We’re building a new UNICEF.org.
As we swap out old for new, pages will be in transition. Thanks for your patience – please keep coming back to see the improvements.

Map of Somalia
UNICEF photo: two school girls © UNICEF Somalia/2018/HornConnect Happy students at the UNICEF-supported Beritir centre in Dolow, Gedo region. The school, which is attended by 120 students aged 5 to 10 years, has two classrooms, a playground and WASH facilities.

Somalia

In 2019, UNICEF and partners plan for:
950,000

people accessing temporary safe water services for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene

10,000

survivors of gender-based violence receiving clinical care, case management, psychosocial support, legal assistance and safe house support

165,000

children and youth accessing formal or non-formal primary education (boys/girls)

2019 requirements: US$145,325,618

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

Snapshot

Total people in need: 4.2 million9
Total children (<18) in need: 2.5 million10

Total people to be reached: 1.5 million11
Total children to be reached: 885,00012

Despite improvements in the food security situation in Somalia, humanitarian needs remain acute due to the continued conflict and repeated climatic shocks. An estimated 4.2 million people, including 2.6 million internally displaced persons and 2.5 million children, require humanitarian assistance.1 The nutrition situation remains serious, with 1.5 million people projected to require emergency nutrition support in 2019.2 Of these, 954,000 children under 5 years will suffer from malnutrition, including 173,000 children at risk of severe acute malnutrition (SAM).3 Across the country, 3 million people require access to emergency health services and 2.9 million people require water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) support.4 Recurrent disease outbreaks—including of acute watery diarrhoea/cholera and measles—represent a major threat to children.5 Of the 4.9 million school-aged children in Somalia, an estimated 3 million, or more than 60 per cent, are out of school.6 The majority of these children are located in Somalia’s southern and central regions. Grave violations against children are on the rise, with 3,566 children, including 569 girls, reported to be victims of violence committed by parties to conflict—primarily abduction and recruitment/use by armed forces and groups— between January and September 2018. This represents a 44 per cent increase in violations over 2017 levels.7

Humanitarian strategy

2019 programme targets

Nutrition

  • 164,676 children with acute malnutrition treated13
  •  513,000 pregnant and lactating women receiving infant and young child feeding counselling

Health

  • 974,400 people provided with emergency life-saving health services
  • 48,720 emergency-affected pregnant women received delivery services by skilled birth attendants

WASH

  • 950,000 people accessing temporary safe water services for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene14
  • 420,000 people accessing appropriate sanitation facilities15

Child protection

  • 10,000 registered unaccompanied and separated children supported with reunification services, family-based care or an appropriate alternative (boys/girls)
  • 10,000 survivors of gender-based violence receiving clinical care, case management, psychosocial support, legal assistance and safe house support
  • 120,000 children participating in structured community-based psychosocial support activities, including child-friendly spaces

Education

  • 165,000 children and youth accessing formal or non-formal primary education (boys/girls)
  • 300 teachers supported with emergency incentives

Cash-based transfers

  • 30,062 households with children under 5 years diagnosed with SAM and admitted for treatment receiving monthly cash transfers to support access to basic services

In line with the 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan, UNICEF will provide an integrated response to climatic shocks, displacement and conflict in Somalia, including life-saving support to address malnutrition and excess mortality, and a central focus on child protection in all programme activities. UNICEF will sustain critical services in crisis-affected areas and target internally displaced persons in priority locations, while continuing to expand services in hard-to-access areas. The response will prioritize integrated programming that includes nutrition, WASH and health services complemented by child protection and education interventions. UNICEF will maintain its cluster leadership roles, and continue to work closely with line ministries to coordinate activities and support capacity building. Where possible, UNICEF will respond jointly with the World Food Programme (WFP) to address critical malnutrition rates. In line with the Grand Bargain commitments, cash-based assistance will be prioritized, with a gradual transition from humanitarian cash transfers to safety net approaches. UNICEF will also work to strengthen linkages with the Joint Resilience Action, in coordination with WFP and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), to contribute to longer-term, shared outcomes and build resilience, in line with the United Nations New Way of Working principles.

