We’re building a new UNICEF.org.
As we swap out old for new, pages will be in transition. Thanks for your patience – please keep coming back to see the improvements.

Map of Kenya
UNICEF photo © UNICEF Kenya/2019/Oloo

Kenya

In 2019, UNICEF and partners plan for:
579,200

children affected by acute watery diarrhoea, malaria or measles accessing life-saving preventative and curative interventions

250,000

people accessing the agreed quantity of water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene

96,028

children aged 6 to 59 months with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) admitted for treatment

2019 requirements: US$28,299,494

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

Snapshot

Total people in need: 4,473,97110
Total children (<18) in need: 2,147,50611

Total people to be reached: 881,69212
Total children to be reached: 749,19213

Following poor October to December 2018 rains, there are now 1.1 million food-insecure people1 in Kenya, up from 700,000 people in August 2018.2 This figure is expected to reach 2.5 million people by July 2019 due to the failed March to May 2019 rains.3 The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) outlook indicates significant declines in food security between June and September 2019.4 The total global acute malnutrition caseload for children under 5 years has gone up from 511,000 to 582,934 by February 2019, of which 125,688 children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition.5 In the arid and semi-arid (ASAL) counties, most open water sources are reported to have dried up and strategic boreholes have broken down due to over-use, increasing average distances to water points to above the five-year average.6 According to the Ministry of Health , drought conditions have exacerbated ongoing disease outbreaks, with 2,466 cholera cases with 6 deaths and 477 measles cases with 3 deaths reported in 2019.7 Kenya hosts nearly 474,000 refugees (56 per cent children) by 30 April 2019, up from 468,000 in October 2018 due to increased influx to Kakuma Refugee Camps.8

Humanitarian strategy

2019 programme targets

Nutrition

  • 96,028 children aged 6 to 59 months with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) admitted for treatment14

Health

  • 579,200 children affected by acute watery diarrhoea, malaria or measles accessing life-saving preventative and curative interventions15

WASH

  • 250,000 people accessing the agreed quantity of water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene16

Child protection

  • 13,575 children (52 per cent girls) provided with psychosocial support, including access to child-friendly spaces with inter-sectoral programming interventions17

Education

  • 169,000 school-aged children, including adolescents (50 per cent girls), accessing formal or non-formal early learning, pre-primary, primary or secondary education18

Social protection

  • 30,000 vulnerable households reached with cash transfer top up19

In 2019, UNICEF Kenya has revised its humanitarian strategy to scale up the drought response. Through its sector lead role for Nutrition, WASH, Child Protection and Education, UNICEF is monitoring the evolving drought situation and taking a lead in multi-sector preparedness and response through the inter-agency and Government-led coordination mechanisms at national and county levels. UNICEF’s key humanitarian interventions include enhancing health and nutrition outreach services in hard-to-reach areas, supporting vaccination campaigns, providing sustainable safe water interventions, behaviour change communication for disease outbreak response and maintaining essential nutrition services. UNICEF is implementing the integrated, multi-sector drought response plan focusing on mass screening and treatment for malnutrition; increasing access to safe water through repair of strategic water points; strengthening disease prevention and response, supporting children to enroll and remain in school; providing child protection services and humanitarian cash transfer assistance to improve food security for vulnerable households. Response to the basic needs of refugees and host communities including new arrivals in Kakuma, children affected by the voluntary repatriation of refugees to Somalia in Dadaab refugee camps and cross-border displacements continues including support to basic services delivery and longer-term humanitarian interventions.

Results from 2019

By March 2019, UNICEF had US$2.9 million available million available against the US$28.3 million appeal (10 per cent funded).9 Over 13,400 severely malnourished children and nearly 16,500 moderately malnourished children in the arid and semi-arid lands and urban informal settlements have received treatment with UNICEF support. Nearly 142,700 children were reached with life-saving preventative and curative health interventions, including treatment for malaria and acute watery diarrhoea. Over 60,400 people were reached with cholera awareness messaging while 748 were treated at Cholera Treatment Centers and isolation units with UNICEF-supported health supplies. A total of 31,000 people in cholera- affected areas in Narok and Kajiado counties and 19,000 people in drought-affected counties (Tana River, Mandera and Isiolo) accessed safe water through household water treatment and storage. Over 50,000 women, girls, boys and men received critical WASH related information for prevention of illnesses. UNICEF facilitated assessment and provision of care and support to 791 (301 girls) unaccompanied and separated children in Kakuma. Nearly 11,000 children (2,256 girls) and 269 teachers (85 women) benefitted from emergency education supplies and permanent classrooms, of which 4,728 children (2,117 girls) are refugees.

