We’re building a new UNICEF.org.
As we swap out old for new, pages will be in transition. Thanks for your patience – please keep coming back to see the improvements.

Map of South Sudan
UNICEF photo: A boy smiles for the camera, a school chalkboard in the background © UNICEF South Sudan/2018/Sebastian Rich A 13-year-old student at Rock City Primary School in Juba, South Sudan, who knows education is good for her future. The school opened in 2018 in response to the influx of internally displaced persons.

South Sudan

In 2019, UNICEF and partners plan for:
220,700

children aged 6 to 59 months admitted for SAM treatment

475,000

children aged 6 months to 15 years vaccinated against measles

800,000

people accessing the agreed quantity of water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene

2019 Requirements: US$179,230,500

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

Snapshot

Total people in need: 7.1 million16
Total children (<18) in need: 4.4 million17

Total people to be reached: 1.8 million18
Total children to be reached: 800,00019

While the signing of a peace agreement in September 2018 formally put an end to the conflict in South Sudan, the humanitarian situation remains dire.1 The multidimensional crisis is characterized by continued violence, severe food and nutrition insecurity, economic upheaval and disease outbreaks. Over 4.5 million people have been uprooted, including 2 million people who are internally displaced and 2.5 million people who have taken refuge in neighbouring countries.2 An estimated 1.5 million people are located in areas with extremely limited humanitarian access3 due to insecurity and operational interference. By early 2019, an estimated 5.2 million people will be experiencing crisis levels (or worse) of acute food insecurity,4 and more than 220,700 children under 5 years will suffer from severe acute malnutrition (SAM).5 Malaria remains the main cause of morbidity and mortality among children.6 Since 2014, the United Nations has verified 2,700 incidents7 of grave violations affecting over 81,000 children. Gender-based violence is occurring at an alarming rate, with some 2,300 incidents reported to service providers during the first half of 2018, mostly affecting women and girls.8 Over 2.2 million children across South Sudan are now out of school9 and 6 million people require water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services.10

Humanitarian strategy

2019 programme targets

Nutrition

  • 220,700 children aged 6 to 59 months admitted for SAM treatment20
  • 984,700 caregivers of children aged 0 to 23 months reached with infant and young child feeding counselling

Health

  • 475,000 children aged 6 months to 15 years vaccinated against measles21
  • 200,000 children and pregnant women provided with insecticide-treated nets in malaria-endemic areas22

WASH

  • 800,000 people accessing the agreed quantity of water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene
  • 300,000 people accessing appropriate sanitation facilities

Child protection

  • 275,000 children reached with psychosocial support services
  • 168,000 girls, boys, women and men reached with gender-based violence prevention and response services

Education

  • 729,000 children accessing quality formal or non-formal early learning, pre-primary, primary or secondary education
  • 5,500 teachers trained on education-in-emergencies basic pedagogy and learner-centred methodologies23

In 2019, UNICEF will provide life-saving humanitarian assistance in South Sudan through a timely and effective integrated package of nutrition, health, WASH, child protection and education services delivered through interconnected, complementary responses. To ensure that support has a wide reach, services will be delivered through static operations, direct outreach and rapid response modalities. UNICEF’s operations will be led by its 13 field offices11 to enable wide coverage and quality programming across the country. UNICEF’s leadership of the nutrition and WASH clusters and child protection area of responsibility and its co-leadership of the education cluster will enable strategic planning, coordinated response, capacity building of partners and advocacy both at the national and state levels. Emergency cash programming will be implemented through UNICEF’s strong existing collaborations and inter-agency mechanisms such as the Cash Working Group. The response will expand in 2019 to include recovery and resilience programming in selected field locations, including basic social service delivery, community-based system strengthening and accountability to affected populations. UNICEF will invest in increasing the localization of aid in South Sudan through capacity building and targeted resource allocation. Following the peace deal, UNICEF will also further invest in building the capacities of central and sub-national state authorities.

Results from 2018

As of 31 October 2018, UNICEF had US$141.5 million available against the US$183.3 million appeal (77 per cent funded).12 These funds allowed UNICEF to deliver assistance to 2.4 million people,13 including 1.8 million children.14 In 2018, UNICEF reached 82 per cent of targeted children with SAM treatment, including in highly inaccessible locations. In malaria prevention, the distribution of bed nets exceeded the target by 45 per cent due to expanded programme coverage. Eighty-two per cent of targeted children were immunized against measles.15 While 62 per cent of the target population gained access to safe water, only 51 per cent are accessing appropriate sanitation facilities due to cultural barriers and under-funding. Psychosocial support provided by UNICEF and partners reached 89 per cent of targeted children. Gains were made in girls’ access to education, with girls making up 44 per cent of the 559,000 children reached with education-in-emergencies services. The education target was exceeded by 12 per cent thanks to the sustained availability of funding. Forty-five Integrated Rapid Response Mechanism missions were deployed to hard-to-reach locations, reaching over 533,000 people, including 109,000 children under 5 years. The year’s results were achieved with partners, including state authorities, through static, outreach and mobile interventions.