Results from 2018

As of 31 October 2018, UNICEF had US$96.4 million available against the US$154.9 million appeal (62 per cent funded).8 This funding allowed UNICEF to maintain extensive operational reach and deliver significant results for children. UNICEF’s approximately 100 partnership agreements covering 95 per cent of affected areas were also instrumental to achieving the year’s results. UNICEF effectively pre-positioned supplies and worked closely with partners, including WFP, to meet critical needs and targets, such as for SAM treatment (target reached) and the provision of cash transfers benefiting more than 100,000 people. More than 1.1 million people gained temporary access to safe water and over 740,000 women and children gained access to life-saving emergency health services. In addition, over 4.4 million children were vaccinated against measles. More than 78,000 children and adolescents (42 per cent girls) accessed education with the support of UNICEF and the Ministry of Education, and some 29,500 children received psychosocial support. Some 4,700 unaccompanied and separated children were identified and registered, and 9,100 survivors of gender-based violence received appropriate care and support.


x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

Funding requirements

UNICEF is requesting US$145.3 million to meet the needs of crisis-affected people and children in Somalia in 2019. This funding will allow UNICEF and partners to sustain the provision of life-saving services, including essential nutrition, health and WASH interventions, as well as critical child protection and education-in-emergencies activities. These efforts will focus on sustaining service delivery in settlements of internally displaced persons given the current scale of displacement. UNICEF is sincerely grateful to all public and private donors for the contributions received to date. Continued and timely donor support will be critical to scaling up the response and averting famine.

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

_______________
1 Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, ‘Somalia: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft), OCHA, 2018. The Humanitarian Needs Overview document was not finalized/published at the time of writing this appeal. The appeal will be updated to be aligned with the published Humanitarian Needs Overview, once finalized.
2 Famine Early Warning Systems Network, ‘Somalia: 1.5 million people in Somalia still facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse outcomes’, FEWS NET, August 2018, http://fews.net/eastafrica/somalia/food-security-outlook-update/august-2018, accessed 13 December 2018.
3 According to the nutrition cluster, in 2019, 1.5 million people will require emergency nutrition support, including treatment of acute malnutrition and preventive and therapeutic nutrition services. The nutrition situation is at sustained serious levels despite improved food security, reduced disease outbreaks and sustained humanitarian interventions. As a result, some 954,000 children are expected to be acutely malnourished in 2019.
4 ‘Somalia: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft).
5 Disease outbreaks such as outbreaks of acute watery diarrhoea/cholera and measles continue to represent a major threat to children. In 2018, there were 8,002 suspected measles cases (73 percent among children under 5 years) and 6,206 suspected cases of acute watery diarrhoea/cholera, with 42 deaths. United Nations Children’s Fund, ‘Somalia Humanitarian Situation Report No. 10’, UNICEF, 31 October 2018, https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/UNICEF%20Somalia%20Humanitarian%20Situation%20Report%20No.%2010%20-%20October%202018.pdf, accessed 6 December 2018.
6 Somalia Education Cluster, ‘Annual Report 2016’, January 2017, https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/somalia_education_cluster_annual_report_2016.pdf, accessed 6 December 2018.
7 Country Task Force on Monitoring and Reporting, January through September 2018.
8 Available funds include US$76.1 million received against the 2018 appeal and US$20.3 million carried forward from the previous year.
9 ‘Somalia: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft).
10 Fifty-nine per cent of people in need are children, according to ‘Somalia: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft).
11 The 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan for Somalia will target 3.2 million people. Of these, UNICEF will plan to reach 1.5 million people, including 885,000 children. The 2019 UNICEF target of 1.5 million people to be reached was determined based on the greatest number of people to be reached with WASH support in settlements and communities practicing handwashing with soap at critical moments.
12 The UNICEF target for children was calculated based on 59 per cent of people to be reached as per ‘Somalia: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft).
13 This includes the treatment of 130,196 children under 5 years with SAM and 34,480 children under 5 years with moderate acute malnutrition.
14 The adequate quantity of water is the Sphere standard of 15 litres per person per day as adapted/agreed at the country level.
15 Access to appropriate sanitation facilities in settlements and communities means access to a gender-separated sanitation facility located less than 50 metres from the home and equipped with a lockable door.
16 The funding request focuses on reaching 30,062 households with children under 5 years diagnosed with SAM and admitted for treatment with monthly cash transfers to support access to basic services.