We’re building a new UNICEF.org.
As we swap out old for new, pages will be in transition. Thanks for your patience – please keep coming back to see the improvements.

Map of Kenya
UNICEF photo: a child sucks on a package of PlumpyNut while her mother looks on © UNICEF Kenya/2017/Oloo

Kenya

In 2017, UNICEF and partners plan for:
78,925

children under 5 with SAM admitted into the integrated management of acute malnutrition (IMAM) programme

780,000

children under 5 accessing an integrated package of health interventions, including for the management of diarrhoeal diseases

650,000

people gain permanent access to 7.5-15 litres per person per day of safe water

2017 Requirements: US$42,435,000

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

Snapshot

Total people in need: 3,400,0001
Total children (<18) in need: 1,720,000

Total people to be reached in 2017: 1,326,0002
Total children to be reached in 2017: 1,188,0003

The food security and nutrition situation in Kenya has deteriorated significantly since March 2017, due to the escalating severe drought affecting 23 Arid and semi-Arid land (ASAL) counties and other areas of the country. An estimated 3.4 million people are food insecure,4 a 32 per cent increase from 2.6 million in February 2017. The severe acute malnutrition (SAM) caseload remains high, with 104,614 children under-five in need of treatment this year.5 Nine counties are reporting GAM over 15 per cent6 compared to five counties in February. Acute water shortages and consequent resource-based conflicts among pastoralist communities remain, and only 10-20 per cent of open water sources have recharged due to poor rains.7 The ongoing cholera outbreak is spreading with 2,210 cases and 32 deaths (Case Fatality Rate 1.4 per cent) reported across 16 out of the 47 counties since January. A total of 414 Kala-Azar cases have been reported with seven deaths and 1,537 cases of Dengue Fever cases with one death.8 The number of separated and exploited children due to the drought continues to increase, with 13,862 identified by July. Resource-based conflict, political violence related to 2017 elections and drought-related refugee influxes into Kakuma and Dadaab camps9 could further worsen the humanitarian situation in the country.

Humanitarian strategy

2017 revised programme targets [10]

Nutrition

  • 78,925 children under 5 with SAM admitted into the integrated management of acute malnutrition (IMAM) programme
  • 194,656 children under 5 with MAM admitted into the IMAM programme

Health

  • 780,000 children under 5 accessing an integrated package of health interventions, including for the management of diarrhoeal diseases
  • 185,000 children under five vaccinated against measles

WASH

  • 650,000 people gain permanent access to 7.5-15 litres per person per day of safe water
  • 600,000 people reached with critical WASH-related information to prevent child illness, especially diarrhoea
  • 110,000 children access safe water, sanitation and hygiene facilities in their learning environment

Child protection

  • 30,000 most vulnerable children are provided with access to protection services

Education

  • 288,000 children aged 3 to 18 years affected by crises accessing formal and non-formal education opportunities

HIV and AIDS

  • 90,000 Adolescents have access to HIV, sexual and reproductive health and life-skills education and access to services that include testing and treatment

Social protection

  • 70,000 vulnerable households in six ASAL counties receive top-up cash transfers to help meet basic needs

UNICEF has revised its humanitarian strategy for 2017, to focus primarily on scaling up interventions in existing response locations and expanding to new areas affected by the severe drought. UNICEF’s response continues to focus on strengthening sector coordination, advocacy, and delivery of life-saving supplies and services in support of government-led efforts through different partnerships with both government and NGO counterparts. UNICEF has developed an integrated, multi-sectoral Drought Response Plan to respond to the life-saving and protection needs of more than 780,000 children through mass screening and treatment for malnutrition; the provision of safe water through repairing strategic water points; strengthening disease prevention and response, including cholera; supporting children to enrol and remain in school; and providing child protection and humanitarian cash transfer assistance services to improve food security for vulnerable households. UNICEF’s nutrition response continues to integrate humanitarian and development interventions through multi-sector convergence and programming for resilience. UNICEF is investing significantly in preparedness including with support to ongoing national and county-level contingency planning processes and prepositioning of supply in potential displacements areas. Response to refugee influxes from South Sudan and Somalia in Kakuma, Kalobeyei and Dadaab camps continues, including through the provision of nutrition, child protection, WASH, health, HIV and education services.

