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Map of NIgeria
UNICEF photo: an adolescent girl carries a water jug on her head © UNICEF Nigeria/2018/Naftali

Nigeria

In 2019, UNICEF and partners plan for:
158,488

children aged 6 to 59 months with SAM admitted for treatment

149,800

people have sustained access to the agreed quantity of water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene through the construction/rehabilitation of new boreholes

1.05 million

out-of-school boys and girls aged 3 to 17 years affected by crisis accessing formal or non-formal basic education

2019 Requirements: US$120,100,000

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Snapshot

Total people in need: 7.1 million10
Total children (<18) in need: 4.2 million11

Total people to be reached: 2.67 million12
Total children to be reached: 1.77 million13

Protracted violence and conflict-related displacement have had a devastating impact on northeast Nigeria, particularly Adamawa, Borno and Yobe states. Displacement increased in 2018, with 1.8 million people now displaced due to conflict.1 Between January and November 2018, an average of 4,000 individuals— mainly women and children—were displaced every single week, up from an average of 1,400 in 2017.2 The cumulative impact of violence and stress has weakened the coping capacities of communities, and left more than 2 million girls, boys and caregivers in need of psychosocial support.3 Access to adequate water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) remains a challenge. In 2018, cholera outbreaks affected more than 12,000 people and claimed nearly 200 lives in all three states.4 An estimated 368,000 children will be at risk of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in 2019, and an additional 727,000 children will be at risk of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM).5 Across the northeast, particularly in Borno State, at least 867 primary, junior and senior secondary schools remain closed.6 Maintaining humanitarian support will be critical to ensuring that affected people do not slip further into crisis and building resilience against future shocks, particularly as the conflict and related population movements continue.

Humanitarian strategy

2019 programme targets

Nutrition

  • 158,488 children aged 6 to 59 months with SAM admitted for treatment
  • 305,474 primary caregivers of children aged 0 to 23 months received infant and young child feeding counselling at the community and health facility levels
  • 282,034 children aged 6 to 59 months received micronutrient powders

Health

  • 1.14 million outpatient consultations in health facilities supported by health partners
  • 720,230 children under 2 years vaccinated against measles

WASH

  • 149,800 people have sustained access to the agreed quantity of water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene through the construction/rehabilitation of new boreholes
  • 500,000 people having sustained access to agreed safe quality and quantity (at least 15 liters per capita per day) of water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene
  • 500,000 people have access to gender- and disability-sensitive sanitation facilities
  • 1.55 million people reached with handwashing behaviour-change programmes to prevent hygiene-related illness in children, especially diarrhoea

Child protection

  • 287,500 children, adolescents and caregivers reached with psychosocial support, including access to child-friendly spaces, life-skills education and livelihoods services
  • 13,700 children facing protection risks received protective and specialized services
  • 7,000 children and adolescents released from armed forces or groups benefited from community reintegration support

Education

  • 1.05 million out-of-school boys and girls aged 3 to 17 years affected by crisis accessing formal or non-formal basic education
  • 1.05 million boys and girls aged 3 to 17 years accessing inclusive, quality learning with age-appropriate learning materials
  • 4,000 teachers trained in psychosocial support skills and positive discipline14

In close collaboration with the Government, UNICEF co-leads the nutrition, WASH and education sectors and the child protection sub-sector. In line with the country level multiyear inter-agency Humanitarian Response Plan (2019-2021), UNICEF will continue to deliver an integrated package of interventions to affected populations in northeast Nigeria, in coordination with the Government, United Nations agencies, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Partnerships will be strengthened to improve service delivery, building off of the new partnerships established in 2018 with 22 international NGOs and 17 national NGOs. The quality of programming will continue to be improved, and the linkages between humanitarian action and development programming will be strengthened. UNICEF will tailor its assistance to specific needs and contexts through the development of distinct multi-sector response packages for three different types of situations: emergency/ rapid response, protracted crisis and early recovery. UNICEF will employ tailored modalities of engagement for each framework, adapting its own approach based on a clear mapping of the capacities of other humanitarian and development partners, and drawing on UNICEF’s added value. Across all programmatic sectors, UNICEF will strengthen gender-based violence risk mitigation.

Results from 2018

As of 31 October 2018, UNICEF had US$95.1 million available against the US$142.5 million appeal (67 per cent funded).7 With nutrition activities fully funded, UNICEF was able to treat more than 212,700 children with SAM, achieving 99 per cent of the target. More than 1.1 million people gained access to safe water with UNICEF support over the course of the year—more than twice the achievement for 2017.8 However, due to significant funding gaps in the WASH sector, UNICEF only achieved 37 per cent of the planned target for access to sanitation facilities. In the health sector, funding gaps prevented UNICEF from rehabilitating damaged health infrastructure and purchasing equipment to improve the quality of care. With available funds, UNICEF prioritized ensuring the continuity basic primary health care, through adequate staffing and supplies in conflict-affected areas, which allowed UNICEF to reach nearly 2.9 million people with outpatient consultations (exceeding the target). UNICEF’s child protection response reached more than 294,000 children and caregivers with psychosocial support services, and over 193,000 children and caregivers with mine risk education. Nearly 203,000 boys and girls received learning materials, though funding gaps prevented UNICEF from reaching a higher number of children as originally planned.9

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Funding requirements

In line with the country level multi-year inter-agency Humanitarian Response Plan (2019-2021), UNICEF is requesting US$120.1 million to meet the humanitarian needs of children in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe states in northeast Nigeria. Without adequate and timely funding, UNICEF will be unable to treat acutely malnourished children, continue critical WASH services for internally displaced persons vulnerable to cholera outbreaks, or provide basic health services such as malaria prevention. A lack of funding would also undermine the provision of critical child protection services and basic supplies for primary education, which are urgently needed to protect children’s right to education.

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1 International Organization for Migration, ‘Nigeria Displacement Tracking Matrix Round 25’, IOM, October 2018.
2 IOM Displacement Tracking Matrix Emergency Tracking Tools, 2017-2018.
3 Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, ‘Nigeria: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft), OCHA, 2018. The Humanitarian Needs Overview document was not finalized/published at the time of writing this appeal. The appeal will be updated to be aligned with the published Humanitarian Needs Overview, once finalized.
4 Based on Borno, Yobe and Adamawa cholera situation reports and information from the state ministries of health/health sectors, August-November 2018.
5 ‘Nigeria: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft).
6 Ibid.
7 Available funds include US$51.2 million received against the current appeal and US$43.9 million carried forward from the previous year.
8 This achievement included rolled over works for which funds were transferred to implementing partners in the last quarter of 2017, but the works were completed and reported in 2018.
9 United Nations Children’s Fund, ‘Nigeria Humanitarian Situation Report’, UNICEF, 1-31 October 2018.
10 ‘Nigeria: 2019 Humanitarian Needs Overview’ (draft).
11 Ibid.
12 Figure calculated based on 1.05 million children aged 3 to 17 years to be reached with education + 720,230 children under 2 years to be vaccinated against measles. This number has been combined with the proportion of WASH beneficiaries over the age of 18 (59 per cent or 916,901 individuals).
13 Ibid.
14 Male and female teachers.