190 countries and territories engaged in the COVAX Facility, which account for over 90 per cent…, I’ve seen inaccurate information online about COVID-19 vaccines. What should I do?, Sadly, there is a lot of inaccurate information online about the COVID-19 virus and vaccines. Misinformation in a health crisis can spread paranoia, fear and stigmatization. It can also result in people being left unprotected or more vulnerable to the virus. Get verified facts and advice from trusted sources like your local health authority, the …, Can COVID-19 vaccines affect your DNA?, No, none of the COVID-19 vaccines affect or interact with your DNA in any way. Messenger RNA, or mRNA, vaccines teach the cells how to make a protein that triggers an immune response inside the body. This response produces antibodies which keep you protected against the virus. mRNA is different from DNA and only stays inside the cell for about 72…, Do the COVID-19 vaccines contain any animal products in them?, No, none of the WHO-approved COVID-19 vaccines contain animal products.  , How can I protect my family until we all receive a COVID-19 vaccine?, Safe and effective vaccines are a gamechanger, but it is still not clear the degree to which they can protect us against infection and transmission. For the time being, even once vaccinated we need to continue taking precautions to protect ourselves and others. This includes wearing masks, physical distancing and regular handwashing. This article…
09/30/2021
A child’s guide to COVID-19
https://www.unicef.org/eca/stories/childs-guide-covid-19
As the COVID-19 virus continues to spread around the world, many children like you are keen to get answers to their burning questions about the disease and what they can do to help protect themselves from it. We hope you find this helpful.  , 1.What is COVID-19?, COVID-19 is a disease caused by a virus that can spread through the air and land on surfaces. The virus gets its name through the combination of its syllables: ‘CO’ from ‘corona’ – the latin word for ‘crown’, because the outer ring of the virus looks crown-shaped under a microscope, ‘VI’ for virus and ‘D’ for disease. The number ‘19’ refers to the…, 2. How can I get COVID-19?, You can get the virus by being in close contact with infected people who discharge small droplets when they sneeze, cough, laugh, sing, speak or even breathe. You can also be infected by touching surfaces that have been contaminated by the virus and then touching your eyes, nose or mouth without cleaning your hands., 3. How do you know if you have COVID-19?, People with COVID-19 can have a number of symptoms (a change in the body that shows something is wrong), or they may have no symptoms at all! These symptoms often include a fever, cough, headache and/or tiredness.  Sometimes people also report losing their sense of taste and smell, having problems breathing or a sore throat. Whether they have…, 4. Can children and young people catch COVID-19?, Yes, anyone can catch the COVID-19 virus and spread it to others.  Children don’t usually become seriously ill from the disease unless they have other health problems that put them at more risk, but even so we all need to be careful. , 5. What should I do to protect myself and others from the virus?, You can help protect yourself and your friends and family  in simple ways such as: by keeping a safe distance between yourself and other people – at least 1 metre or about twice the length of your outstretched arms.  by avoiding crowded or closed spaces where there isn’t much air flow. It’s also a good idea to keep windows and doors open and to…, 6. How can I keep safe when going to and at school?, Remember that there are many things you can do to help protect yourself on your way to school, when you’re in the classroom and when you’re returning home. Avoid crowded public transport if you can. Discuss with your parents if there is an alternative, such as walking or cycling. If you need to get a bus or train, try to keep your distance from…, 7. Do I need to wear a mask?, Every country has its own recommendation on the use of masks. Make sure you know what the recommendation in your country, city or school is. You may ask your parents or teachers about it.  If you need to wear a mask, wear it like a superhero:  When putting it on, make sure you adjust it to cover your mouth, nose and chin.  While wearing it, do not…, 8. Many talk about the COVID-19 variants: what are they?, Viruses commonly mutate (in other words they change in form over time). Each change is very small, but after many such changes the virus’ form and characteristics become different enough to be called a ‘variant’ of the original virus. Some variants of COVID-19 are more transmissible (able to spread easier) and can also cause more serious illness.…, 9. Do children need to have a COVID-19 vaccine?, COVID-19 vaccines are not yet available for children below 12 years old. As most children don’t get seriously ill from COVID-19, at this stage vaccination is not recommended for children. However, children and adolescents older than 12 with health problems, such as diabetes, lung or heart disease or other chronical diseases that might put them at…, 10. Are COVID-19 vaccines safe?, Yes. COVID-19 vaccines have been thoroughly tested and are found to be safe. They have also proven to be very good at reducing the chances of people getting seriously ill or dying from COVID-19. Thanks to the joint work of scientists and research organizations across the world, safe COVID-19 vaccines were developed in record time., 11. How do vaccines work?, When our body is attacked by a virus or bacteria that causes a disease, our immune system (the body’s natural defense) produces an army of soldiers, called ‘antibodies’. These antibodies fight off infection from the invading disease. When the body is attacked for the first time by this particular invader, the immune…, 12. What should I do if I think I have COVID-19?, If you have a cough, fever, headache, sore throat or have trouble breathing, inform your parents or your teacher immediately. It may or may not be COVID-19 but it is good to be tested straight away just in case. If the test shows that you have the virus, don’t be scared. Follow your parents' and doctor's advice so you can recover quickly. Do not…, 13. What else can I do to help fight against COVID-19?, Learn more about COVID-19 and tell your family and friends how they can protect themselves from it by sharing some of the tips in this guide.
05/13/2021
Empowering refugee and migrant children to claim their right to health: Improving health literacy
https://www.unicef.org/eca/stories/empowering-refugee-and-migrant-children-claim-their-right-health-improving-health-literacy
“I have always had to behave ‘like a girl’ and I am not used to being asked for my opinion, but you ask me to say what I think during these workshops.”   A 13-year-old girl from Syria describes the impact of empowerment workshops in Serbia  Boy is drawing a picture. UNICEF-supported activities for children on the island of Lesvos, Greece The ‘RM…, In Bosnia and Herzegovina, , information workshops have been tailored to the needs of different groups of children, including those who are unaccompanied and separated. Topics over the past year have included personal and oral hygiene, drug and alcohol use and its impact on health, the importance of immunization, early childhood development, medical…, In Bulgaria, , the initiative has supported group sessions that have exceeded their targets, with 99 sessions held for refugee children and mothers – more than three times the 28 sessions envisaged. There were more than twice as many information sessions on gender-based violence as originally planned: 107 rather than 48. In all, 600 refugee and migrant…, In Greece, , support from the initiative has enabled UNICEF and its partners to equip refugee and migrant children with information on health risks, entitlements and services through its non-formal education programme in urban areas and on the islands. In the first full year of the initiative, 1,796 children and 464 parents have received crucial information…, In Italy, , there has been an emphasis on peer-to-peer health literacy over the past year. Young refugees and migrants have shared critical health messages through, for example, the U-Report on the Move platform – a user-friendly, cost-effective and anonymous digital platform with more than 6,000 subscribers, where they speak out on the issues that matter…, Serbia, have also been exceeded, with 1,094 refugee and migrant children and parents receiving information on mental health (original target: 500) and 722 receiving information on GBV (original target: 600). Looking beyond the sheer numbers of beneficiaries, those taking part in health literacy workshops, in particular, have voiced their appreciation. One…