UNICEF results to date

As of end August, UNICEF has US$27.3 million funds available against its US$41 million original appeal (61 per cent funded).11 With the available funding, 47,986 SAM and 91,319 MAM children under 5 years of age received treatment between January and July 2017, accounting for 57 per cent and 53 per cent respectively of the sector targets. A total of 61,707 cartons of Ready to Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF) have been dispatched, supporting the treatment of 61,707 children with SAM. Over 220,000 children under five have been reached this year through health outreach services in drought-affected areas through the provision of essential health supplies, technical support and C4D interventions for treatment of common childhood illness and disease outbreaks. 143,331 people including 23,651 school children in drought-affected Counties have permanent access to safe water from 62 rehabilitated water points. Another 176,316 people have temporary access to safe water through household water treatment, and 390,794 people have received critical WASH related information for disease prevention including cholera. Cumulatively, 14,880 drought-affected children have been identified with protection concerns and rescued from neglect, separation and exploitation, and reached with case management support including family tracing, reunification, psychosocial support and referral for medical care.

 

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

Funding requirements

UNICEF has revised its Humanitarian Action for Children (HAC) requirements for Kenya from US$41 million to US$42.4 million to meet the increased humanitarian needs of children in the country due to the rapidly deteriorating drought, to cover refugee response needs as well as the significant investments made in preparedness. Funding requirements include US$24.7 million for drought response targeting 23 drought-affected counties;12 US$7.3 million for the refugee response and US$10.4 million for preparedness which takes into consideration the needs for potential pre/post-election violence and subsequent displacement as well as resource based conflict, disease outbreaks, and flash floods. Without additional funding, UNICEF will be unable to support the national response to the drought emergency, and mitigate the risk of a worsening situation for children. With increasing vulnerability due to deterioration of the nutrition status and limited access to water, the number of children and women requiring nutrition, health, WASH and a social protection response will increase. Emergency education supplies are also needed to uphold children’s rights to education and protection, with schools serving as critical entry points for life-saving interventions.

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

_________________________
1 Kenya Long Rains Assessment, July 2017
2 The total number of people to be reached by UNICEF in 2017, includes 780,000 children under five befitting from integrated health package and 546,000 adults and children (6-18 years) benefiting from WASH services.
3 The total number of children to be reached by UNICEF in 2017, includes 780,000 children under five befitting from integrated health package (which are the same children befitting from UNICEF’s other interventions (Early childhood education, nutrition, WASH and child protection services), plus the 6-18 years cohort benefitting from Education, Child Protection, school WASH and HIV/AIDS.
4 2017 Long Rains Assessment, July 2017
5 Nutrition SMART Surveys, July 2017, total caseload
6 Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) for Acute Malnutrition conducted in July 2017
7 WESCOORD sector lead by the Ministry of Water and Irrigation estimates that 2.6 million are in need of water across 23 ASAL counties of Kenya.
8 Ministry of Health Disease Outbreak Sitrep, 15th August, 2017
9 A total of 1,189 individuals who have arrived in the Dadaab Refugee camps due to the ongoing drought in Somalia. UNHCR is involved, with RAS (the Refugee Affairs Secretariat), in profiling of new arrivals on a weekly basis. In total the refugee and asylum seeker population in Kenya, increased from 486,011 in June to 488,045 people as at 31 July 2017. (UNHCR data). The 2017 Dadaab Drought Contingency Plan (UNHCR and Partners) estimates an influx of 75,000 refugees from Somalia due to the drought.
10 UNICEF HAC targets currently do not include other risks such as pre/post-election violence and subsequent displacement and resource based conflict, disease outbreaks, and flashfloods. The number of people potentially affected will be determined by assessments conducted at a later date, at which point another HAC revision may be required. The same populations affected by the ongoing severe drought will most likely be affected by the other risks mentioned above.
11 Available funds include funding received against the existing appeal of US$41 million and approximately US$7.2 million carried forward from the previous year, of which US$2.8 million is for the refugee response.
12 The revised Inter-Agency Flash Appeal 2017 only targets 11 counties, while UNICEF interventions are targeting 23 drought-affected counties. UNICEF funding requirements to respond to the drought are therefore higher in the HAC as the support goes beyond the scope of the Flash Appeal.
13 The nutrition and WASH requirements are increased while the education requirement decreased as per the revised flash appeal and the results of the Long Rains Assessment which show that more people are in need of water, and more children are in need of nutrition interventions. For education, school drop outs and irregular attendance are directly linked to lack of water and food in school due to the drought. The school WASH needs are covered by WASH, while the school food needs are covered under the school feeding programme under WFP (Food Security Sector), thus the decrease in the overall Education response needs.
14 Child protection is overfunded due to carry-forward funding from multi-year refugee response grants (2016-2018). However, for the drought response, child protection is only 21 per cent funded.