25 May 2023

Three-month-old Sulaiman beats pneumonia

Three-month-old Sulaiman was born at home in Shyampur, a slum in Dhaka, with a neighbour – a former nurse – assisting his mother to bring him into the world. He and his parents share an apartment with two other families, each with one private room but sharing the bathroom and the kitchen.  Shyampur is a fusion of big factory buildings, apartment…, Fighting pneumonia, Sulaiman had been fighting pneumonia for several days. His breathing was fast, and he made harsh sounds as he struggled to get air into his lungs. He cried and coughed through the night, unable to sleep. His parents brought him to a UNICEF-supported Aalo clinic near their home where he received medical care. Baby Sulaiman cried and coughed through…, Baby Sulaiman cried and coughed through the night, unable to sleep., UNICEF/UN0825812/Mawa With the Aalo clinic offering free services less than a kilometer from their home, it’s easy for Sulaiman's parents bring him in for treatment. UN0825814.jpg, With the Aalo clinic offering free services less than a kilometer from their home, it’s easy for Sulaiman's parents bring him in for treatment., UNICEF/UN0825814/Mawa Baby Sulaiman cried and coughed through the night, unable to sleep. With the Aalo clinic offering free services less than a kilometer from their home, it’s easy for Sulaiman's parents bring him in for treatment. Dr Moumita Sarker and another general physician run the morning shift at the Shyampur Aalo clinic along with a team…, Sulaiman’s breathing improves as he gets his daily dose of treatment., UNICEF/UN0846162/Mawa Sulaiman’s breathing improves as he gets his daily dose of treatment. UN0825811.jpg, Sulaiman’s breathing improves as he gets his daily dose of treatment., UNICEF/UN0825811/Mawa Sulaiman’s breathing improves as he gets his daily dose of treatment. Sulaiman’s breathing improves as he gets his daily dose of treatment., A struggling health care system, In the urban slums of Bangladesh, around 40 per cent of the children are stunted, meaning they are too short for their age due to malnutrition. This is much higher than the national stunting prevalence of 28 per cent which is already unacceptably high. In addition, only 56 per cent of deliveries in slums are supported by skilled birth attendants,…, Simple diagnostic tests and medicines are out of reach for many in Bangladesh's urban slums., UNICEF/UN0825809/Mawa Simple diagnostic tests and medicines are out of reach for many in Bangladesh's urban slums. UN0825813.jpg, Simple diagnostic tests and medicines are out of reach for many in Bangladesh's urban slums., UNICEF/UN0825813/Mawa Simple diagnostic tests and medicines are out of reach for many in Bangladesh's urban slums. UN0846151.jpg, Simple diagnostic tests and medicines are out of reach for many in Bangladesh's urban slums., UNICEF/UN0846151/Mawa Simple diagnostic tests and medicines are out of reach for many in Bangladesh's urban slums. Simple diagnostic tests and medicines are out of reach for many in Bangladesh's urban slums. Simple diagnostic tests and medicines are out of reach for many in Bangladesh's urban slums., Solutions towards affordable primary health care, The Shyampur Aalo Clinic is one of six urban clinics opened in Bangladesh as a model for primary health care provision in urban areas. Through this model, UNICEF, supported by Government of Sweden and in partnership with the Government of Bangladesh, is delivering an essential package of common health services such as maternal and newborn care,…, Three-month-old Sulaiman beat pneumonia, thanks to the staff at a UNICEF-supported clinic., UNICEF/UN0825819/Mawa Three-month-old Sulaiman beat pneumonia, thanks to the staff at a UNICEF-supported clinic. UN0825816.jpg, Three-month-old Sulaiman beat pneumonia, thanks to the staff at a UNICEF-supported clinic., UNICEF/UN0825819/Mawa Caring, attentive professionals are the face of Aalo clinics. UN0825817.jpg, Caring, attentive professionals are the face of Aalo clinics., UNICEF/UN0825817/Mawa Three-month-old Sulaiman beat pneumonia, thanks to the staff at a UNICEF-supported clinic. Three-month-old Sulaiman beat pneumonia, thanks to the staff at a UNICEF-supported clinic. Caring, attentive professionals are the face of Aalo clinics. The Aalo clinics are helping children like Sulaiman beat common childhood illnesses…, Medical staff at an Aalo clinic inside Korail, one of the largest slums in Bangladesh., UNICEF/UN0825822/Mawa Reaching under - served children and families in slums. UN0825821.JPG, Reaching under - served children and families in slums., UNICEF/UN0825821/Mawa Medical staff at an Aalo clinic inside Korail, one of the largest slums in Bangladesh. Reaching under - served children and families in slums.
02 May 2023

Your baby’s first foods: Mini Parenting Master Class

What are the best first foods for babies? What should I do if my baby refuses to eat? We speak to nutrition expert Dr. Purnima Menon to find out what parents need to know about introducing first foods to their children. , Transcript of “Mini Parenting Master Class on your baby’s first foods” video, Feeding babies isn’t just about putting food in their mouths. It’s also about them learning to eat. It’s about them learning to enjoy their food. It’s about a positive interaction between parents and babies and about food being part of that positive relationship.   My name is Dr. Purnima Menon and this is my Mini Parenting Master Class on your…, When is my baby ready to try her first foods?, Six months is just about the right time to start introducing babies to first foods. It’s the time when breast milk stops being enough in terms of fulfilling nutritional needs. It’s also a time when children a developmentally ready and are, themselves, interested in trying new foods. So six months is just about right., What are the best first foods for babies?, It’s quite important that these first foods be as packed with nutrients as we can possibly make happen. So pureed coloured vegetables, like carrots, pumpkins and sweet potatoes. Pureed fruits are nice. You can feed them pureed meats, if your family eats those. Eggs are a great first foods for babies. You can actually modify almost anything you’re…, How should I prepare first foods for my baby?, If you’re starting first foods when babies are six months old, you absolutely need to puree them. First foods need to be soft. The babies need to be able to swallow them easily. Now you can adapt this over time so when you first introduce foods, you need to puree them but you can adapt the texture a little bit as the babies grow a little bit older., How can I make the introduction of first foods a fun and positive experience for me and my baby?, First foods are about so much more than just about the food. It’s about culture. It’s about love. It’s about children learning to become part of our families. And if parents keep that whole picture in mind, it just takes the stress off a little bit from just getting food into your baby’s mouth. And I think the best thing we can do is remind…, What should I do if my baby refuses to eat first foods?, Oh, babies refuse foods all the time and again, we have to remember it’s them learning. You’re tasting something new. It’s very natural for babies sometimes to refuse that taste and sometimes, the science tells us in fact that babies need to taste some things several times before they can be comfortable with it. So it’s quite important that…, Should I spoon-feed my baby or let him reach for the food himself?, You can feed babies with either a spoon or with very clean hands. It’s really quite important to wash hands and make sure that everything you’re feeding the baby with is as clean as it can be. Again, the one thing we have to remember is that babies are learning and they’re very interested in their food, so the feeding of babies really needs to be…, How often should I feed my baby solid foods?, When you start first foods, you want to start offering them about three or more times a day. And then as the babies grow older, so as soon as maybe they’re 9 or 12 months of age, you need to increase this to about four times a day. And you need to increase the quantities as well, so it isn’t enough to feed the same quantities at 12 months that you…, After introducing solid foods, should I continue breastfeeding?, You should absolutely continue to breastfeed. It’s currently recommended that breastfeeding is continued for at least two years and perhaps, even beyond. In a sense, breast milk and the nutrients that breast milk provides is the basis of good nutrition for babies. And the first foods are adding in other critical missing nutrients that babies need…