 

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

Funding requirements

UNICEF is requesting US$28.2 million to meet the humanitarian needs of children affected by drought and disease outbreaks, and to provide basic services to refugees and host communities. Of the total funding requirements, UNICEF requires US$22.4 million for critical nutrition, education, WASH, child protection and social protection needs to complement government interventions in response to the drought situation in Kenya. Without adequate funding, UNICEF will be unable to support the survival and protection needs of vulnerable children.

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

_________________________
1 Government of Kenya, Kenya Food Security Steering Group, ‘The 2018 Short Rains Season Assessment Report’ (SRA), 8 March 2019
2 Government of Kenya, Kenya Food Security Steering Group, ‘The 2018 Short Rains Season Assessment Report’ (SRA), February 2019
3 National Drought Management Authority (NDMA) Drought Updates, Government of Kenya, May 2019
4 FEWSNET, 'Most likely scenario' February to September 2019
5 Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) of 2018 Short Rains Assessment (SRA 2018), 8 March 2019
6 National Drought Management Authority (NDMA) Drought Updates, Government of Kenya, May 2019
7 Ministry of Health Disease Outbreaks Sitrep, Government of Kenya, 6 May 2019.
8 UNHCR Kenya Operation Statistics, April 2019
9 Available funds include US$1,250,000 million raised against the current appeal and US$1,709,809 million carried forward from the previous year.
10 This figure was calculated based on an estimated 2.5 million people to be affected by drought (National Drought Management Authority); 473,971 refugees who will require assistance (UNHCR); and an estimated 1.5 million people to be affected by health and epidemic-related emergencies (Government of Kenya Ministry of Health).
11 This figure was calculated based on children accounting for 48 per cent of the total affected population (Kenyan census). Kenya National Bureau of Statistics, ‘Population and Housing Census August 2009’, 2010
12 UNICEF's population coverage includes the highest programme targets for children under-5 under the health response (579,200), the adult population receiving WASH services (53 per cent of target – 132,500), adolescents receiving child protection services (13,575), children & adolescents (6 to 18 yrs – 156,417) receiving education services (80 per cent of total education target).
13 For the total children to be reached, the number is calculated based on the health, education and child protection targets. Other sectors are not included in the calculations to avoid double counting.
14 Based on the 2018 SRA, according to which the SAM caseload for refugee population is 10,572; 68,805 is the new ASAL SAM caseload and 16,651 is the new urban informal settlements caseload.
15 The health indicators have deteriorated due to the drought emergency (in April/May 2019) due to increased disease outbreaks and morbidity. The target is based on disease attack rates.
16 The rationale for maintaining the same target is that the original HAC target was based on a floods scenario, but it is now substituted with a drought scenario – 220,000 being affected by drought and 30,000 by minimal flash floods during the short rains. As the initial target focused on the flood risk, which is now largely diminished, this target focuses largely on the ASAL counties affected by drought.
17 The target has increased to reflect increased child vulnerabilities due to the drought – disruption of family protective structures due to population movement in search of food, water and pasture, exposing children to the risk of exploitation and abuse – 8,000 most vulnerable drought-affected children are targeted, and the 5,575 refugee target is maintained.
18 The change is target reflects the likely disruption of the education of school aged children and adolescents, including refugees, as a result of the drought. The target also takes into account he continued inter-ethnic conflicts/cattle rustling over pasture and water, and impact on access to education services.
19 The most vulnerable households will be given support based on assessments for food needs and re-establishment of livelihoods.
20 Funding requirements have increased for all sectors in light of the scale of humanitarian needs in ASAL counties and urban informal settlements.
21 This includes cash transfers to vulnerable households and capacity building of national systems to strengthen shock-responsiveness.
22 UNICEF has enhanced sectoral and multi-sectoral coordination as a key strategy for the drought response. Through its sector lead role for nutrition, WASH, child protection and education, UNICEF will continue to monitor the evolving drought situation in Kenya and take a lead in multi-sectoral preparedness and response. Additional support to the NDMA in enhancing coordination, information management and providing real-time information on ongoing government response is urgently needed as these areas have remained a challenge in the ongoing response.