 

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

Funding requirements

UNICEF requires US$179.2 million to meet the humanitarian needs of women and children in South Sudan in 2019. These funds will allow UNICEF to provide life-saving aid to those suffering from extreme food insecurity, especially children with SAM who are living in hard-to-reach areas. Adequate funding will allow UNICEF to scale up crucial programmes and prepare for and respond to outbreaks of epidemic-prone diseases, such as cholera. Without this funding, UNICEF will be unable to provide critical WASH services or address rampant gender-based violence through prevention and response interventions. Country-wide insecurity underpins the high operating costs in South Sudan.

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

__________________
1 The Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in South Sudan has been signed, formally putting an end to the conflict in South Sudan. However, the humanitarian situation remains dire and violence continues in some parts of the country due to inter-communal conflict and hostilities initiated by opposition groups not party to the agreement.
2 Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, ‘South Sudan: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft), OCHA, 2018, p. 3. The Humanitarian Needs Overview document was not finalized/published at the time of writing this appeal. The appeal will be updated to be aligned with the published Humanitarian Needs Overview, once finalized.
3 Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, ‘South Sudan: Humanitarian Access Severity Overview’, OCHA, September 2018.
4 Integrated Food Security Phase Classification, Republic of South Sudan, September 2018–March 2019.
5 Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, ‘South Sudan: 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan’ (draft), OCHA, 2018, p. 33. The Humanitarian Response Plan document was not finalized/published at the time of writing this appeal. The appeal will be updated to be aligned with the published Humanitarian Response Plan, once finalized.
6 South Sudan Ministry of Health and World Health Organization, ‘Weekly Epidemiological Bulletin W44’, 6 November 2018.
7 The Country Task Force on Monitoring and Reporting did a comprehensive cleaning of the data of verified incidents in 2018, which resulted in the number of incidents and affected children declining.
8 ‘South Sudan: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft), p. 18.
9 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, ‘Global Initiative on Out-of-School Children: South Sudan country study’, UNESCO, May 2018.
10 ‘South Sudan: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft), p. 28.
11 As of 2019, the field offices will include the Abyei area based on the approved country programme management plan.
12 Available funds include US$76.6 million received against the current appeal and US$64.8 million carried forward from the previous year.
13 This figure is based on the number of curative consultations provided to women and children (2.3 million). An additional 100,000 men were reached through the WASH programme (estimated at 25 per cent of the total WASH population reached). UNICEF opted not to use the communication for development figure, which has wider coverage and reach but is not fully verified.
14 A total of 1 million children under 5 years were reached through curative consultations; an additional 700,000 children older than 5 years were reached through measles vaccination; and an additional 100,000 children aged 16 to 17 were reached through education.
15 As per the Humanitarian Response Plan, 791,183 children aged 6 months to 15 years have been vaccinated, which is 82 per cent of the Humanitarian Response Plan target, extrapolated at 964,682 children aged 6 months to 15 years.
16 ‘South Sudan: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft), p. 3.
17 Children are 61 per cent of the total number of people in need, according to ‘South Sudan: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft), p. 27.
18 Total people to be reached includes 984,700 caregivers to be reached with infant and young child feeding counselling and 800,000 children to be admitted for treatment of SAM or reached with formal or non-formal early learning, pre-primary, primary or secondary education.
19 Total children to be reached is 800,000 children to be admitted for treatment of SAM or reached with formal or non-formal early learning, pre-primary, primary or secondary education.
20 UNICEF targets 85 per cent of the nutrition cluster target for children aged 6 to 59 months with SAM admitted for treatment (262,000). ‘South Sudan: 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan’ (draft), p 33.
21 The target includes children reached during reactive immunization campaigns (measles outbreak) and emergency outreach interventions only and not the general country-wide campaigns.
22 Humanitarian Action for Children targets indicated here represent long-lasting insecticide-treated nets distributed to families with pregnant women and children under 5 years during emergency interventions only.
23 Gender-based-violence-specific programming where prevention and response are combined.
24 The request for funds has decreased by US$15.5 million (58 per cent) compared with 2018. This is due to a reduction in the target for emergency interventions as part of a move towards development programming. The Humanitarian Action for Children requirement is lower than that of the Humanitarian Response Plan due to additional supply procurement needs included in the Humanitarian Response Plan.
25 The UNICEF requirement is higher than that in the Humanitarian Response Plan as UNICEF child protection work incorporates mine risk education and gender-based violence programming.