The first 160 judges were trained on the protection of minors against detention for migration reasons.

21 May 2024
Children
UNICEF/UN0831592/Tuna/ASAM

Warsaw, 14th of May 2024 - Through the joint efforts of the UNICEF Refugee Response Office in Poland, the Ministry of Justice, and the National School of Judiciary and Prosecution, the first 160 judges have been trained in prevention of detention of minors due to migration reasons. 

Since March 2023, the National School of Judiciary and Prosecution, with the support of UNICEF, has been implementing the project "Implementation of the idea of juvenile-friendly justice and strengthening the rights of victims," focused on refugee children.  As part of this project, training is conducted on children's participation in migration procedures as well as proceedings related to sexual offenses and domestic violence. Trainings on detention due to migration reasons and alternative measures to placing foreign minors in guarded facilities took place in October 2023 and February 2024. Their aim was particularly to present and promote the latest document of the UN group on children deprived of liberty - UN Advocacy Brief - which aims to eliminate the detention of children for migration reasons. Furthermore, the joint recommendations of UNHCR, IOM, and UNICEF, on the use of alternatives to detention and appropriate care solutions for refugee and migrant children in Europe were presented.

In total, 3863 people have participated in training organized by the National School of Judiciary and Prosecution (KSSIP) as part of the project implemented with the support of UNICEF: judges, prosecutors, legal advisors, and court guardians.

"This is an important step towards ensuring justice and protection for children with migration experience, who are among the most vulnerable groups of children" says Milena Harizanova from the UNICEF Refugee Response Office in Poland. "The joint initiative of UNICEF, the Ministry of Justice, and the National School of Judiciary and Prosecution aimed at training legal practitioners is part of our commitment to creating a supportive environment for the most vulnerable children in Poland. This project not only educates, but also builds a solid foundation for a more empathetic and understandable justice system for all children in Poland, regardless of where they come from. 

Providing this specialized support to the Polish justice system to better respond to the needs of refugee and migrant children is possible thanks to private and public donors from around the world, including the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration of the U.S. Department of State.

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On the cooperation between the UNICEF Refugee Response Office in Poland and the Ministry of Justice:

UNICEF collaborates with the Ministry of Justice to ensure that refugee and migrant children in Poland, as well as other most vulnerable groups, have access to a justice system that is friendly to the youngest. The joint work plan of UNICEF and the Ministry of Justice, along with the National School of Judiciary and Prosecution (KSSiP), includes activities aimed at raising awareness about violence against children, building the capacity of justice system personnel (prosecutors, judges, and lawyers), and increasing access to legal assistance for refugee and migrant children. 

Media contacts

Monika Kacprzak
Communication Specialist
UNICEF Refugee Response Office in Poland
Tel: (+48) 604 226 866

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